Oracle Fusion Middleware Patterns

By Harish Gaur , Markus Zirn , Srikant Subramaniam and 21 more
  • Instant online access to over 7,500+ books and videos
  • Constantly updated with 100+ new titles each month
  • Breadth and depth in over 1,000+ technologies
  1. Building Agile Applications using Fusion Development and Oracle Enterprise Architecture Principles

About this book

In today's business environment, the needs of Enterprises are rapidly changing and these changes demand an unprecedented level of adaptation and innovation. There is a clear need for flexible solutions that support continuous adaptation to an ever-evolving, ever-expanding marketplace. This book catalogs a series of 10 case studies that reflect the experience of Enterprises who have met today's challenges by adopting a new style of development: the use of integrated tools in the Oracle Fusion Middleware Suite.

Every enterprise has specific business requirements that may require unique solutions. This book will give you the insights required to recognize the needs of your enterprise and implement Fusion solutions. These solutions are quick to build, implement, and productive when compared to traditional agile solutions.

This book introduces you to innovative custom-built solutions that enterprises can implement to overcome the challenges they face. Significant benefits are achievable through powerful insights and improved decision making; by combining "What" and "How" analyses – you will see how to go about this. You may already be using solutions for Identity Management, User Interaction, Content Management, Development Tools, SOA and BPM, Enterprise Performance Management, Business Intelligence, and Application Grid; this book will show you how to integrate them to provide innovative, effective solutions.

Publication date:
September 2010
Publisher
Packt
Pages
224
ISBN
9781847198327

 

Chapter 1. Building Agile Applications using Fusion Development and Oracle Enterprise Architecture Principles

by Mike Blackmore, Hamza Jahangir, Harish Gaur, and Basheer Khan

According to Gartner Research, medium- to large-scale IT organizations spend, on an average, not more than 20 percent of their budget on new projects. That seems like a very low number given the speed at which business is changing. From new social media-based marketing techniques to open Web 2.0-style collaboration for customer service, to modern predictive analytics, business seems to be on a march towards fundamental transformation, while the underlying IT always seems to be catching up. So, why do we spend such a small proportion of the IT budget on innovating and modernizing to meet the demands of the business?

The problem is that keeping the lights on in our IT organizations is becoming an increasing cost to the business and gobbling up a larger chunk of the IT budget every year. If IT is to keep pace with the level of demand for information from the business, the costs will likely grow at the same pace or faster, unless the enterprise implements a fundamentally new approach to managing IT applications and systems.

In this chapter we introduce two approaches—Fusion Development (an application development process) and Oracle Enterprise Architecture (an architecture development framework and process) for governing the way IT organizations manage changes to business demands and requirements without ripping and replacing the existing architecture and technology foundation. This chapter discusses Fusion Development and Oracle Enterprise Architecture application at two companies—British Telecom (BT) and Pardee Homes.

Enterprise application development challenges

Over the past decade, most enterprises have responded to information demands by procuring or developing new applications without much consideration of the underlying technology foundation. This is understandable behavior given that the immediate priority was to deliver discrete functions, such as billing and human resources, delivered by packaged or home-grown applications. Today, as those types of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems are becoming commoditized, businesses are starting to harness value by cross-referencing and correlating data from multiple systems to gain new insight about the business. In Web 2.0 parlance this is referred to as a mash-up, in which data from many sources is combined to deliver a rich, composite view to the business user. Increasingly, this is moving from a nice-to-have feature in our enterprise applications to one that is absolutely required to remain competitive in almost all areas of the business. However, the transition to that form of composite enterprise application architecture is challenging, mainly for the following reasons:

  • Existing applications were not meant to interact technologically or semantically (that is, no canonical or semantic data model for business data)

  • No centralized integration process or platform for applications to exchange and share the necessary data

  • Hard to manage security and privacy of sensitive business data

Another unique aspect of these kinds of composite applications is that they go through much faster lifecycles; the speed of requirement change is getting faster as the overall speed of change increases around business strategies and processes. This necessitates more frequent additions and changes to the application, which traditional software development processes are not able to handle very well. The modern enterprise application development needs to be much more responsive and iterative in nature if it is to deliver features on time to the business. As a result, with the new application architecture, driven by fusing information from disparate data sources, IT must also take a fundamentally new approach to its application development capabilities. It must be able to deliver modern enterprise applications faster and more cost-effectively and prevent a cost explosion as your need for information continues to grow. This new approach must be comprehensive and span all the way from architecture development to implementation to change management.

 

Enterprise application development challenges


Over the past decade, most enterprises have responded to information demands by procuring or developing new applications without much consideration of the underlying technology foundation. This is understandable behavior given that the immediate priority was to deliver discrete functions, such as billing and human resources, delivered by packaged or home-grown applications. Today, as those types of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems are becoming commoditized, businesses are starting to harness value by cross-referencing and correlating data from multiple systems to gain new insight about the business. In Web 2.0 parlance this is referred to as a mash-up, in which data from many sources is combined to deliver a rich, composite view to the business user. Increasingly, this is moving from a nice-to-have feature in our enterprise applications to one that is absolutely required to remain competitive in almost all areas of the business. However, the transition to that form of composite enterprise application architecture is challenging, mainly for the following reasons:

  • Existing applications were not meant to interact technologically or semantically (that is, no canonical or semantic data model for business data)

  • No centralized integration process or platform for applications to exchange and share the necessary data

  • Hard to manage security and privacy of sensitive business data

Another unique aspect of these kinds of composite applications is that they go through much faster lifecycles; the speed of requirement change is getting faster as the overall speed of change increases around business strategies and processes. This necessitates more frequent additions and changes to the application, which traditional software development processes are not able to handle very well. The modern enterprise application development needs to be much more responsive and iterative in nature if it is to deliver features on time to the business. As a result, with the new application architecture, driven by fusing information from disparate data sources, IT must also take a fundamentally new approach to its application development capabilities. It must be able to deliver modern enterprise applications faster and more cost-effectively and prevent a cost explosion as your need for information continues to grow. This new approach must be comprehensive and span all the way from architecture development to implementation to change management.

 

Fusion development


Before we get into Fusion development and the Oracle Enterprise Architecture Framework (OEAF), let's consider a modern apartment complex in terms of how it is designed. Units have a different number of bedrooms, different interior designs to fit the owners' needs, and yet follow a common architecture for common services like water, electricity, and gas. The modern IT organization is similar in the sense that while individual lines of business and departments might be asking for different types of applications, systems, and data, there needs to exist a common architecture that provides a framework upon which new applications can be built easily and quickly. This framework should reuse a lot of common patterns and infrastructure services, such as information storage, security, monitoring, and so on. If we are able to reuse these basic services repeatedly, the focus for application development can transition from coding applications to composing applications from existing services.

This is the fundamental approach of Fusion development—solutions are assembled, not written. Solutions are built by assembling services together, and in the process, they transcend disparate technology boundaries. Oracle is pioneering this new style of development. Oracle Fusion Middleware is making this happen here at Oracle. Oracle Fusion Middleware is the convergence layer for existing and future Fusion applications and services. Fusion applications and services are built on Fusion Middleware infrastructure and utilize diverse technologies, including Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA), Business Intelligence (BI), Identity Management, Enterprise Content Management, Coherence, Business Process Management (BPM), Complex Event Processing (CEP), and Application Servers.

In principle, Fusion Development is very similar to Extreme Programming and iterative development, and is heavily influenced by SOA. The focus is on applications that can be quickly built and easily managed. The following figure illustrates the key steps to building such an application using the Fusion Development approach:

Starting at the top:

  • Model and Analyze: Having a common understanding of how the business functions, which applications and people are involved, and the key business drivers is an essential element of Fusion development. This requires bringing key business stakeholders together with their IT counterparts to collaborate and iron out any differences in understanding. This results in well-defined process models, schemas, and Key Performance Indicators (KPI) that eliminate any concerns that the business requires, but IT can't deliver (Refer to Chapter 2,

  • Create Service Layer: Services play a very important role in the concept of assembling applications. In this step, we build a portfolio of reusable data, business, and application services. These become the building blocks for composing new applications with the utmost speed and flexibility (Refer to Chapter 3, Code-free Application Extensions and Integrations and Chapter 4,

  • Enable Visibility: Business decisions are driven by insight. These insights are delivered to the business user, in this step, using BI, Event-driven Architecture, Essbase, and BAM. Using real-time and historical intelligence, business users can monitor the health of a business and take corrective actions (Refer to Chapter 6, Achieving Business Insight by Integrating Relational and Multi-dimensional Data and Chapter 7,

  • Build Rich UI: In this step, users get a personalized view of their dashboard in a rich, Web 2.0 environment. It brings together content, workflow, and dashboards and offers a seamless UI experience (Refer to Chapter 5, Integrated Real-time Intelligence Using Oracle WebCenter, Oracle Coherence, and Oracle Business Activity Monitoring and Chapter 8,

 

Oracle Enterprise Architecture


Since Fusion Development enables rapid application development through composition instead of coding, the barriers for an enterprise to make changes are lowered. But this isn't necessarily always a good thing for IT organizations. Rapid application development and changes can unfortunately foster rapid decision-making without a full understanding or assessment of the true impact of those decisions. Just because we can quickly change doesn't necessarily mean we can always recover from big mistakes. In fact, rapid and extreme programming techniques can sometimes expedite the process of failure if not properly governed by a common vision and a well thought-out decision-making framework.

The Oracle Enterprise Architecture Framework (OEAF) and Oracle Architecture Development Process (OADP) provide a decision-making framework that can be used with Fusion development to provide IT organizations with a mechanism to make fast decisions that align with a central vision and direction. The point of using OEAF and OADP is not to get in the way of agile development, but steer it in a way that maximizes the value of IT to the business.

The OEAF is an EA framework (similar to TOGAF and Zachman), but specialized to realize three key principles:

  • Simple and practical: In other words, this is not an architecture modeling exercise but a practice to get to tangible business value

  • Start with the business: The OEAF is an architectural framework that always starts the conversation from the point of view of the business and what it is trying to achieve

  • Leverage existing assets: The OEAF comes with a library of the latest reference models, best practices, and reference architectures from Oracle and the industry to expedite the process of deciding on the best approaches for your enterprise

The OEAF is organized into the architectural views illustrated in the following figure:

The OADP is a companion to the OEAF, providing it with some prescriptive guidance on the sequence of decisions that should be made before we start developing applications and other IT capabilities. The process can be leveraged by senior IT management to lay a foundation for all day-to-day operational decisions. In a very simplistic view, OADP provides a process for defining the vision for the future-state of IT and a systematic way to arrive at that future state through appropriate architecture and IT governance methods. At a high level, the OADP process is broken into phases, as illustrated in the following figure:

OADP is a highly collaborative and iterative process where assumptions are constantly refined and tested to ensure that the IT organization is operating as effectively as possible to deliver requirements defined by the business. Also, OADP advocates a mindset based on principles and performance metrics to manage IT projects. If those principles and performance metrics are clearly articulated and understood by the organization, there is no need to micromanage projects. This concept is exemplified in the British Telecom use case described in the next section, in which the Chief Architect managed the entire British Telecom IT organization using 12 simple rules.

 

IT rationalization at British Telecom Property Group


British Telecom is a global corporation that is more than 100 years old, operating in over 170 countries worldwide, with more than 100,000 employees. British Telecom's Group arm handles the procurement of all BT goods and services, managing over 10,000 properties and running 50,000 vehicles. Over 150,000 people require daily access to 10,000+ buildings in which to work and meet.

The BT Property system's estate had grown organically through first and second generation web applications and stood at 46 systems. These systems utilized a wide variety of application and database technologies, including ColdFusion, ASP, .NET, J2EE, Oracle 8i, Oracle 9i, SQL Server, and MS Access.

Because of this organic system growth, business processes sat in fragments of code in web pages, as stored procedures in databases, as cells in spreadsheets, and all too often just in peoples' heads. For customers, these issues manifested a very poor user experience, plagued by low systems reliability, low availability, and thus reduced utilization of the BT Property estate. The effect on the actual property estate was tangible, as building maintenance problems went unreported and unresolved.

This state of affairs was recognized by both BT Design (the BT IT services delivery organization) and BT Group Property (the customer). BT's application management costs were increasing sharply and, at the same time, there was a corresponding decrease in trust in an important BT function. BT decided to rationalize their systems by putting together an enterprise architecture framework and standardizing the application development.

 

BT UniApp Framework


BT Procurement worked with BT Enterprise IT. BT Procurement's strategy was systems rationalization, service orientation, and agile delivery, while delivering a radically improved but lower-cost service to the customer. The new architecture of the UniApp is designed to break away from the dictates of IT fashion, to exploit BT's wider software investments, and become a foundation for reducing IT expenditure.

The new UniApp architecture provides BT's business support operations with a standards-based, resilient, and scalable platform from which to deliver IT services to the wider business. Most importantly, it provides a sustainable platform that can accommodate the broadest range of human and automated business processes and workflows within its scope (BT Real Estate in the first instance, but applicable to any other niche business support operation without a dedicated vendor-supported software stack). BT put together the Fusion Middleware-based UniApp Framework to provide a rapid, business process-led development environment, methodology, and delivery capability to solve this critical business problem. The UniApp Framework is built along the same principles as prescribed by OEAF.

BT laid out the golden rules. Take a look how they compare with OEAF principles described previously:

OEAF principle

BT UniApp golden Rule

Simple

Keep it simple! There are three layers to the UniApp—Where the data is stored, how it gets there, and what people need to see.

The Database WILL use a Single Schema.

There will be ONE Schema per UniApp Platform.

A single Security model will apply to each UniApp Platform.

Start With Business

These are Platforms for innovation, able to bring SaaS to the BT Group community and transform expectations of its IT systems. Innovate with them!

Leverage Existing Assets

UniApp will ONLY be used where customization of a COTS ORACLE package would become intrusive and provide a poor user experience.

We will NOT duplicate functionality provided by other Platforms, including the EMP integration Architecture.

A quick look inside the UniApp Framework

The BT UniApp is a three-layered architecture separating the user experience/page flow from the workflow and data layers. The user experience is based on the Oracle Application Development Framework, presented to the user by the Oracle WebCenter Framework. The workflow element is handled by Oracle SOA Suite for both human (BPEL for People) and systems workflow and integration. The database layer is, as one would expect, entirely abstracted from the user, although with very strong governance from a design and development perspective. This provides BT with a rich, comprehensive, and robust environment in which to design, build, and deploy Web 2.0 applications to meet requirements in the BT Enterprise Management space, where no off-the-shelf Oracle ERP applications are available (see the following figure).

BT was able to wrap this approach in a rigorous governance structure and process that allowed the organization to evaluate the applicability of the solution to a given problem. That process ensures that Oracle ERP applications are evaluated first, eliminating duplication of functionality.

The principles of the UniApp (which are maintained through the aforementioned governance process) stress the need to leverage the core native capabilities of the Oracle products that make up the components of the UniApp. When required functionality cannot be met with these core products, and a compromise is required, the compromise will always comply with the architectural principles set out for the UniApp. In practice, the need for user stories based on such compromises rarely occurs; the agile process reveals what the user really wants. This stands in sharp contrast to the previous approach, in which users stated not only what functionality they wanted, but also how the functionality would be implemented. The agile approach removes preconceptions from the design process and allows the capabilities of the components to be demonstrated. The long-term cost reduction benefits to the organization from maintaining a standards-based approach outweigh the short-term needs of an individual delivery. The aim is composition not customization.

Benefits realized by British Telecom

BT's solution took about five months to build, using an agile methodology implemented by a team of four onshore and 10 off-shore developers. The BT Buildings website records over 40,000 hits per day, and the solution supports over 40 key BT Property processes, including those related to critical safety and security functions.

 

Process improvement at Pardee Homes


Now let's take a look at another example in which principles of Fusion development were put into practice.

Pardee Homes, a major home builder in California, has been building award-winning homes and neighborhoods for more than 87 years. To support their business, Pardee Homes continues to innovate and strengthen their IT system by investing in the latest and greatest technologies.

The company chose to overhaul its entire IT system with an upgraded ERP system, and new sales, options, warranty, and scheduling systems. The overhaul also included enabling seven disparate systems to talk to each other in real time, supporting about twenty cross-application transaction types. Pardee's requirements included support for over a thousand concurrent transactions while guaranteeing a reliable message delivery. Also required was the ability to view the status of these transactions across various applications, with an easy recovery process in case of delivery errors.

Pardee Homes also wanted to automate its purchase order and invoice approval process. Automated document scanning and approval workflow initiation were to be included, providing users with task lists and visibility into the documents that needed their approval.

Overall, the solution had to be flexible and able to accommodate future systems with the minimal effort. Utilizing industry's leading technologies and methodologies was crucial to this solution in order to allow Pardee Homes to maintain its leadership in the home-building industry.

Four steps to Fusion development

Pardee Homes adopted the Fusion development approach to assemble its solution, leveraging components of Oracle Fusion Middleware, including Oracle BPA Suite, Oracle BPEL Process Manager, Oracle Web Services Manager, Oracle ADF, and Oracle Application Server:

  1. 1. Model and analyze: At a very early stage, Pardee Homes invited key business stakeholders to partner with IT team members to map out their existing enterprise-wide processes using Oracle BPA Suite, shifting the focus and concentration to process improvement. This facilitated process alignment with corporate goals and strategy, establishing a corporate-wide framework and repository of processes for land development, purchasing, finance, accounting, sales, and options. This approach enhanced employee awareness and the visibility of business processes, promoting business process analysis, optimization, and improvement. It also supported business process transformation and seamless integration with technology by leveraging Oracle BPEL for process execution.

  1. 2. Create Service Layer: The next step was to design and develop a layer of reusable services to enable integration and workflow automation. This involved standardizing the entities used across the enterprise, identifying the business events in each system, and building the services that would be required in each system. This layer also included the ability to secure the services, and leveraged SOA governance to maintain and organize the SOA artifacts. Pardee Homes chose to use the Oracle Application Integration Architecture (AIA) methodology to identity Enterprise Business Objects, Enterprise Business Services, and Enterprise Business Flows. Oracle BPEL served as the Enterprise glue, listening to Business Events across systems and then routing the messages to the target systems. Oracle Web Services Manager provided the pluggable security layer around each system service, allowing each service call to be authenticated and callable only from BPEL. The SOA-based interaction with other components of the solution provided the benefits that come with an SOA-based environment in terms of maintenance, flexibility, scalability, and reusability among the services exposed.

  1. 3. Enable visibility: By leveraging business events and sensors, Pardee Homes enhanced the visibility of the users into the integration across the enterprise and, more importantly, provided insight into integration errors. This enabled business users to monitor the health of the integration and take corrective action if a specific integration process failed. Also, users gained increased visibility into the automated purchase order and invoice approval process by using Oracle Human Workflow and its integration to the existing document management system. Reports provided to management identified task processing bottlenecks for quick resolution. SOA Governance provided visibility into all SOA artifacts and impact analysis of any changes.

  2. 4. Build Rich UI: Two dashboards were developed using Oracle ADF. The first provided users with a real-time view to monitor transactions as they occur across the seven disparate systems that comprise the enterprise. This dashboard included features to resubmit or reinitiate failed transactions; users can also search for specific transactions using known business keys. This helps analyze the overall productivity and identify any bottlenecks in the flows, and also provides an easy way to search, monitor transactions, and recover failed transactions. The second dashboard provided users with a personalized view of their workflow tasks, bringing together documents from the FileNet content management system, purchase order and invoice data from the ERP application, and task information from Oracle Human workflow. This dashboard offered users a seamless UI experience in a rich Web 2.0 environment. Both dashboards leverage several of the reusable services described above.

The following table summarizes the Fusion development approach adopted by Pardee Homes.

Fusion development cycle

Pardee Homes approach

This new solution enables the business to adjust quickly to market conditions when processes change. New sales are now immediately reflected in the customer service system. The completion of option construction is immediately reflected in the Vendor Portal, allowing vendors to bill quickly.

 

Summary


This chapter described and illustrated two approaches, Fusion Development (an application development process) and Oracle Enterprise Architecture (an architecture development framework and process). British Telecom's UniApp Framework and Pardee Homes' integration approach bear close resemblance to OEAF and Fusion development principles respectively. Fusion Development offers a new approach to assembling, rather than coding new business applications. Together with OEAF, Fusion Development offers an end-to-end approach to architect and build new composite applications that can be quickly developed, rapidly changed, and easily managed.

About the Authors

  • Harish Gaur

    Harish Gaur has more than 13 years of experience in the enterprise software industry including 7+ years at Oracle. He is currently the Director of Product Management for Fusion Middleware at Oracle. In his current role, he works closely with strategic customers implementing SOA & BPM using Oracle Fusion Middleware. He is co-author of BPEL Cookbook (2007) and Fusion Middleware Patterns (Sept 2010)

    Before Oracle, he worked as a Solution Specialist with Vitria Technology educating customers about the benefits of Business Process Management. Prior to that, he helped Fortune 500 companies architect scalable integration solutions using EAI tools like webMethods and CrossWorlds (now IBM).

    Harish holds an engineering degree in Computer Science and is an MBA from Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley.

    Contact Harish Gaur

    Browse publications by this author
  • Markus Zirn

    Markus Zirn is a Senior Director of Product Management for Oracle Fusion Middleware. In this role he heads the Strategic Customer Program, where he works with Oracle's leading and most innovative middleware customers. He has been part of the Enterprise Software industry for more than 10 years, including roles as Vice President of Product Marketing and part of the founding team of QUIQ and as a Management Consultant of Booz Allen & Hamilton's Silicon Valley High Tech Practice. Markus' passion for Service-Oriented Architecture (SOA) and BPEL stems both from practical experience designing and optimizing business processes as part of process reengineering projects and from being part of the advent of "software as a service" before web services became mainstream. He holds a Masters of Electrical Engineering from the University of Karlsruhe and is an alumnus of the Tripartite program, a joint European degree from the University of Karlsruhe, Germany, the University of Southampton, UK, and ESIEE, France.


    Contact Markus Zirn

    Browse publications by this author
  • Srikant Subramaniam

    Srikant is a product manager for Oracle Fusion Middleware. He is responsible for enhancing and evangelizing best practices for the middleware platform as it relates to Oracle Applications.

    Browse publications by this author
  • Nam Doan-Huy

    Nam Doan-Huy is a Senior Manager in IT at Wind River Systems, a world leader in embedded and mobile software. In his role, Nam has responsibility for Oracle E-Business Suite architecture, Fusion Middleware including SOA, portals, Business Intelligence, and enterprise databases, supporting a wide range of business units. Prior to joining Wind River, Nam worked for a number of years in consulting as a technical lead for ERP implementations.

    Browse publications by this author
  • YiHong Xu

    Yihong Xu, Wind River's Web Architect, has been with Wind River for 10 years. She started her career as a quality engineer and later switched to working with web technologies in 2003. As Web Architect, Yihong is responsible for developing web strategy, including translating business requirements into use cases, identifying and evaluating tools, selecting hardware and software platforms, and ensuring coherency across IT's heterogeneous web systems. Yihong has a Masters degree in Electrical Engineering.

    Browse publications by this author
  • Narshimha Rao Kondapaka

    Rao is a Project Manager in IT and has been with Wind River for 4 years. Rao has 11+ years of experience working with Oracle technologies and applications. He began his career as an Oracle Applications technical developer and switched to become an expert functional Business Analyst. Rao was recently promoted to Project Manager and played a key role in implementing the Online Support portal. Rao has a Master's degree in Computer Applications.

    Browse publications by this author
  • Melody Wood

    Melody is a member of the Fusion Middleware Platform Product Management team, where she focuses on SOA and Web 2.0 customer deployment patterns. Melody joined Oracle in 1996, originally holding various partner management roles, where her increasing technical focus on Oracle product integrations across the database and middleware product stacks eventually led to her current role.

    Browse publications by this author
  • Matjaz B. Juric

    Matjaz B. Juric holds a PhD in computer and information science. He is a full-time professor at the University of Ljubljana and heads the Cloud Computing and SOA Competence Centre (http://www.soa.si). Matjaz is an Oracle ACE Director and has been designated Java Champion and IBM Champion. He has more than 20 years of work experience.

    He has authored and coauthored Do More with SOA Integration: Best of Packt, WS-BPEL 2.0 for SOA Composite Applications with IBM WebSphere 7, Oracle Fusion Middleware Patterns, Business Process Driven SOA using BPMN and BPEL, Business Process Execution Language for Web Services (both English and French editions), BPEL Cookbook (which was awarded the best SOA book in 2007 by SOA World Journal), SOA Approach to Integration, Professional J2EE EAI, Professional EJB, J2EE Design Patterns Applied, and Visual Basic .NET Serialization Handbook.

    He has published chapters in More Java Gems, Cambridge University Press, and in Technology Supporting Business Solutions, Nova Science Publishers, Inc. His work has also been published in several journals and magazines and presented at conferences.

    Browse publications by this author
  • Ross Sharman

    Ross is the Technical Director for Knowledge Global, where his work architecting and building the EMMA sustainability solution helped him to win the 2009 Green IT Architect Award from Oracle Magazine. Ross has an extensive background in technology and in electrical and electronic engineering, and has worked in large integration and Business Intelligence projects in Australia, the US, and Europe.

    Browse publications by this author
  • Juliana Button

    Juliana is Director of Product Management for Oracle Fusion Middleware. Since 1992, Juliana has held various technical and management positions in Oracle Corporation in Australia and at Oracle Headquarters in Redwood Shores. Her responsibilities include showcasing worldwide customer success with Oracle Application Grid products, as part of the Oracle Fusion Middleware Strategic Customer Program.

    Browse publications by this author
  • Matt Miller

    Matt Miller is Applications Director for Europe, Middle East, and Africa at GroupM. At the time of writing, he was Head of Business Analysts and Testing at Motability Operations and was also responsible for delivery of the Vehicle Remarketing technology project detailed in this book. Throughout his career Matt has worked in a wide variety or technical roles with several large media companies, including IPC Media, Associated Newspapers, and EMI Music.

    Browse publications by this author
  • Mark Simpson

    Mark Simpson, in addition to being an Oracle ACE Director, is Consultancy Director at Griffiths Waite, where he leads the UK-based Fusion Middleware development team with a focus on user experience, BPM, and SOA. He has worked with these technologies for over 10 years, having successfully delivered the first UK Oracle BPEL project back in 2004 and then the first BAM dashboard in 2005 for an innovative financial services organization. He is a frequent conference speaker, has received numerous awards, and actively supports the UKOUG and EMEA SOA Community. Recently, Mark was the lead architect on a design-focused ADF and WebCenter project. This project has reignited his passion for great UX and delivering increased customer insight through data visualization using SOA to ensure consistency in processes, services, and data.

    Browse publications by this author
  • Kiran Dattani

    Kiran is Director of Archtecture Finance and Procurement for a major pharmaceutical company, where he is responsible for Global Architecture and Enterprise Integration projects. An accomplished speaker, he is a recognized expert in enterprise integration and supply chains in the life sciences and manufacturing industries.

    Browse publications by this author
  • Milind Pandit

    Milind is an SOA Architect with Oracle Consulting Services, where he assists customers in deploying SOA-based architecture. He has eleven years of experience in software design, development, and implementation involving Enterprise Application Integration, J2EE, and Object-Oriented Analysis and Design.

    Browse publications by this author
  • Nikhilesh Chitnis

    Nikhilesh is Senior Sales Consultant for Oracle Fusion Middleware. He is responsible for positioning and demonstrating the value of Oracle's middleware suite of products to global customers. Nikhilesh has extensive expertise in the design, development, and implementation of software solutions across multiple industry domains.

    Browse publications by this author
  • Sandeep Banerjie

    Sandeep is Senior Director of Product Management for Oracle Fusion Middleware. His responsibilities include developing and executing Fusion Middleware product and go-to-market strategies for Oracle and non-Oracle applications across all industries. Sandeep has 17+ years of IT experience and is a frequent speaker on ERP, CRM, SCM, SOA, BPM, and Cloud Computing.

    Browse publications by this author
  • Mark Farabaugh

    Mark is a VP of IT at DJO in Vista, CA., leading DJO's multi-year program to consolidate all legacy ERP applications to a global single instance of Oracle eBS R12. Mark has more than 20 years of experience as an IT professional, and has focused on implementing Oracle enterprise applications such as ERP, BI, CRM, an FP&A for large multi-national corporations.

    Browse publications by this author
  • Sri Ayyeppen

    Sri is the co-founder and CTO at Keste, an Oracle Platinum Technology Partner, where he is responsible for the leading teams that deliver complex solutions with Oracle Applications, Technology and Infrastructure. Sri was recently recognized as one of Oracle's Deputy CTOs for the year 2010.

    Browse publications by this author
  • John Chung

    John is Arcturus Realty Corporation's VP of IT and has over 10 years' experience in the real estate industry, with diversified knowledge in technology and programming covering a broad range of languages and environments.

    Browse publications by this author
  • Mike Blackmore

    Mike, Enterprise Architect at British Telecom, is responsible for leading the high-level technical relationship between BT and Oracle, engaging with BT and Oracle teams to make successful product and technology decisions.

    Browse publications by this author
  • Hamza Jahangir

    Hamza is a director of Enterprise Architecture at Oracle, and is co-author of Applied Oracle Security: Developing Secure Database and Middleware Environments (McGraw-Hill Osborne Media).

    Browse publications by this author
  • Basheer Khan

    Basheer is an Oracle ACE Director and president and founder of Irvine, California-based Innowave Technology. Basheer was named Oracle Magazine's Integration Architect of the Year 2006 and Oracle Application Users Group (OAUG) Member of the Year in 2003.

    Browse publications by this author
  • Rex Thexton

    Rex Thexton is a managing director, and is a key leader of PricewaterhouseCoopers' Security and IdM practice in Oracle environments. Rex is an experienced IT professional with over 18 years of application development and IT management expertise. He has a proven track record for implementing strategic projects through a combination of effective relationship building with business leaders and technological aptitude. He was named and recognized as one of Oracle’s Deputy CTOs, a select group of practitioners in North America.

    Browse publications by this author
  • Nishidhdha Shah

    Nishidhdha Shah works as senior consultant with PricewaterhouseCoopers. He has 10 years of experience in security and identity management. He holds CISSP and CISA credentials since 2006. He won ISC2 Cyber Security Awareness contest 2007 for his presentation on "Approach to security". Besides Schneider National, he also did a couple of large-scale OIM and ORM implementation in banking and retail.

    Browse publications by this author