Search icon
Subscription
0
Cart icon
Close icon
You have no products in your basket yet
Save more on your purchases!
Savings automatically calculated. No voucher code required
Arrow left icon
All Products
Best Sellers
New Releases
Books
Videos
Audiobooks
Learning Hub
Newsletters
Free Learning
Arrow right icon
Manage Partitions with GParted How-to
Manage Partitions with GParted How-to

Manage Partitions with GParted How-to: A task-based, step-by-step guide that empowers you to use your disk space effectively with this book and ebook.

By Curtis Gedak
$9.99 $6.98
Book Nov 2012 86 pages 1st Edition
eBook
$9.99 $6.98
Print
$21.99
Subscription
$15.99 Monthly
eBook
$9.99 $6.98
Print
$21.99
Subscription
$15.99 Monthly

What do you get with eBook?

Product feature icon Instant access to your Digital eBook purchase
Product feature icon Download this book in EPUB and PDF formats
Product feature icon Access this title in our online reader with advanced features
Product feature icon DRM FREE - Read whenever, wherever and however you want
Buy Now

Product Details


Publication date : Nov 23, 2012
Length 86 pages
Edition : 1st Edition
Language : English
ISBN-13 : 9781849519823
Table of content icon View table of contents Preview book icon Preview Book

Manage Partitions with GParted How-to

Chapter 1. Manage Partitions with GParted How-to

Welcome to Manage Partitions with Gparted where we will lead you on a path to knowledge and discovery that will empower you to take control of your disk storage partitions.

Your first question might be—Why would this be of interest to me?

That is a good question.

  • Have you ever run out of storage space on your C: drive, while having plenty of free space in your D: drive?

  • Perhaps you have an interest in installing a new operating system, or upgrading your current one?

  • Or, maybe you wondered if there is a way to make computer maintenance tasks quicker, or data backup more manageable?

This book will help you meet these challenges by providing the steps and knowledge needed to successfully manage your disk device partitions.

Manage Partitions with GParted How-to


In the beginning...

In the early days of computing and disk storage devices, file system and partition tools were very basic. You could create a partition, format the partition with a file system, and read and write data to the file system. For a long time, these basic tools were all that was available.

As disk storage grew, a need arose to be able to add and change partitions to better utilize the extra storage space. However, resizing a partition and file system was not possible.

Fortunately a number of people who believed in Free Software took it upon themselves to address these shortcomings. Some researched and developed tools to permit editing partitions. Others focused on tools to resize file systems without losing the contents. These tools were then published as Free Software with Open Source licenses, enabling all of us to use and share this software with our friends, family, and co-workers.

Many of these partition and file system tools are available only as text-based commands. To reach a wider audience, the GParted team saw a need for making these tools easier to use. This resulted in the creation of GParted, which provides a graphical interface to these partition libraries and file system tools.

GParted software

In the recipes that follow, we will be using the GParted application from live media containing the GParted Live image.

GParted Live is a small bootable GNU/Linux distribution for x86- and x86_64-based computers that enables you to use all the features of the GParted application on Windows, GNU/Linux, and Intel-based Mac OS X computers.

Importance of computer system backups

Editing partitions has the potential to cause loss of data; there is always the possibility that something could go wrong due to software bugs, hardware failure, or power outage.

As such you are strongly advised to backup your computer system. Backup, test your backups, and backup again. Believe me, there might come a time when you will be glad you did this.

There are many different ways to backup your computer system. Some people make a complete image backup of their storage devices. Others such as myself backup the data only, with the realization that if something goes horribly wrong then I will need to re-install the operating system and applications from original media, in addition to restoring my valuable data. How you backup your computer information is up to you. The important thing is to make good backups.

Some partition editing actions inherently carry a higher risk for loss of data. In the recipes that follow we will indicate which actions have the highest risk.

Disclaimer

This book is distributed in the hope that it will be useful, but without any warranty; without even the implied warranty of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose.

And now with the necessities out of the way, let us get on with learning how to manage our partitions.

Creating live media and running GParted (Must know)


We will need a copy of the GParted software for all of the recipes that follow. As such, we will start by downloading GParted Live, burning the image to a CD, and then booting from the CD.

Getting ready

You will need a blank CD-R or CD-R/W disc, a CD burner, and CD writing software.

How to do it...

Follow these steps to create a Live CD:

  1. Download the disk image file gparted-live-w.x.y-z.iso for the latest stable release of GParted Live from the GParted website, http://gparted.org/download.php.

  2. Optionally, verify the integrity of the downloaded file by running a program to determine the MD5SUM of the .iso file and ensuring that this value matches the MD5SUM checksum listed on the above mentioned web page.

  3. Insert a blank CD and use the CD writing software to "burn" the .iso file to the blank CD as an image. The .iso file must be burned as an image. If the .iso file is written as data then the CD will not boot up a computer.

Now, boot your computer using the Live CD:

  1. Reboot your computer with GParted Live CD in the CD tray of your computer.

  2. Press the Enter key when the GParted Live boot screen is displayed:

  3. Press the Enter key to use the standard US keymap:

  4. Press the Enter key to use the US English language:

  5. Press the Enter key to start up the default graphical environment:

  6. You are now ready to begin using GParted.

How it works...

The best way to use GParted is from Live media, such as GParted Live burned to a CD or written to a USB flash drive. When your computer is booted from the hard drive, the operating system has access to the partitions. To prevent this access and hence enable all supported partition editing actions, boot your computer using GParted Live removable media.

By downloading and using the latest stable release of GParted Live, you will have access to all the latest features and bug fixes.

There's more...

In this example we used all of the default settings for GParted Live. However, several other options are available. For example if you choose the mode to load GParted Live to RAM then you will have access to your CD tray, which can be useful for making data backups to CD. Other options allow you to choose a different keyboard layout or select a different language.

Missing MD5SUM

If the MD5SUM program is not available on your computer, you can locate this software on the Internet with search criteria such as md5sum download.

Missing CD writer software

If you do not have CD writing software, you can locate this type of software on the Internet with search criteria such as cd burning software.

Additional help

The GParted website contains additional resources to help you. See http://gparted.org/help.php.

For example, you can learn how to install GParted Live on a USB flash drive, on a hard drive, or on a PXE server.

Identifying proper disk device (Must know)


Before performing any partition editing, it is important to select the correct disk device. To do this we look at details, such as size, model, manufacturer, and device name. These details contain valuable information that will guide selection of the correct device.

How to do it...

  1. Size is the first indicator of which device to choose. To select a device, go to the GParted | Devices menu option and select a device of the correct size.

  2. If there is more than one device of the same size, additional information is needed. To view more device information, select the View | Device Information menu option, which will toggle the display of the device information pane, as shown in the following screenshot:

  3. Examine the device details, such as model, partition table, and sector size, to see if this is the device to modify.

  4. If there are two or more identical disk drives from the same manufacturer, then look at the partition layout.

  5. Examine the partitions in the graphical display area, and also in the text list of details to see if this is the correct device.

  6. If there are two identical disks with the same partition layout, then this might be a RAID configuration. In this situation examine the device name as well. RAID arrays, which are configured using the motherboard BIOS, will have device names that start with /dev/mapper/.... With RAID configurations choose the RAID device name. Please note that the /dev/mapper directory might also contain Logical Volume Management (LVM) or encrypted (dm-crypt) entries.

    If the correct device has not yet been chosen, then go back to step 1 and start over by selecting a different device.

How it works...

Often, size alone can distinguish among different disk devices. Disk sizes can be a little tricky though because disk manufacturers use SI decimal prefixes (for example, 1 MB = 1,000,000 bytes), whereas GParted uses IEC binary prefixes (for example, 1 MiB = 1,048,576 bytes). The difference between these two methods becomes quite noticeable as the disk size becomes larger. For example, 160 GB is about 149 GiB. Hence the size of the disk device as shown in GParted will always be a lower number than the one reported by the disk manufacturer.

The device name is also useful to help distinguish among different disk devices. Device names vary by disk device as shown in the following table:

Disk device types

Sample device names

Hard disk drives (IDE, SATA, SCSI), USB flash drives, and dedicated hardware RAID drives

/dev/sda

/dev/sdb

/dev/sdc

Memory Cards (SD, SDHC, MMC)

/dev/mmcblk0

/dev/mmcblk1

Motherboard BIOS (ATA) RAID drives

/dev/mapper/isw_...

/dev/mapper/nvidia_...

/dev/mapper/jmicron_...

Linux Software RAID drives

/dev/md0

/dev/md1

Note

Historically IDE drives in Linux had device names such as /dev/hda and /dev/hdb. With Linux kernels >= 2.6.20 the device names became the same as for SATA, SCSI, and USB (for example, /dev/sda).

There's more...

There is another handy way to select a disk device. You can select a disk device from the drop-down menu in the upper-left hand corner of the window.

Device containing data shown as unallocated

If you know the disk device contains data, but GParted shows the entire device as unallocated then there is no need to panic. It is possible there is a problem with the partition table.

Check for partition table problems by double-clicking on the unallocated disk device. This will bring up an information window, as shown in the following screenshot, which displays possible warnings about the device:

Two examples of warning messages that indicate partition table problems are as follows. A valid partition table:

  • Can't have overlapping partitions

  • Can't have a partition outside the disk

Resolution of these problems usually requires manually editing the partition table. The GParted website FAQ contains instructions on how to approach fixing these problems. See http://gparted.org/faq.php.

You can also seek help in the GParted forum. See http://gparted.org/forum.php.

Identifying partitions and actions available (Must know)


With the proper disk device selected, it is important to choose the correct partition. In the following steps we will discover how to identify partitions and the actions available.

Getting ready

Before picking a partition, it helps to know some background information about the primary types of file systems for each operating system. A brief summary of default file systems for operating systems is as follows:

Default File System

Operating System

EXT2/3/4

Linux

FAT16

Windows 95/NT/3.x, DOS

FAT32

Windows XP/ME/98

HFS+

Mac OS X

JFS

IBM AIX

NTFS

Windows 7/Vista/XP/2000/NT, Windows Server 2008/2003

UFS

BSD, SunOS/Solaris, HP-UX

XFS

SGI IRIX

Note that many operating systems support more than just the above listed default file systems. For example FAT16 and FAT32 are supported by many operating systems. As such, FAT16 and FAT32 are useful for sharing information between operating systems.

Typically drive letters in Windows and DOS correspond to partitions, except when the file system is not recognized by these operating systems.

With Windows and DOS, C: is often the first, and perhaps the only, partition on the disk device. Normally this partition is used in the boot process and has the boot flag set, as shown in the following screenshot. Note that only one partition on a disk device can have the boot flag set.

Many other partition layouts are possible. For example, some disk devices contain an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) rescue partition at the start of the drive and hence the main operating system resides in a later partition.

How to do it...

  1. Select the partition you wish to modify.

  2. If the partition has a padlock icon, or key icon beside the partition entry, then the partition is in use. To be able to modify the partition, select the menu option, Partition | Unmount, to unmount the file system.

  3. Note that Linux swap and lvm2 physical volumes will display a different menu name. Specifically:

    • For linux-swap, the menu option is:

      Partition | Swapoff

    • For lvm2 pv, the menu option is:

      Partition | Deactivate

  4. If you wish to view the actions available for file systems, select the menu option, View | File System Support, which will open a window with details for the actions supported.

How it works...

When a partition is selected, the partition editing actions that are not available will be grayed out in the menus, and the corresponding buttons in the taskbar will be disabled.

Many partition editing actions require that the file system is not in use. Hence to be able to perform the widest range of editing actions, the file system must not be mounted, enabled as swap space, or in use in any other way.

There's more...

Operating systems, such as Linux, can use many different types of file systems and do not require the boot flag to be set to boot the computer.

Labeling the partitions

To make it easier to identify partitions in the future, you can set a label on the file system in the partition. The steps to set a label on a partition will be covered later under the Formatting a partition recipe.

Checking and repairing a partition (Should know)


Sometimes problems arise with the file systems in partitions. In the following section you will learn how to identify and address problems with file systems.

How to do it...

You can identify possible file system problems by following these steps:

  1. GParted indicates possible file system problems by placing an exclamation mark triangle icon beside the partition entry. If GParted displays the exclamation mark triangle icon, as shown in the following screenshot, select the partition:

  2. Choose the Partition | Information menu option.

  3. View the problem in the Warning section at the bottom of the window.

  4. Click on Close to close the Information window.

You can attempt repair of file system problems by following these steps:

  1. Choose the Partition | Check menu option to queue the check operation. The queued check operation is shown in the operations pane at the bottom of the window. The operations pane appears when at least one operation is queued.

  2. Choose the Edit | Apply All Operations menu option to apply the queued operations to disk.

  3. Click on Apply to apply operations to disk.

  4. Click on Close to close the apply operations to disk window.

How it works...

When GParted reads information from the device partitions and file systems, it makes notes of any problems encountered. The presence of these problems is indicated by an exclamation mark triangle icon beside the partition entry.

Examples of problems that occur are as follows:

  • The file system contains inconsistencies and requires repair

  • The file system is smaller than the containing partition and could be grown to use space more effectively

  • Some required software is missing from the Linux installation so GParted is unable to determine space usage in a file system

Note that the GParted Live image contains all of the required software

There's more...

While GParted operations are in the process of being applied, you can click on Details to open a details pane. Inside this pane you can click on each of the hierarchy of operations to expand and view more detailed information.

Checking and fixing NTFS file systems

An NTFS file system can become inconsistent if Windows is not cleanly shut down, for example, if the computer was powered off while it was running. To repair the NTFS file system, the preferred practice is to boot into Windows, open a command prompt (press Windows logo + R and enter cmd.exe) and use the check disk program by entering the following command:

chkdsk /f /r

Where the parameters indicate the following:

  • /f: Fixes errors on the disk. The disk must be locked.

  • /r: Locates bad sectors and recovers readable information. The disk must be locked.

Note that if chkdsk cannot lock the drive, a message appears that asks you if you want to check the drive the next time you restart the computer. Answer y to this question, as shown in the following screenshot:

After entering the chkdsk command, go through two reboot cycles to ensure that Windows has completely repaired the file system. A screen similar to the following is shown while chkdsk is running:

Getting space by shrinking a partition (Should know)


When a partition contains extra space it can be beneficial to free up this space for use in other partitions. This section demonstrates how to get space by shrinking a partition.

Note that the resize and move functionality is a core building block of re-organizing partitions. As shrinking, moving, and growing partitions involve different considerations and levels of risk, these three actions have been separated into their own individual tasks.

Getting ready

Before before performing this task, we highly recommend that you backup your data. This recipe involves moving the end of a partition boundary which is a moderate risk activity.

When you shrink a partition, the freed up space will be available immediately to the right of the partition. If this freed up space is required in a different location on the disk, you might need to consider moving other partitions, or resizing the start or end of the extended partition. Moving or growing partitions is covered in later tasks.

Remember that to perform operations on a partition, the partition must not be mounted or otherwise active. For operations on the extended partition, none of the logical partitions can be mounted or otherwise active. You can use the Partition menu to unmount, swapoff, or deactivate partitions as needed.

How to do it...

  1. Select a partition containing unused space.

  2. Choose the menu option Partition | Resize/Move and a Resize/Move window is displayed.

  3. Click on the right-hand side of the partition and drag the right-hand side to the left.

    Tip

    Leave at least 10 percent or more unused space in the partition because many file systems require some unused space to be able to function properly.

  4. Click on Resize/Move to queue the shrink operation. The queued shrink operation is shown in the operations pane.

  5. Choose the menu option Edit | Apply All Operations to apply the queued operations to disk.

  6. Click on Apply to apply operations to disk.

  7. Click on Close to close the apply operations to disk window.

How it works...

In the above steps, we moved the right-hand side of the partition, also known as the end of the partition. This instructs GParted to resize (shrink) the partition.

In this example, we left many options at the default values. If you wish to maintain compatibility with old operating systems, such as DOS, then you should set the Align to drop down list to the Cylinder setting. To ensure optimum space usage it is best to use the same alignment setting for all partitions on a disk device, normally MiB alignment with modern operating systems.

If you require more precise partition sizing, you can enter values or use the arrows in the New size, or Free space following spin boxes.

There's more...

If you resize a partition containing an NTFS file system, you should reboot into Windows twice. This permits Windows to perform file system consistency checks.

Moving the left-hand side of a partition

If the left-hand side of the partition, also known as the beginning of the partition, is moved, the operation is no longer simply a partition resize. Two steps are required due to the metadata contained at the beginning of the file system. One operation is needed to shrink the partition, and another to move the partition.

Moving the start of a partition involves extra considerations that will be discussed later in the Moving a partition recipe.

Creating a new partition (Should know)


In this recipe we will cover the steps to create a new partition for storing data. We also discuss options for creating different types of partitions.

How to do it...

  1. Select unallocated space on a disk device.

  2. Choose the Partition | New menu option and a new partition window is displayed.

  3. Optionally, you can set the partition New size to a smaller value.

    Tip

    To adjust the partition size click on one of the side arrows on the partition graphic (shown in the following screenshot) and drag it to left or right. Alternatively enter a new value for New Size or click on the up and down spin button arrows beside the number.

    To move the entire partition click on the partition and drag it to left or right.

  4. Select a File system for the partition; for example, fat32. A list of default file systems used by operating systems can be found in the Identifying partitions and actions available recipe.

  5. Enter a Label for the file system; for example, MYDATA.

  6. Click on Add.

  7. Choose the Edit | Apply All Operations menu option to apply the queued operations to disk.

  8. Click on Apply to apply operations to disk.

  9. Click on Close to close the apply operations to disk window:

How it works...

The above steps instruct GParted to create a partition using all of the unallocated space. Further, the partition is formatted with a file system with the label specified (for example, MYDATA).

We left many options at the default values. Some other things to consider are:

  • Creating the partition as a different type. For example, with an MSDOS partition table you might try using Create as an Extended Partition, or Create as a Logical Partition. Read on to learn why you might want to use different partition types.

  • Setting the Align to drop-down list to Cylinder setting if you wish to maintain compatibility with older operating systems, such as DOS.

There's more...

One of the most common partition tables in use is the MSDOS partition table. This partition table has a limitation of four partition slots. The four slots can consist of up to four primary partitions, or up to three primary partitions and one extended partition. The extended partition is a special type of partition that can contain multiple logical partitions. If you wish to have more than four partitions in an MSDOS partition table, you need to create one extended partition. Inside the extended partition you can create more than one logical partition.

The choice of partition type is important because after a partition has been created, the partition type cannot be easily changed. For example, a primary partition cannot be easily turned into a logical partition, or vice versa. To change the partition type the partition must be deleted.

The three partition types use device numbers in the device name as follows:

  • Primary partitions use device numbers 1 through 4 (for example, /dev/sda3).

  • An extended partition uses one of the device numbers from 1 through 4.

  • Logical partitions use device numbers 5 and higher (for example, /dev/sda12).

Note that only one extended partition is permitted in an MSDOS partition table.

The following diagram depicts a primary partition (sda1), followed by an extended partition (sda2), which contains three logical partitions (sda5, sda6, and sda7).

The extended and logical partitions in this example were set up by first creating the extended partition sda2. Then, within the extended partition we created the logical partitions sda5, sda6, and sda7.

Managing partition flags

Most computer users will not need to be concerned about setting partition flags. However, for users configuring more complex storage scenarios, such as RAID or Logical Volume Management (LVM), the following steps demonstrate how to toggle partition flags to be set or unset.

  1. Select an existing partition; for example, a partition that has already been created.

  2. Choose the Partition | Manage Flags menu option and a Manage flags window will be displayed.

  3. As shown in the following screenshot, select the checkbox to toggle the flag between set and unset (for example, lvm)

  4. Click on Close and the flag will be set or unset as you indicated.

Moving a partition (Become an expert)


Moving a partition is a complex and long running operation. As there are implications to moving a partition, we will discuss these along with the steps to move a partition.

Getting ready

Before performing this task, we highly recommend that you backup your data. This task involves moving the start of a partition boundary, which is a high-risk activity.

One implication of moving a system partition is possibly breaking the boot process. The boot process can be repaired, so before moving a partition you should be prepared to repair the boot configuration. Specifically, you will need your operating system install media, and to be ready to check the GParted website for details on how to repair the boot process.

How to do it...

  1. Select a partition to move.

  2. Choose the Partition | Resize/Move menu option and a Resize/Move window will be displayed:

  3. Click in the middle of the partition and drag the partition in the direction you want to move. (for example, to the right). Note that if grow and/or shrink are supported for the file system then you can also change the size of the partition.

  4. Click on Resize/Move to queue the move operation.

  5. Click on OK to acknowledge the warning.

  6. Choose the menu option Edit | Apply All Operations to apply the queued operations to disk.

  7. Click on Apply to apply operations to disk.

  8. Click on Close to close the apply operations to disk window.

How it works...

Before moving a partition, GParted reads all sectors to check for bad sectors. After a successful read of all sectors, GParted will begin copying sectors to their new location. This process can take a very long time since many sector read and write actions are required.

The move process is different for an extended partition. Since an extended partition is a container for logical partitions, it does not have its own file system. As such, moving an extended partition involves moving the partition boundaries only.

Moving can be combined with resizing a partition. Since the move operation is distinct from the resize operation, GParted will optimally determine the order of the resize and move steps to minimize the amount of data to be moved.

In this example, we left many options at the default values. If you wish to maintain compatibility with old operating systems, such as DOS, then you should set the Align to drop down list to the Cylinder setting.

If you require more precise partition movement, you can type in values or use the arrows in the Free space preceding, New size, or Free space following spin boxes.

There's more...

If you resize a partition containing an NTFS file system, you should reboot into Windows twice. This permits Windows to perform file system consistency checks.

Booting problems after moving

The configuration for boot loaders often includes data on specific disk locations in order to boot an operating system. If a partition is involved in the boot process, and the partition is moved then this can break the boot process. When the boot process is broken, the boot configuration must be repaired. A brief summary of repair commands is in the next section.

Windows 7/Vista repair commands

The following commands are entered at the command line when using the Recovery Console from the Windows Vista or Windows 7 installation disk.

  • To repair the Master Boot Record of the boot disk:

    bootrec /fixmbr
    
  • To write a new partition boot sector to the system partition:

    bootrec /fixboot
    
  • To rebuild the Boot Configuration Data (BCD) store:

    bootrec /rebuildbcd
    
Windows XP repair commands

The following commands are entered at the command line when using the Recovery Console from the Windows XP installation disk.

  • To repair the Master Boot Record of the boot disk:

    fixmbr
    
  • To write a new partition boot sector to the system partition:

    fixboot
    
  • To rebuild the boot.ini configuration file:

    bootcfg /rebuild
    

For more information about repairing the boot process for some common boot loaders, refer to the GParted website frequently asked questions page. See http://gparted.org/faq.php.

Adding space by growing a partition (Should know)


When a partition is running out of free space it can be useful to add more space to the partition. Adding space is possible if unallocated space is available, or can be made available, immediately adjacent to the partition. In this recipe we cover the steps to add space to a partition.

Getting ready

Before performing this task, we highly recommend that you backup your data. This task involves moving the end of a partition boundary which is a moderate risk activity.

Note that in order to perform actions on a partition, the partition must be unmounted. In the case of an extended partition, all of the logical partitions must be unmounted or otherwise inactive.

If there is no unallocated space immediately adjacent to the partition you wish to grow, then you might need to shrink, move, or delete other partitions to free up adjacent unallocated space.

The location of the unallocated space is important. To add space to a primary partition the unallocated space must be outside of the extended partition. To add space to a logical partition the unallocated space must be within the extended partition. Hence you might need to resize the extended partition, placing the unallocated space outside or inside the extended partition.

How to do it...

  1. Select the partition to add space to.

  2. Choose the Partition | Resize/Move menu option and a Resize/Move window is displayed:

  3. Click on the right-hand side of the partition and drag it to the right.

  4. Click on Resize/Move to queue the grow operation. The queued grow operation is shown in the operations pane.

  5. Choose the Edit | Apply All Operations menu option to apply the queued operations to disk.

  6. Click on Apply to apply operations to disk.

  7. Click on Close to close the apply operations to disk window.

How it works...

In the above steps, we expanded the right-hand side of the partition, also known as the end of the partition. This instructs GParted to resize (grow) the partition.

In this example, we left many options at the default values. If you wish to maintain compatibility with old operating systems, such as DOS, you should set the Align to drop down list to the Cylinder setting. If you require more precise partition sizing, you can enter values or use the arrows in the for New size, or Free space following spin boxes.

There's more...

If you resize a partition containing an NTFS file system, you should reboot into Windows twice. This permits Windows to perform file system consistency checks.

Moving the left-hand side of a partition

If the left-hand side of the partition, also known as the beginning of the partition, is moved then the operation is no longer simply a partition resize. Two steps are required due to the metadata contained at the beginning of the file system. One operation is needed to move the partition, and another to grow the partition.

Moving the start of a partition involves extra considerations that are discussed earlier in the Moving a partition recipe.

Left arrow icon Right arrow icon

Key benefits

  • Learn something new in an Instant! A short, fast, focused guide delivering immediate results.
  • Full of practical examples including screen shots, additional tips, and clear step-by-step instructions
  • Create and move partitions without data loss
  • Identify and manage partitions on all of your disk devices

Description

Modern disk drives can store vast amounts of information. To effectively use all of this space, you can partition disk drives into separate storage areas. These separate storage areas enable you to organize your data, improve system performance, and install and use many operating systems"Manage Partitions with GParted" is a practical, hands-on guide providing you with step-by-step instructions to effectively organize your hard drive. You start with simple tasks that help you identify drives and partitions and progress to advanced tasks such as preparing for new operating systemsThis book provides ample screen shots to help you effectively use your hard drive. You start with simple tasks that help you to identify drives and partitions. Next you progress to tasks covering the basics of how to grow, shrink, move, and copy partitions without data loss. You finish with advanced tasks that use the basics to prepare for new operating systems, migrate space between partitions, and share data among Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X. By following through the tasks, from basic to advanced, this book will empower you with the knowledge and tools to Manage Partitions with GParted.

What you will learn

Learn the basics of partition management, such as how to grow, shrink, move, and copy partitions without data loss Prepare new disk devices for use on your computer Free up space for new operating systems Create live media and run GParted Prepare for dual booting with GNU/Linux Rescue data from lost partitions Learn tips to edit iPod partitions, and to add space to virtual machines

What do you get with eBook?

Product feature icon Instant access to your Digital eBook purchase
Product feature icon Download this book in EPUB and PDF formats
Product feature icon Access this title in our online reader with advanced features
Product feature icon DRM FREE - Read whenever, wherever and however you want
Buy Now

Product Details


Publication date : Nov 23, 2012
Length 86 pages
Edition : 1st Edition
Language : English
ISBN-13 : 9781849519823

Table of Contents

7 Chapters
Manage Partitions with GParted How-to Chevron down icon Chevron up icon
Credits Chevron down icon Chevron up icon
About the Author Chevron down icon Chevron up icon
About the Reviewers Chevron down icon Chevron up icon
www.PacktPub.com Chevron down icon Chevron up icon
Preface Chevron down icon Chevron up icon
1. Manage Partitions with GParted How-to Chevron down icon Chevron up icon

Customer reviews

Filter icon Filter
Top Reviews
Rating distribution
Empty star icon Empty star icon Empty star icon Empty star icon Empty star icon 0
(0 Ratings)
5 star 0%
4 star 0%
3 star 0%
2 star 0%
1 star 0%

Filter reviews by


No reviews found
Get free access to Packt library with over 7500+ books and video courses for 7 days!
Start Free Trial

FAQs

How do I buy and download an eBook? Chevron down icon Chevron up icon

Where there is an eBook version of a title available, you can buy it from the book details for that title. Add either the standalone eBook or the eBook and print book bundle to your shopping cart. Your eBook will show in your cart as a product on its own. After completing checkout and payment in the normal way, you will receive your receipt on the screen containing a link to a personalised PDF download file. This link will remain active for 30 days. You can download backup copies of the file by logging in to your account at any time.

If you already have Adobe reader installed, then clicking on the link will download and open the PDF file directly. If you don't, then save the PDF file on your machine and download the Reader to view it.

Please Note: Packt eBooks are non-returnable and non-refundable.

Packt eBook and Licensing When you buy an eBook from Packt Publishing, completing your purchase means you accept the terms of our licence agreement. Please read the full text of the agreement. In it we have tried to balance the need for the ebook to be usable for you the reader with our needs to protect the rights of us as Publishers and of our authors. In summary, the agreement says:

  • You may make copies of your eBook for your own use onto any machine
  • You may not pass copies of the eBook on to anyone else
How can I make a purchase on your website? Chevron down icon Chevron up icon

If you want to purchase a video course, eBook or Bundle (Print+eBook) please follow below steps:

  1. Register on our website using your email address and the password.
  2. Search for the title by name or ISBN using the search option.
  3. Select the title you want to purchase.
  4. Choose the format you wish to purchase the title in; if you order the Print Book, you get a free eBook copy of the same title. 
  5. Proceed with the checkout process (payment to be made using Credit Card, Debit Cart, or PayPal)
Where can I access support around an eBook? Chevron down icon Chevron up icon
  • If you experience a problem with using or installing Adobe Reader, the contact Adobe directly.
  • To view the errata for the book, see www.packtpub.com/support and view the pages for the title you have.
  • To view your account details or to download a new copy of the book go to www.packtpub.com/account
  • To contact us directly if a problem is not resolved, use www.packtpub.com/contact-us
What eBook formats do Packt support? Chevron down icon Chevron up icon

Our eBooks are currently available in a variety of formats such as PDF and ePubs. In the future, this may well change with trends and development in technology, but please note that our PDFs are not Adobe eBook Reader format, which has greater restrictions on security.

You will need to use Adobe Reader v9 or later in order to read Packt's PDF eBooks.

What are the benefits of eBooks? Chevron down icon Chevron up icon
  • You can get the information you need immediately
  • You can easily take them with you on a laptop
  • You can download them an unlimited number of times
  • You can print them out
  • They are copy-paste enabled
  • They are searchable
  • There is no password protection
  • They are lower price than print
  • They save resources and space
What is an eBook? Chevron down icon Chevron up icon

Packt eBooks are a complete electronic version of the print edition, available in PDF and ePub formats. Every piece of content down to the page numbering is the same. Because we save the costs of printing and shipping the book to you, we are able to offer eBooks at a lower cost than print editions.

When you have purchased an eBook, simply login to your account and click on the link in Your Download Area. We recommend you saving the file to your hard drive before opening it.

For optimal viewing of our eBooks, we recommend you download and install the free Adobe Reader version 9.