Articles

Filter Your Search

Filter Your Search
Category
Web Development
Application Development
Hardware & Creative
Networking & Servers
Big Data & Business Intelligence
Game Development
Virtualization & Cloud
Business
Series
Learning
Essentials
Cookbook
Blueprints
Mastering
Level
Starting
Progressing
1   2   3   4   5  
View:   12   24   48  
Sort By:  
Using Basic Projectiles

"Flying is learning how to throw yourself at the ground and miss."                                                                                              – Douglas Adams In this article by Michael Haungs , author of the book  Creative Greenfoot , we will create a simple game using basic movements in Greenfoot. Actors in creative Greenfoot applications, such as games and animations, often have movement that can best be described as being launched . For example, a soccer ball, bullet, laser, light ray, baseball, and firework are examples of this type of object. One common method of implementing this type of movement is to create a set of classes that model real-world physical properties (mass, velocity, acceleration, friction, and so on) and have game or simulation actors inherit from these classes. Some refer to this as creating a physics engine for your game or simulation. However, this course of action is complex and often overkill. There are often simple heuristics we can use to approximate realistic motion. This is the approach we will take here. In this article, you will learn about the basics of projectiles, how to make an object bounce, and a little about particle effects. We will apply what you learn to a small platform game that we will build up over the course of this article. Creating realistic flying objects is not simple, but we will cover this topic in a methodical, step-by-step approach, and when we are done, you will be able to populate your creative scenarios with a wide variety of flying, jumping, and launched objects. It's not as simple as Douglas Adams makes it sound in his quote, but nothing worth learning ever is.

Writing Simple Behaviors

In this article by Richard Sneyd , the author of Stencyl Essentials , we will learn about Stencyl's signature visual programming interface to create logic and interaction in our game. We create this logic using a WYSIWYG ( What You See Is What You Get ) block snapping interface. By the end of this article, you will have the Player Character whizzing down the screen, in pursuit of a zigzagging air balloon! Some of the things we will learn to do in this article are as follows: Create Actor Behaviors , and attach them to Actor Types . Add Events to our Behaviors . Use If blocks to create branching, conditional logic to handle various states within our game. Accept and react to input from the player. Apply physical forces to Actors in real-time. One of the great things about this visual approach to programming is that it largely removes the unpleasantness of dealing with syntax (the rules of the programming language), and the inevitable errors that come with it, when we're creating logic for our game. That frees us to focus on the things that matter most in our games: smooth, well wrought game mechanics and enjoyable, well crafted game-play.

Apache Solr and Big Data – integration with MongoDB

In this article by Hrishikesh Vijay Karambelkar , author of the book Scaling Big Data with Hadoop and Solr - Second Edition , we will go through Apache Solr and MongoDB together. In an enterprise, data is generated from all the software that is participating in day-to-day operations. This data has different formats, and bringing in this data for big-data processing requires a storage system that is flexible enough to accommodate a data with varying data models. A NoSQL database, by its design, is best suited for this kind of storage requirements. One of the primary objectives of NoSQL is horizontal scaling, that is, the P in CAP theorem, but this works at the cost of sacrificing Consistency or Availability. Visit  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CAP_theorem to understand more about CAP theorem

Working with Data in Forms

In this article by Mindaugas Pocius , the author of Microsoft Dynamics AX 2012 R3 Development Cookbook , explains about data organization in the forms. We will cover the following recipes: Using a number sequence handler Creating a custom filter control Creating a custom instant search filter

Auto updating child records in Process Builder

In this article by Rakesh Gupta , the author of the book Learning Salesforce Visual Workflow , we will discuss how to auto update child records using Process Builder of Salesforce. There are several business use cases where a customer wants to update child records based on some criteria, for example, auto-updating all related Opportunity to Closed-Lost if an account is updated to Inactive . To achieve these types of business requirements, you can use the Apex trigger. You can also achieve these types of requirements using the following methods: Process Builder A combination of Flow and Process Builder A combination of Flow and Inline Visualforce page on the account detail page

Writing a Fully Native Application

In this article written by Sylvain Ratabouil , author of Android NDK Beginner`s Guide - Second Edition , we have breached Android NDK's surface using JNI. But there is much more to find inside! The NDK includes its own set of specific features, one of them being Native Activities . Native activities allow creating applications based only on native code, without a single line of Java. No more JNI! No more references! No more Java!

Installation and Upgrade

In this article by Robert Hedblom , author of the book  Microsoft System Center Data Protection Manager Cookbook , we will cover the installation and upgrade for SQL Server on DPM server. We will also understand the prerequisites to start your upgrade process. You will learn how to: Install a SQL Server locally on the DPM server Prepare a remote SQL Server for DPMDB

Symmetric Messages and Asynchronous Messages (Part 1)

In this article by Kingston Smiler. S , author of the book  OpenFlow Cookbook describes the steps involved in sending and processing symmetric messages and asynchronous messages in the switch and contains the following recipes: Sending and processing a hello message Sending and processing an echo request and a reply message Sending and processing an error message Sending and processing an experimenter message Handling a Get Asynchronous Configuration message from the controller, which is used to fetch a list of asynchronous events that will be sent from the switch Sending a Packet-In message to the controller Sending a Flow-removed message to the controller Sending a port-status message to the controller Sending a controller-role status message to the controller Sending a table-status message to the controller Sending a request-forward message to the controller Handling a packet-out message from the controller Handling a barrier-message from the controller

Ensuring Five-star Rating in the MarketPlace

In this article written by Feroz Pearl Louis and Gaurav Gupta , author of the book Mastering Mobile Test Automation , we will learn that the star rating system on mobile marketplaces, such as Google Play and Application Store, is a source of positive as well as negative feedback for the applications deployed by any organization. This system is used to measure various aspects of the application, such as like functionality, usability, and is a way to quantify the all-elusive measurement-defying factor that organizations yearn to measure called "user experience", besides the obvious ones, such as the appeal and aesthetics of an application's graphical user interface ( GUI ). If an organization does not spend time in testing the functionality adequately, then it may suffer the consequences and lose the market share to competitors. The challenge to enable different channels such as web applications through mobile browsers, as well as providing different native or hybrid applications to service the customers as per their preferences, often leads to a situation where organizations have to develop both a web version and a hybrid version of the application.

Getting Started

In this article by Raghuram Bharathan , author of the book  Apache Maven Cookbook , we will cover the following basic tasks related to getting started with Apache Maven: Installing Maven on Microsoft Windows Installing Maven on Mac OS X Installing Maven on Linux

Solving Some Not-so-common vCenter Issues

In this article by Chuck Mills , author of the book  vCenter Troubleshooting , we will review some of the not-so-common vCenter issues that administrators could face while they work with the vSphere environment. The article will cover the following issues and provide the solutions: The vCenter inventory shows no objects after you log in You get the VPXD must be stopped to perform this operation message Removing the vCenter plugins when they are no longer needed

Getting started with Codeception

In this article by Matteo Pescarin , the author of  Learning Yii Testing , we will get introduced to Codeception. Not everyone has been exposed to testing. The ones who actually have are aware of the quirks and limitations of the testing tools they've used. Some might be more efficient than others, and in either case, you had to rely on the situation that was presented to you: legacy code, hard to test architectures, no automation, no support whatsoever on the tools, and other setup problems, just to name a few. Only certain companies, because they have either the right skillsets or the budget, invest in testing, but most of them don't have the capacity to see beyond the point that quality assurance is important. Getting the testing infrastructure and tools in place is the immediate step following getting developers to be responsible for their own code and to test it.

1   2   3   4   5  
View:   12   24   48  
Sort By: