(MCTS): Microsoft Windows Small Business Server 2011 Standard, Configuring (70-169) Certification Guide

By Drew Hills (MCITP MCSE DCNE SBSC BEngTech (Elec) ) , Robert Crane (BE MBA MCP)
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  1. Installing and Setting Up Windows Small Business Server (SBS) 2011 Standard

About this book

Microsoft Windows Small Business Server (SBS) 2011 Standard is an affordable, all-in-one solution that reduces complexity and increases manageability of server technology in a small business environment. Microsoft Windows Small Business Server 2011 Standard, Configuring (70-169) is the certification exam for information technology (IT) professionals who work in or consult with small businesses that use Windows Small Business Server Standard 2011.

"(MCTS): Microsoft Windows Small Business Server 2011 Standard, Configuring (70-169) Certification Guide" will show you how to prepare for and pass the Microsoft Windows Small Business Server 2011 Standard, Configuring (70-169) exam and become a Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist (MCTS).

Packed with practical examples and Q&As, "(MCTS): Microsoft Windows Small Business Server 2011 Standard, Configuring (70-169) Certification Guide" covers the key skills in the exam and starts by showing you how to install and set up Windows Small Business Server (SBS) 2011 Standard. The book then dives into topics such as configuring Remote Access, configuring and managing Messaging and Collaboration, managing Users, Computers, and Printers, managing Health and Security and Advanced Configuration amongst others. Additional practical resources are also included that will enable you to approach the Microsoft Windows Small Business Server 2011 Standard, Configuring (70-169) exam with confidence, including certification test taking tips and tricks.

Publication date:
May 2012
Publisher
Packt
Pages
214
ISBN
9781849685160

 

Chapter 1. Installing and Setting Up Windows Small Business Server (SBS) 2011 Standard

One of the key elements in the certification process is knowing how to correctly install Windows Small Business Server (SBS) 2011 Standard. There are many issues here that need to be considered and correctly addressed, and any exam will test these issues extensively in order to ensure that you can demonstrate your knowledge in this area. You should expect to see a significant amount of installation questions during the certification exam.

Knowing how to install Windows SBS 2011 Standard is the first step in learning more about the product. The key to a successful installation is preparation and following a standard process. This chapter will take you through the preparation requirements as well as walk you through the installation process.

In this chapter we shall cover the following topics:

  • Preparing for a Windows SBS 2011 Standard installation

  • Installing Windows SBS 2011 Standard

  • Preparing for a migration

  • Installing and migrating to Windows SBS 2011 Standard

  • Configuring the network infrastructure

  • Test your knowledge

Preparing for a Windows SBS 2011 Standard installation

Before you can start installing your software, you first need to ensure that you have completed the preparation. This will typically involve:

  • Obtaining the appropriate hardware

  • Configuring the hardware for the installation

  • Determining the settings for your installation

  • Preparing the installation media

  • Determining the type of installation you'll be doing

Basic installation

The most likely place that you will start when working with Windows SBS 2011 Standard will be completing a basic installation. Such an installation is usually onto new hardware and simply follows the default options. It provides you with a base from which you can build your knowledge of the more complex methods of installing SBS.

Components of Windows SBS 2011

Windows SBS 2011 Standard is composed of a number of standard Microsoft technologies:

  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard

  • Exchange Server 2010 Standard SP1

  • SharePoint Foundation 2010

  • Windows Software Update Services 3.0 SP2

  • Remote Web Access

  • Windows SBS Console

  • Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 Express

However, Windows SBS 2011 Standard is not just a collection of these standard elements, it is the tight integration of all of these components together on a single server using wizards to greatly reduce the workload required to maintain the system.

A Windows SBS 2011 Standard server is managed through a special console that permits easy access to many of the most common management features of the environment. Yet, there will be cases where you need to dive under the hood to make changes.

To extend the functionality of the Windows SBS network, you can purchase Windows SBS 2011 Premium Add-on packs. Each add-on pack contains a license for Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard Edition as well as a license for SQL Server 2008 R2 Standard for Small Business Edition. This allows the implementation of all Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard technologies including Hyper-V and Remote Desktop Services.

You can purchase as many Windows SBS 2011 Premium Add-on packs as you require for your network.

Hardware requirements

Windows SBS 2011 Standard requires hardware to operate. Being a server-based operating system, it requires a certain level of hardware to adequately serve the network and its users. Given that this hardware will be the heart of your network, it is critical that it meet (and hopefully exceed) a minimum level of requirement. Anything below this level will impact the reliability and performance of the whole network and reduce the productivity of users.

Obtaining the appropriate hardware

The recommended minimum specifications for Windows SBS 2011 Standard are:

Hardware

Minimum requirement

Processor

Quad core 2 GHz 64-bit (x64) or faster.

1 socket (4 sockets maximum).

Physical memory (RAM)

8 GB.

10 GB recommended (32 GB maximum).

Storage capacity

120 GB.

DVD ROM drive

DVD ROM drive.

Network adapter

One 10/100 Ethernet adapter.

Monitor and video adapter

Super VGA (SVGA) monitor and video adapter with 1024 x 768 or higher resolution.

Network devices

A router or firewall device that supports IPv4 NAT.

Internet connection

Windows SBS 2011 Standard requires that you connect the server to the Internet.

Optional network devices

Device required by your Internet service provider (ISP) to connect to the Internet.

One or more switches to connect computers and other devices to the local network.

Fax modem

Fax services require a fax modem.

It is also important to note the following that are not supported by Windows SBS 2011 Standard:

  • Multiple Network Interface card (NIC)

  • Tape drive

Software requirements

There are limitations to Windows SBS 2011 Standard and it is important to note the following:

  • There is only support for a single server running Windows SBS in a domain. Additional servers are supported as domain controllers or member servers

  • Windows SBS 2011 Standard cannot be licensed for more than a total of 75 clients—including users and devices

  • The Windows SBS 2011 Standard Server must be the root of the Active Directory forest and can't have trusts with other domains or forests

  • You cannot run Windows SBS 2011 Standard as a Remote Desktop Services Session host server

  • Windows SBS 2011 Standard doesn't support the use of tape drives

  • Windows SBS 2011 Standard does not include any additional firewall apart from that which is part of Windows Server 2008 R2

Note

Additional aspects you will have to consider:

Windows SBS 2011 Standard does not come with any inbuilt anti-virus or anti-malware protection. There are a range of third-party solutions that can be considered.

Firewall requirements

Some previous versions of Windows SBS included a software firewall (typically Microsoft Internet Security and Accelerator (ISA) Server). Windows SBS 2011 Standard, like Windows SBS 2008, does not include any independent firewall software except for the inbuilt firewall that comes with Windows Server 2008 R2. It is Microsoft's expectation that a separate firewall device will be installed separately from the Windows SBS 2011 Standard Server.

In most cases, this firewall device will be a hardware appliance that also incorporates a broadband router. Because Windows SBS 2011 Standard can utilize remote access and SMTP e-mails, it is important that this appliance supports the ability to port forward to the Windows SBS 2011 Standard server. It is also recommended that this device be a "business grade" device that not only supports filtering and reporting but also Active Directory (AD) integration.

Configuring hardware for the installation

The base of any network is the hardware that it is installed on and it is therefore always recommended that you take the time to ensure it is properly configured prior to the installation of any software.

It is strongly recommended that you update all firmware of hardware peripherals. You should also download the latest software drivers for your hardware and have these ready during the installation.

If you want to configure remote access and e-mail access to your network, you will need to create the following minimum port forwarding rules in your router:

  • Port 25 for e-mail

  • Port 443 for Remote access

  • Port 987 for SharePoint access

Although it is not recommended, you may also want to configure other remote port access to the server. However, the previously mentioned ports are the typical minimum you require for a Windows SBS 2011 Standard installation.

Even though Windows SBS 2011 Standard has the ability to function as a public web server, accessible directly from the Internet, it is not recommended that it be configured this way. This is for two simple reasons, firstly it reduces the security of your server, given that port 80 is commonly attacked by hackers and secondly it can reduce the bandwidth available, as well as reducing the amount of server resources available to users on your network as anonymous external requests compete with internal requests for network bandwidth. In the end, it is much easier to host any public facing website with a third-party hosting provider. Most have plans that are very cost effective.

If you are planning to use RAID array configuration on your server, then this should be configured and built prior to any software being installed on the server. There are many different ways of configuring RAID and each has its advantages and disadvantages; however, it is not within the scope of the book to go into these.

Once the installation is complete, you'll probably want to configure remote access as well as update your server with the latest patches. To do this, you'll need an active Internet connection.

One of the topics that will be covered at a later stage is that of virtualization. This basically allows you to run a number of virtualized "guest" machines on a single "host" machine. In this way you are able to reduce the number of physical machines required and improve the flexibility of the installation. However, virtualization requires a level of expertise that will not be detailed here directly. What is important to remember is that Windows SBS 2011 Standard supports the ability to be a "virtualized" guest on a host machine, it does not however support being the host machine and running "virtualized" guests. The assumption here will be that if you wish to use Windows SBS 2011 Standard as a "virtualized" guest, then this will already have been set up and configured prior to the installation.

 

Preparing for a Windows SBS 2011 Standard installation


Before you can start installing your software, you first need to ensure that you have completed the preparation. This will typically involve:

  • Obtaining the appropriate hardware

  • Configuring the hardware for the installation

  • Determining the settings for your installation

  • Preparing the installation media

  • Determining the type of installation you'll be doing

Basic installation

The most likely place that you will start when working with Windows SBS 2011 Standard will be completing a basic installation. Such an installation is usually onto new hardware and simply follows the default options. It provides you with a base from which you can build your knowledge of the more complex methods of installing SBS.

Components of Windows SBS 2011

Windows SBS 2011 Standard is composed of a number of standard Microsoft technologies:

  • Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard

  • Exchange Server 2010 Standard SP1

  • SharePoint Foundation 2010

  • Windows Software Update Services 3.0 SP2

  • Remote Web Access

  • Windows SBS Console

  • Microsoft SQL Server 2008 R2 Express

However, Windows SBS 2011 Standard is not just a collection of these standard elements, it is the tight integration of all of these components together on a single server using wizards to greatly reduce the workload required to maintain the system.

A Windows SBS 2011 Standard server is managed through a special console that permits easy access to many of the most common management features of the environment. Yet, there will be cases where you need to dive under the hood to make changes.

To extend the functionality of the Windows SBS network, you can purchase Windows SBS 2011 Premium Add-on packs. Each add-on pack contains a license for Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard Edition as well as a license for SQL Server 2008 R2 Standard for Small Business Edition. This allows the implementation of all Windows Server 2008 R2 Standard technologies including Hyper-V and Remote Desktop Services.

You can purchase as many Windows SBS 2011 Premium Add-on packs as you require for your network.

Hardware requirements

Windows SBS 2011 Standard requires hardware to operate. Being a server-based operating system, it requires a certain level of hardware to adequately serve the network and its users. Given that this hardware will be the heart of your network, it is critical that it meet (and hopefully exceed) a minimum level of requirement. Anything below this level will impact the reliability and performance of the whole network and reduce the productivity of users.

Obtaining the appropriate hardware

The recommended minimum specifications for Windows SBS 2011 Standard are:

Hardware

Minimum requirement

Processor

Quad core 2 GHz 64-bit (x64) or faster.

1 socket (4 sockets maximum).

Physical memory (RAM)

8 GB.

10 GB recommended (32 GB maximum).

Storage capacity

120 GB.

DVD ROM drive

DVD ROM drive.

Network adapter

One 10/100 Ethernet adapter.

Monitor and video adapter

Super VGA (SVGA) monitor and video adapter with 1024 x 768 or higher resolution.

Network devices

A router or firewall device that supports IPv4 NAT.

Internet connection

Windows SBS 2011 Standard requires that you connect the server to the Internet.

Optional network devices

Device required by your Internet service provider (ISP) to connect to the Internet.

One or more switches to connect computers and other devices to the local network.

Fax modem

Fax services require a fax modem.

It is also important to note the following that are not supported by Windows SBS 2011 Standard:

  • Multiple Network Interface card (NIC)

  • Tape drive

Software requirements

There are limitations to Windows SBS 2011 Standard and it is important to note the following:

  • There is only support for a single server running Windows SBS in a domain. Additional servers are supported as domain controllers or member servers

  • Windows SBS 2011 Standard cannot be licensed for more than a total of 75 clients—including users and devices

  • The Windows SBS 2011 Standard Server must be the root of the Active Directory forest and can't have trusts with other domains or forests

  • You cannot run Windows SBS 2011 Standard as a Remote Desktop Services Session host server

  • Windows SBS 2011 Standard doesn't support the use of tape drives

  • Windows SBS 2011 Standard does not include any additional firewall apart from that which is part of Windows Server 2008 R2

Note

Additional aspects you will have to consider:

Windows SBS 2011 Standard does not come with any inbuilt anti-virus or anti-malware protection. There are a range of third-party solutions that can be considered.

Firewall requirements

Some previous versions of Windows SBS included a software firewall (typically Microsoft Internet Security and Accelerator (ISA) Server). Windows SBS 2011 Standard, like Windows SBS 2008, does not include any independent firewall software except for the inbuilt firewall that comes with Windows Server 2008 R2. It is Microsoft's expectation that a separate firewall device will be installed separately from the Windows SBS 2011 Standard Server.

In most cases, this firewall device will be a hardware appliance that also incorporates a broadband router. Because Windows SBS 2011 Standard can utilize remote access and SMTP e-mails, it is important that this appliance supports the ability to port forward to the Windows SBS 2011 Standard server. It is also recommended that this device be a "business grade" device that not only supports filtering and reporting but also Active Directory (AD) integration.

Configuring hardware for the installation

The base of any network is the hardware that it is installed on and it is therefore always recommended that you take the time to ensure it is properly configured prior to the installation of any software.

It is strongly recommended that you update all firmware of hardware peripherals. You should also download the latest software drivers for your hardware and have these ready during the installation.

If you want to configure remote access and e-mail access to your network, you will need to create the following minimum port forwarding rules in your router:

  • Port 25 for e-mail

  • Port 443 for Remote access

  • Port 987 for SharePoint access

Although it is not recommended, you may also want to configure other remote port access to the server. However, the previously mentioned ports are the typical minimum you require for a Windows SBS 2011 Standard installation.

Even though Windows SBS 2011 Standard has the ability to function as a public web server, accessible directly from the Internet, it is not recommended that it be configured this way. This is for two simple reasons, firstly it reduces the security of your server, given that port 80 is commonly attacked by hackers and secondly it can reduce the bandwidth available, as well as reducing the amount of server resources available to users on your network as anonymous external requests compete with internal requests for network bandwidth. In the end, it is much easier to host any public facing website with a third-party hosting provider. Most have plans that are very cost effective.

If you are planning to use RAID array configuration on your server, then this should be configured and built prior to any software being installed on the server. There are many different ways of configuring RAID and each has its advantages and disadvantages; however, it is not within the scope of the book to go into these.

Once the installation is complete, you'll probably want to configure remote access as well as update your server with the latest patches. To do this, you'll need an active Internet connection.

One of the topics that will be covered at a later stage is that of virtualization. This basically allows you to run a number of virtualized "guest" machines on a single "host" machine. In this way you are able to reduce the number of physical machines required and improve the flexibility of the installation. However, virtualization requires a level of expertise that will not be detailed here directly. What is important to remember is that Windows SBS 2011 Standard supports the ability to be a "virtualized" guest on a host machine, it does not however support being the host machine and running "virtualized" guests. The assumption here will be that if you wish to use Windows SBS 2011 Standard as a "virtualized" guest, then this will already have been set up and configured prior to the installation.

 

Installing Windows SBS 2011 Standard


Once you have all the hardware and software prepared for an installation, you have to choose between two methods of installation:

  1. 1. If you are planning to install Windows SBS 2011 Standard and use a new Active Directory, then you should complete the manual installation option.

  2. 2. If however, you need to maintain an existing Active Directory (users, contacts, and so on), then you should complete the migration method.

It is very important to decide up front which installation method you'll use because once you start with one method you can't revert to the other method.

Manual installation

The most common method of installing Windows SBS 2011 Standard is by interactively following along with the prompts as the software is being installed. This requires your presence in front of the server to make the appropriate selections and enter any information that is required during the installation process.

Determining the settings for your installation

You need to consider a few things before ploughing into your Windows SBS 2011 Standard installation:

  • What is going to be the IP scheme for your network?

  • What is the domain name going to be?

  • What do you want to call the administrator account?

  • Who the domain users are and what rights they will have?

  • What network shares need to be created and how they will be configured and secured.

  • What disk partition sizes do you plan to use? By default, Windows SBS 2011 Standard will install everything onto the first disk in your system. It is recommended that you allocate at least 120 GB for this initial partition. However, 150 GB is probably a better allocation given the size of hard disk storage these days. Beyond the initial drive, it is good practice to have other partitions available on your system for data storage to provide separation from your program files and the Windows system files.

It is recommended that you make sure to document all this information before you commence the installation of Windows SBS 2011 Standard.

Preparing the installation media

How do you plan to install the Windows SBS 2011 Standard software? From a DVD or an ISO file? It is always recommended that you create a backup copy of your installation media.

Normally, along with your media will come a set of installation keys. You won't need these during the installation process, but once the software has been installed you should activate the installation using these keys.

Before you commence the installation, you need to determine the following:

  • Whether you'll be performing a migration or standard installation?

  • How any data will be migrated onto the server?

  • Are you planning to automate the process using an answer file?

Although both installation methods require the Windows SBS 2011 Standard software, the process through which the installation is completed can vary markedly.

Standard installation

In the situation where you do not have an existing Active Directory domain controller or you do not wish to retain the information in an existing Active Directory, you can perform a standard installation of Windows SBS 2011 Standard.

Commence the installation by booting from bootable media. If you are using a DVD, then you will need to ensure that your server is set to boot from the DVD drive.

At the initial screen you will need to set the localization settings for your installation by selecting the Language to install, Time and currency format, and Keyboard or input method. Once these have been selected, click the Next button. You will be presented with an Install now option. Click this to proceed:

You will then need to accept the Software License Terms and then click Next to continue.

Next, you'll be asked whether you want to perform an Upgrade or a Custom (advanced) installation. Select Custom (advanced):

You will then be presented with a list of drives onto which to install Windows SBS 2011 Standard. If your drive isn't displayed, you may need to select the Load Driver option to install the driver for your hardware:

Click Next to commence the installation. You will not be prompted further as the installation files are first copied to the drive, expanded, and then installed.

Once the base Windows Server installation has completed, the Windows SBS 2011 Standard portion will commence. To commence the Windows SBS 2011 Standard installation, there will need to be a functional Network Interface Card (NIC) in the system. You will have a chance to install any required networking drivers if Windows doesn't load a built-in driver for your network card.

At the next screen you will select whether you wish to perform a Clean Install or a Server Migration. In this case select Clean Install to proceed:

You will next have to verify the clock and time zone settings:

Next will be the server network configuration screen where you will select how you want the server to detect the network settings. You can choose from Automatically detect the network settings or Manually choose the network settings as follows where you can specify the IP address for the server. Automatically detect the network settings is not recommended.

You will then be prompted to either Go online and get the most recent updates (recommended) or Do not get the most recent installation updates. It is generally not recommended that you install any updates as it may cause issues with the installation process in the case where newer files are downloaded that conflict with other installation files. It is generally recommended that you update the server after the installation has completed.

You will now be prompted to enter the Company information. Even though you are not required to complete the fields here, it is generally recommended that you complete this screen as the information is utilized in a variety of locations on Windows SBS 2011 Standard:

Continuing on will present you with the Personalize your server and your network screen. Here you will need to insert a Server name and an Internal domain name. Best practice here is to keep the names as short and descriptive as possible, while also avoiding special characters (such as %, ^, &, and so on).

You will then need to Add a network administrator account for the network. You will notice that any password you enter must conform to the complexity standard set by Windows SBS 2011 Standard. This means the password must be at least eight characters long and contain at least three of the following four types of characters: A-Z, a-z, 0-9, and symbols:

You should now see the confirmation page displayed with all of the configuration information you just entered. Once you click the Next button, you cannot make any changes to these values. If you do need to make a change, click the Back button to return to that location.

If you click the Next button, the installation will proceed and when complete, the server will reboot and you will be returned to a splash screen indicating the process has completed:

Automated installation—answer file

The answer file was first used with Windows SBS 2003 and continues with Windows SBS 2011 Standard. It is a required item when you are performing a migration from an existing domain, but it's optional for a clean installation. There are some advantages in using an answer file when doing a clean installation as it provides the customization of some portions of the installation that aren't available during the manual process that was previously detailed.

The answer file is generated via an SBS 2011 Answer File Generator tool (sbsafg.exe) which is located in the \tools directory on the Windows SBS 2011 Standard Installation Disc 1.

Simply copy this file (sbsafg.exe) to a local hard disk and double click it to run the tool.

When the tool is run, you will see that you need to select whether the installation is new or a migration, whether you want to get installation updates, or run the installation unattended.

You can also set the time zone, server name, domain name, full DNS name, and company details.

If you leave any of the fields blank then you will be prompted for this information during the installation process.

When complete, simply click the Save As button to save the answer file. The name of the file should be sbsanswerfile.xml:

To use the answer file, it must reside in the root directory of a storage device connected to the server during installation. The easiest way to facilitate this is to copy the answer file to a USB flash drive and insert that drive into the server. If the installation begins, with the USB flash drive in place, the installation process will automatically locate the answer file and proceed to use it during the installation.

If you are installing Windows SBS 2011 Standard on a Hyper-V guest machine, which has no USB available to it, simply use the virtual floppy disk or mount a removable drive, for that Hyper-V machine.

 

Preparing for a migration


In many circumstances, you will be upgrading existing networks that already include a Windows Server running Active Directory. In a majority of cases these will probably be older versions of SBS. In this situation, the business already has a significant investment in users, contacts, computers, among others, that are already managed through an existing Active Directory. Using the migration method, the information in the existing Active Directory can be migrated to the new server environment.

Using the migration method will avoid the need to recreate all these objects in the Active Directory; however, it does bring with it a different set of challenges and a slightly different method of installation.

Overview: Migrating defined

There are a number of reasons you need to consider the migration process as something very different from the default installation. It is important that you understand these differences and the additional information that may be required. Also remember, any migration involves not only the Windows SBS 2011 Standard machine, but also the source server from which you are migrating.

Migration

In situations where there are already existing domain controllers in the network (whether it is an SBS or Windows Server), if you wish to retain the information in the current Active Directory (that is the user names and details), then you will need to perform a migration.

You can migrate to Windows SBS 2011 Standard from the following:

  • Windows SBS 2008

  • Windows SBS 2003

  • Windows Server 2008

  • Windows Server 2003

Preparing the source server for migration

It is important that the server you wish to move information from is ready for this process. In most cases this will mean that work has to be performed on the source server prior to any migration effort. Spending the time completing a few basics will ensure that the source server is in the best condition for the migration process. This will go a long way to ensuring a smooth and painless migration.

Backing up your source server

It cannot be stressed enough, back up your source server before you begin the migration process. If anything goes wrong anywhere during the migration you know you have all your data and you can recover your server.

Installing the most recent service packs and updates

It is a must that the latest service packs be installed on the source server before you start the migration process. If any of the latest service packs are missing, the Migration Preparation Tool will report the problem and ask you to install the appropriate update before proceeding with the migration.

Verifying network configuration

In preparation for the migration, the network must have a router that is the gateway to the Internet. The router must have DHCP disabled and it must also be a firewall device, or have a firewall device installed on the Internet side of it. If you are using SBS 2003 as the source server you must reconfigure the network to use one network card only. If ISA 2004 is installed this will have to be uninstalled before starting the migration process.

Evaluating the health of the source server

If your source server is SBS 2003 or SBS 2008, you can run the Windows SBS Best Practices Analyzer to verify that there are no outstanding issues with you server, network, or domain before you start the migration.

Windows SBS Best Practice Analyzer (BPA)

You run the Windows SBS BPA to verify that there are no issues on the source server, network, or domain before you start the migration.

If the source server is SBS 2003 you should download and run the Windows SBS 2003 BPA, which is located at: http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=5334.

If the source server is SBS 2008 you should download and run the Windows SBS 2008 BPA, which is located at: http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=6231.

After the BPA scan is completed, it presents a list of issues in order of severity. The BPA describes each issue it has encountered, and suggests a solution. Not every issue that is reported by the BPA will affect migration; however, it is important that you solve as many of the issues as possible to ensure a successful migration.

Running the Preparation Tool

The Migration Preparation Tool makes changes to the source server that are necessary to enable the migration to Windows SBS 2011 Standard.

What does the Migration Preparation Tool do to the source server?

For Windows SBS 2003 and Windows Server 2003, it raises the domain and forest functional level of the Active Directory domain and forest. When Windows SBS 2003 is installed, the AD DS domain and forest have the functional level of Microsoft Windows 2000.

Run adprep.exe, which extends the AD DS schema and updates permissions as required, to prepare a forest and domain for a domain controller that is running Windows SBS 2011 Standard. The AD DS schema in Windows SBS 2011 Standard is not the same as the AD DS schema in the previous versions of Windows Servers, including previous versions of the SBS product.

In normal circumstances only one server running Windows SBS is allowed on the network. For Windows SBS 2003 and Windows Server 2003, an update is installed that allows two Windows SBS servers to be on the same network for a maximum of 21 days. This is the time period in which you must complete the migration.

For Windows Server SBS 2008 and Windows Server 2008 only, you must successfully complete a run of the Migration Preparation Tool on the source server within two weeks of installing the Windows SBS 2011 Standard on the destination server. If this is not done, installation in migration mode of Windows SBS 2011 Standard will be blocked.

For Windows SBS 2003 and Windows Server 2003 only, Exchange 2003 is prepared for migration. Exchange server must be converted from mixed mode to native mode for the migration to succeed.

Run the Migration Preparation Tool by completing the following steps:

  1. 1. Insert Windows SBS 2011 Standard DVD1 into the DVD drive of the source server.

  2. 2. After the Windows installation wizard starts, click Tools and double click SourceTool.

  3. 3. At the Windows SBS 2011 Standard installation wizard, click Install the Migration Preparation Tool. A wizard then installs the Migration Preparation Tool of the source server. Once the wizard has completed the installation, it automatically runs and installs the latest updates.

  4. 4. In the Migration Preparation Tool, click I have a backup and am ready to proceed and then click Next.

  5. 5. The Migration Preparation Tool prepares the source domain for the migration by extending the Active Directory Schema. Click Next when the task is complete.

  6. 6. Once the Migration Preparation tool has finished preparing the source domain, it scans the source server to identify potential issues. The two types of issues that can be identified are:

    • Errors: These are issues found on the source server that may stop the migration from proceeding, or cause the migration to fail. These issues must be fixed, following the steps in the description. Then click Scan Again to restart the scan.

    • Warnings: These are issues found on the source server that might cause functional problems during the migration. It is highly recommended that these warnings be fixed, following the steps in the description. Then click Scan Again to restart the scan.

  7. 7. If you haven't already created a migration answer file yet, click Create an Answer File, and complete the instructions one by one.

  8. 8. Click Finish.

  9. 9. When the Migration Preparation Tool finishes, you have to restart the source server before you can start the migration process.

Creating an answer file for migration

What is the purpose of a migration answer file?

  • The answer file starts the migration process to Windows SBS 2011Standard. In fact you have to use an answer file if you wish to have a migration installation to Windows SBS 2011Standard.

  • The answer file provides the information that is automatically entered into the Windows SBS 2011 Standard installation pages.

  • The answer file allows an IT Professional to start the build of the destination server before taking it to the customer's site, for non-migration installations only.

The first step in the process of creating an answer file is to collect the required information:

Information to provide

Description

Clock and time zone settings

If you select Manually set the clock and time zone for the server, the migration will pause, and you will be prompted to enter the correct information.

If you select Use the following time zone, you must manually set the time and date in the server BIOS to the correct settings.

Company Information (optional)

Enter the name and address of the business. This information is entered into your server. You can edit this information at a later time in the SBS Console by clicking Help and then click Edit company Information.

Domain administrator account name

This is the user account name of the domain administrator of the source server. The account must be a member of the Domain Admins, Enterprise Admins, and Schema Admins groups. Note the default security group for the account cannot be one of these three groups. By default the Primary Group is Domain Users

Password

Password of the source server's administrator account name that was previously provided.

Source Server name

Name of the source server, the one you are migrating from.

Source domain name

This is the full DNS name of the business' internal domain. For example, example.local.

Source Server IP address

The IP address currently assigned to the Source server.

Default Gateway

The IP address of the router on the network.

The DHCP Server service is running on the Source Server

Tick this box if the DHCP Server service is running on the Source server. It is recommended that the DHCP server service runs on the destination server. If the DHCP Server service is running on the source server, the service will be moved automatically to the destination server. All other devices running DHCP Server service must be manually disabled.

Destination Server name

Name of the destination server, the one you are migration to. You are installing SBS 2011 on this server. Note the source and destination server names must be different.

Destination Server IP address

The IP address currently assigned to the destination server.

To run the Answer File Tool to create the migration answer file, complete the following steps:

  1. 1. On a computer or a server, insert the Windows SBS 2011 Standard DVD1, and at the first screen choose Create an answer file. This will run the Answer File Tool.

  2. 2. Click Migration from existing server (Join existing domain).

  3. 3. Enter the information you have collected for the answer file.

  4. 4. Save the answer file as sbsanswerfile.xml to the root of a removable media device.

 

Installing and migrating to Windows SBS 2011 Standard


Now that you have prepared both the source and destination server as well as having created an appropriate answer file, you are ready to begin the migration.

Migrating to Windows SBS 2011 Standard

With the Answer File now created we are ready to commence the migration process. This process will differ slightly, depending on the operating system of the source server. The most typical migration will be from existing Windows SBS 2003 and Windows SBS 2008 systems.

Migration Wizard tasks

The Migration Wizard is the tool that will guide you through the migration process. Some of the tasks will be automated; however, you will have to manually complete the remaining tasks. For the manual tasks, you are provided a link to the step-by-step instructions.

To run the Migration wizard, complete the following steps:

  1. 1. Open the Windows SBS 2011 Standard Console, and in Getting Started Tasks, click Migrate to Windows SBS.

  2. 2. Click Next, after you have read the welcome page information about the migration wizard.

  3. 3. Click Next again to start migrating data and settings from the source server to the destination server. The migration wizard home page appears.

  4. 4. Click Next to begin the first migration task. The following is a list of the procedures that are required to complete the migration:

    • Change the data storage location on the destination server.

    • Configure the Network.

    • Configure the Internet address.

    • Move Network settings.

    • Move Certificates (SBS2003).

    • Migrate Exchange Mailboxes.

    • Remove legacy Active Directory Group Policy objects and logon settings for SBS 2011 migration (SBS 2003).

    • Migrate users' shared data.

    • Migrate the internal website for Windows SBS 2011 Standard migration.

    • Move fax data for Windows SBS 2011 Standard migration.

    • Move user Accounts and groups from Windows SBS 2011 Standard migration (SBS 2003).

    • Enable folder redirection on the Destination Server for Windows SBS 2011 Standard migration.

    • Move Terminal Services Licensing for Windows SBS 2011 Standard migration.

    • Move SQL Server data.

    • Finish Windows SBS 2011 Standard migration.

The migration wizard is now complete. The Windows SBS 2011 Standard is now the Domain Controller for your network and all applications and data have been transferred. All that is remaining is for you to transfer your line of business software, uninstall Exchange Server from the source server, and the decommissioning of the source server if it is a Windows SBS server from the network. If your source server is Windows Server 2003 or 2008 decommissioning is not required, however you have the option to do so.

DNS clean-up

Once you have decommissioned the source server, the DNS server on the destination server still contains entries that point to the source server. It is a good idea to delete these DNS entries.

To delete DNS entries for the source server, from the destination server, complete the following:

  1. 1. Click Start | Administration Tools | DNS.

  2. 2. Click Continue in the User Account Control dialog if prompted.

  3. 3. Once the DNS Manager opens, expand server name, and then expand Forward Lookup Zones.

  4. 4. Right click the first zone, click Properties, and then click the Name Servers tab.

  5. 5. Click the entry in the Name Servers textbox that points to the source server, click Remove, and then click OK.

  6. 6. If more entries point at the source server, repeat step 5 until they are all removed.

  7. 7. Close the Properties window by clicking OK.

  8. 8. Still in the DNS Manager, expand Reverse Lookup Zones.

  9. 9. Repeat what you have done in steps 4 to 7, removing all of the Reverse Lookup Zones that point to the source server.

All references for the source server have now been removed from your network's DNS.

Domain clean-up

For the domain clean-up, make sure that there is only one DC, and that the SYSVOL and NETLOGON shares are present. Also check for File Replication Services event log to see if it is journal wrapping.

Configuring an Internet domain

Configuring an Internet domain is a required task to complete the migration process. To configure an Internet address, complete the following steps:

  1. 1. On the Migration Wizard Home page, in the migration wizard, click Next.

  2. 2. Click Configure the internet address, and then click Next.

  3. 3. On the Configure Internet Address page, click Start the Internet Address Management Wizard.

  4. 4. Complete the Internet Address Management Wizard.

  5. 5. Once the wizard is finished, click Task Complete on the Configure the Internet Address page, and then click Next. This returns you to the Migration Wizard Home page, and the task is marked Completed.

Configuring DNS name resolution (internal and external)

Configuring the DNS name resolution is a required task to complete the migration process. To configure the network, complete the following:

  1. 1. On the Migration Wizard Home page, in the migration wizard, click Next.

  2. 2. Click Start the Connect to the Internet Wizard.

  3. 3. Once the wizard is finished, it returns to the Migration Wizard Home page, and the task is marked Completed.

 

Configuring the network infrastructure


Once the server has completed the installation, you should check that it has connectivity to the Internet. You can do this by simply opening the browser on the server and navigating to a website. Given that the server has yet to fully patch and may potentially be without security software installed, it is recommended that you only navigate to a known and trusted site.

Once Internet connectivity to the server has been established, you need to ensure that the appropriate ports are forwarded from the router to the server's IP address.

Ports, protocols

As some routers do not support UPnP framework, or if you have chosen to disable UPnP on the router, you may have to manually configure your router to port forward the following ports directly to the IP of the destination server.

  • Port 25: SMTP—Email

  • Port 443: HTTPS SSL—RWA, OWA, Outlook Mobile Access

  • Port 987: HTTPS SSL—SharePoint Foundation 2010 via RWA

Additional Ports:

  • Port 1723 PPTP VPN—VPN connections

  • Port 80 HTTP—website. Note by default port 80 is redirected to port 443.

  • Port 3389 RDP—terminal services client

 

Test your knowledge


  1. 1. You have been asked to migrate to Windows SBS 2011 Standard from SBS 2003 Premium R2. What is the first thing that you should do on the SBS 2003 machine?

    • a. Run the SBS Best Practices Analyzer.

    • b. Uninstall ISA 2004.

    • c. Backup the server.

    • d. Remove the second network card.

  2. 2. You have been asked to use virtualization when configuring the new Windows SBS 2011 server. Can you:

    • a. Add the Hyper-V role to Windows SBS 2011 Standard after the initial installation.

    • b. Install Windows Server 2008 R2 as a host onto which you can install Windows SBS 2011 Standard as a guest.

    • c. Install Windows Server 2008 R2 as a member server to the Windows SBS 2011 Standard domain and use that as a host for virtualization.

    • d. Install VMware on Windows SBS 2011 Standard after the initial installation.

  3. 3. What is the minimum amount of RAM required to install Windows SBS 2011 Standard?

    • a. 4 GB.

    • b. 6 GB.

    • c. 8 GB.

    • d. 12 GB.

  4. 4. What is the maximum number of clients that Windows SBS 2011 Standard can support?

    • a. 25.

    • b. 50.

    • c. 75.

    • d. 100.

  5. 5. You are migrating from Windows SBS 2008 to Windows SBS 2011Standard, how many days do you have to decommission the Windows SBS 2008 from the network once you start the migration?

    • a. 7.

    • b. 14.

    • c. 21.

    • d. 30.

 

Summary


This chapter has taken you through the process of installing a Windows SBS 2011 Standard server from preparation, to installing the software, and post configuration tasks. You should now have a fully operational Windows SBS 2011 Standard server.

There is still a lot of work that needs to be completed before the network is fully ready for production, including the installation of third-party software; however, you should now be confident that the Windows SBS 2011 Standard server is ready to use. The secret to a successful installation is always planning and preparation. The Windows SBS 2011 Standard migration wizard now also greatly simplifies the migration of most existing networks to Windows SBS 2011 Standard. In general, it is recommended that you have completed both a fresh installation and a migration prior to taking the certification exam.

In the next chapter, we will look at how to configure Remote Access.

About the Authors

  • Drew Hills (MCITP MCSE DCNE SBSC BEngTech (Elec) )

    Drew is a Microsoft Certified IT Professional (Enterprise Administrator), Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer, and a Microsoft Small Business Specialist 2003, 2008 and 2011. He is also a D-Link Certified Network Engineer, and holds a Bachelor of Engineering Technology (Electrical and Electronic Engineering). Drew has passed 18 different Microsoft Certification exams thus far, and he aims to continue to use Microsoft Certification Exams as a means of staying current in the IT industry. Drew is a past owner of a successful ICT company which ran for seven years, before selling his company. He has since been working as an Operations Manager or as a Senior Systems Engineer for a number of Managed Services based support companies, whilst enjoying a greater work life balance. Drew describes himself as a quiet achiever, however, he is an active and regular contributor to the SMB IT Professional community in Australia. In the 13 plus years Drew has worked in IT, his primary focus has always been on the SMB client base, with the majority being based on the Microsoft SBS product range. Drew divides his passion equally between the SMB client base and the Microsoft technologies that support these clients.

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  • Robert Crane (BE MBA MCP)

    Robert has a degree in Electrical Engineering as well as Masters of Business Administration. He is also a Small Business Specialist and Microsoft Certified SharePoint Professional. In 2012 he was awarded Microsoft’s Most Valuable Professional (MVP) award for his contributions to the Office 365 product. Robert has over 15 years of IT experience in a variety of fields and positions, including working on Wall St in New York. He was the founder and Principal of the Computer Information Agency. Apart from resolving client technical issues, Robert continues to present at seminars locally and internationally, as well as write on a number of topics for the Computer Information Agency. He also develops and presents technology courses on a regular basis on topics including SharePoint and Office 365. Robert is committed to a process of on-going business and technical education to continue developing the skills required to assist clients with their business challenges.

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