Mission Running in EVE Online

Exclusive offer: get 50% off this eBook here
EVE Online: ISK Strategy Guide

EVE Online: ISK Strategy Guide — Save 50%

The unofficial guide to becoming an ISK billionaire in EVE Online with this book and ebook.

$17.99    $9.00
by Y. Michael Xu | October 2012 | Games

The ISK Making Guide to EVE Online teaches you the inner workings of each ISK making career choice. Help determine the path of EVE by taking on careers like Mining and Manufacturing, the backbone of New Eden or help your empire rise above the rest by Running Missions for the corporations of your empire. While it does not take much skill to start mission running, knowing what each type of mission involves, and how to best approach it, will ensure the best results.

This article by Y. Michael Xu, author of EVE Online: ISK Strategy Guide, we help you:

  • Understand the different mission types
  • Understand how the Agent system works
  • Understand how standing works
  • Pick an agent to work for
  • Understand the rewards of mission running

(For more resources on EVE Online, see here.)

Mission types

Missions in EVE fall into five general categories: Courier, Kill, Mining, Trade, and Special missions. Courier, Kill, Mining, and Trade missions are further categorized into five different levels: level I through level V. Let's take a closer look at each category to see what each type of mission entails.

Courier missions

Courier missions are simply delivery missions where you move items from one station to another. The type of items can range from common items found on the market to mission-specific cargo containers. The size and quantity of items to move can vary greatly and can either be moved using whatever ship you are currently flying or may require the use of an industrial ship.

 

While the ISK reward for courier missions is a bit on the low side, it having no negative standing impact on opposing factions is a huge positive. This, added to the fact that courier missions are quite easy and can often be completed very quickly, means they are generally worth running. Every so often you will receive a courier mission that takes you into Low-Sec space and with the risks involved in Low-Sec, it is best to decline these missions.

You are able to decline one mission every four hours per agent without taking a negative standing hit with that agent. Be very careful when declining missions, since if your standing falls too low with an agent you will no longer be able to receive mission offers from that agent.

Kill missions

By far the most common, the most profitable, and let's be honest, the most fun missions to run are kill missions. The only thing better than flying beautiful space ships is seeing beautiful space ships blow up. There are currently two types of kill missions. In one, you warp to a set of coordinates in space where you engage NPC targets and in the other you warp to an acceleration gate which takes you into a series of pockets all connected by more acceleration gates. Think of this second type of kill mission like a dungeon with multiple rooms, in which you fight NPC targets in each of the rooms.

Kill missions are a great way to make ISK, especially when you are able to access higher-level agents. However, as you can guess, kill missions also get more and more difficult the higher the level of the agent. Another thing that you need to be very careful about when running kill missions is that you run the risk of having negative standing impact on factions opposed to the faction you are running missions for. For example, if you were running missions for the Caldari state and you completed a mission that had you destroy ships belonging to or friendly with the Gallente Federation, then you would lose standing with the Gallente. A great way to negate the standing loss is to run missions for as many agents as you can find and to decline any mission that will have you attack the ships of another empire. But remember you can only decline one mission per agent every four hours, hence having multiple agents.

Agents and how they work

Now would be a great time to take a closer look at the agent system of EVE. Each agent works in a specific division of a NPC corporation. The division that the agent works in determines the type of missions you will receive (more on this later), and the NPC corporation that the agent works for determines which faction your standing rewards will affect. An agent's information sheet is shown in the following image:

As you can see, the agent Aariwa Tenanochi works for the Home Guard in their Security division and is a level 1 agent. Aariwa can be found in the Nonni system at the Home Guard Assembly Plant located at planet III Moon 1. You can also see that the only requirement to receive missions from Aariwa is that you meet his standing requirements.

Doing the tutorial missions will allow you to access all level 1 agents for your chosen faction.

All agents are rated level 1 to level 5. The higher the level of the agent the harder their missions are, and the harder the mission the better and bigger the reward. The difficulty level of each agent level can best be described as follows:

  • Level 1: Very Easy. Designed for new players to learn about mission running and PvE in general. Frigate or destroyer for kill missions, short range and low cost items for courier and trade missions, and small amounts of low grade ore or minerals for mining missions.
  • Level 2: Easy. Still designed beginner players, but will require you to start thinking tactically. Destroyer or cruiser for kill missions, slightly longer range and higher cost items for courier and trade missions, and higher amounts of low grade ore or minerals for mining missions.
  • Level 3: Medium. You will need to have a firm understanding of how your ship works and have solid tactics for it. Battlecruiser or Heavy Assault Cruiser for kill missions, much longer range and higher cost items for courier and trade missions, and large amounts of low grade ore or minerals for mining missions.
  • Level 4: Hard. You will need to understand your ship inside out, have solid tactics, and a solid fit for your ship. Battleship for kill missions, very long range and very costly items for courier and trade missions, and very large amounts of low grade ore or minerals for mining missions.
  • Level 5: Very Hard. Same as level 4 agents but only found in Low-Sec systems and comes with all the risks of Low-Sec. It is a good idea to only do these missions in a fleet with a group of people.

The standing requirements to access the different level of agents are shown in the following table:

 

Level 1

Level 2

Level 3

Level 4

Level 5

Standing required

-

1.00

3.00

5.00

7.00

While you can use larger ships to run lower level kill missions, it is generally not a good idea. First, there can be ship limitation for a mission that does not allow you to use your larger ship and second, while your larger ship will be able to handle the incoming damage much easier, the larger weapons that your ship uses will have a harder time hitting the smaller targets. And since ammo costs ISK, it cuts into your profit per mission.

I generally like to use the cheapest ship I can get away with when running missions. This ensures that if I ever get scanned down and killed by player pirates, my loss is minimal.

Understanding your foe

The biggest key to success when running kill missions is understanding who your targets will be and how they like to fight. Whenever you are offered a kill mission by an agent, you can find out which faction your target belongs to inside the mission description, either in the text of the description or by an emblem representing your target's faction. It is important to know which faction your target belongs to because then you will know what kind of damage to expect from your target. In the mission offer shown in the following image you can see that your targets for this mission are Rogue Drones:

There are four types of damage, EM, Thermal , Kinetic, and Explosive, and each faction has a preference toward specific damage types. Once you know what kind of damage to expect you can then tailor the defense of your ship for maximum protection towards that damage. Knowing which faction your target belongs to will also tell you which type of damage you should be doing to maximize your damage output. Each faction has weaknesses towards specific damage types.

Along with what types of damage to defend against and what types of damage to utilize, knowing which faction your target belongs to will also tell you what kind of special tactic ships you may encounter in your mission. For example, the Caldari likes to use ECM to jam your targeting systems and the Amarr uses energy neutralizers to drain your ship's capacitor, leaving you unable to use weapons or even to warp away. The following table shows all the factions and the damage types to defend and use:

NPC faction

Damage type to defend

Damage type to deal

Guristas

Kinetic, Thermal

Kinetic, Thermal

Serpentis

Thermal, Kinetic

Thermal

Blood Raider

EM, Thermal

EM, Thermal

Sansha's Nation

EM, Thermal

EM, Thermal

Angel Cartel

Explosive, Kinetic, Thermal, EM

Explosive

Mordu's Legion

Kinetic, Thermal, Explosive, EM

Thermal, Kinetic

Mercenary

Kinetic, Thermal

Thermal, Kinetic

Republic Fleet

Explosive, Thermal, Kinetic, EM

Explosive, Kinetic

Caldari Navy

Kinetic, Thermal

Kinetic, Thermal

Amarr Navy

EM, Thermal, Kinetic

EM, Thermal

Federation Navy

Thermal, Kinetic

Kinetic, Thermal

Rogue Drones

Explosive, Kinetic, EM, Thermal

EM

Thukker Tribe

Explosive, Thermal

EM

CONCORD

EM, Thermal, Kinetic, Explosive

Explosive, Kinetic

Equilibrium of Mankind

Kinetic, Thermal

Kinetic, EM

You will most likely have noticed that several factions use the same damage types but they are listed in different orders. The damage types are listed this way because the damage output or weakness is not divided evenly. So for the Serpentis pirate faction for example, they prefer a combination of Kinetic and Thermal damage with a higher percentage being Kinetic damage than Thermal damage.

What ship to use to maximize earnings

The first question that most new mission runners ask is "What race of ships should I use?" While each race has its own advantages and disadvantages and are all very good choices, in my opinion Gallente drone ships are the best ships to use for mission running, from a pure ISK making stand point.

Gallente drone ships are the best when it comes to mission running because of the lack of ammo costs and the versatility they offer. With drones being your primary method of dealing damage you do not have to worry about the cost associated with needing a large supply of ammo like the Caldari or Minmatar. What about the Amarr you say? They don't need ammo. While it is true that the Amarr also do not require ammo, the heavy capacitor drain of lasers limits the amount of defense your ship can have. Drone ships do not need to fit weapons in their high slots and therefore you can fit your ship with the maximum amount of defense possible. Drone ships can also utilize the speed and range of drones to their advantage. By using modules such as the Drone Link Augmentor you can increase the range of your drones so that you can comfortably sit outside the attack range of your targets and let your drones do all the work. Being outside of the attack range also means that you are outside the range of electronic warfare, so it's a win-win situation.

The best feature of drone ships is the ability to carry different types of drones. Light Drones for frigate-sized targets, Medium Drones for cruiser-sized targets, and Heavy Drones for battleship-sized targets. You can even carry Electronic Warfare Drones that can jam your targets, drain their capacitors, or even provide more defense for your ship by way of shield or armor repairs.

How should I fit my ship?

The second most common question is "How should I have my ship fitted for mission running?" Ship fitting is very subjective and almost an art form in itself. I can easily go on for pages about the different concepts behind ship fittings and why one way is better than another but there will always be people that will disagree because what works for one person does not necessarily work for you. The best thing to do is to visit websites such as eve.battleclinic.com/browse_loadouts.php to get ideas on how ship fittings should work and to use 3rd party software such as Python Fitting Assistant to come up with fittings that suit your style of play the best.

When browsing fittings on BattleClinic, it is a good idea to make sure the filters at the bottom right are set for the most recent expansions. You wouldn't want to use a completely out-of-date fitting that will only get you killed.

Basic tactics

When you start a kill mission you will likely be faced with two different scenarios. The first is as soon as you come out of warp, targets will be on the offensive and immediately start attacking you. The second and more favorable scenario is to warp onto the field with multiple groups of targets in a semi-passive state. No matter the scenario you come across, the following are a few simple tactics will ensure everything goes that much smoother. These tactics are as follows:

  • Zoom out. I know it's hard because your ship is so pretty, but zoom the camera out. You need to be able to have a high level of situational awareness at all times and you can't do that if you're zoomed in on your ship all the time.
  • Finish each wave or group of targets before engaging other targets. This will ensure that you will never be too outnumbered and be able to more easily handle the incoming damage.
  • Kill the tacklers first. Tacklers are ships that use electronic warfare to slow your ship or to prevent you from warping away. Since flying out of range or warping away is the best way of escape when things go bad, killing off the tacklers first will give you the best chance to escape intact.
  • Kill the largest targets first. Taking out the largest targets first gives you two critical advantages. The first is you are taking a lot of the damage against you off the field and the second is that larger ships are much easier to hit.
  • Save structures for last. If part of your mission is to shoot or destroy a structure, save that for last. The majority of times, firing on a structure will cause all the hostiles to attack you at once and may even spawn stationary defenses. This tactic does not apply to defensive towers, such as missile and tackling towers. You should always kill these towers as soon as possible.

Mining missions

Mining missions come in two flavors. The first will have you travel to a set of coordinates given to you by your agent, to mine a specific amount of a specific type of ore and then return to your agent with the ore you have mined. The second will simply have you supply your agent with an amount of ore or mineral. For the second type of mining mission you can either mine and refine the ore yourself or purchase it from the market.

The ISK reward for mining missions is really bad and in general you will make more ISK if you had simply spent the time mining, but once again, having no negative standing impact on opposing factions is a huge plus. So if you are a career miner, it can be worth it for you to run these missions for the standings gain. After all, you will have to increase your standing in order to maximize your refine yield. It would be best to only accept the missions in which you already have the requested ore or mineral in your stock and to decline the rest.

Trade missions

Trade missions are simple missions that require you to provide items to your agent at a specific station. These items can either be made by you or purchased off the market.

Like courier and mining missions, the only upside to trade missions is that they can be completed without the negative standing impact on opposing factions. But with the high amount of ISK needed to complete these missions and the time involved, it is best to avoid these missions. If you choose to do these missions, check to see if the item required is on sale at the destination station. If it is on sale there, you can often purchase it and complete the mission without ever leaving your current station.

EVE Online: ISK Strategy Guide The unofficial guide to becoming an ISK billionaire in EVE Online with this book and ebook.
Published: October 2012
eBook Price: $17.99
Book Price: $29.99
See more
Select your format and quantity:

Special mission types

There are three special mission types in EVE: Storyline, Epic Arc , and Cosmos. These missions either require special conditions to be met before being offered to you or require you to seek out agents in specific systems. The primary reason to find and run special mission types is the significant standing increase they offer.

Storyline missions

Storyline missions are offered to you once you have completed 16 normal missions. These 16 missions can be for any agent as long as those agents are at the same level and belong to the same faction. Storyline missions are the same as normal missions with the only difference being a much larger standing reward. You should always complete storyline missions when they are offered.

Epic Arc missions

Epic Arcs are a series of branching missions that tell a unique story from start to finish and can only be completed once. After a few missions you will be presented with a choice of missions to continue the story by your design. These choices also signal the start of a new chapter in the Epic Arc. Chapters can vary in length but are usually around five missions long, with each Epic Arc featuring around five chapters.

If you happen to fail an Epic Arc mission, you will be taken back to the start of your current chapter.

There are five Epic Arcs in EVE, one for each of the empires and one for the Sisters of EVE. Each of the Empire Epic Arcs are level 4 missions while the Sisters of EVE Epic Arc is designed for beginners to experience the different mission types in EVE and to explore parts of all four empires.

t is a good idea to do these Epic Arc missions when they become available to you, especially the Empire arcs since you will be rewarded with very rare and expensive faction items as well as a major increase in faction standing. The agent and starting location of each Epic Arc is as follows:

Epic Arc name

Level

Agent

Corporation

Starting system

Faction

The Blood-Stained Stars

1

Sister Alitura

Sisters of EVE

Arnon IX Moon 3 - Sisters of EVE Bureau

Sisters of EVE

Right to Rule

4

Karde Romu

Ministry of Internal Order

Kor-Azor Prime

Amarr

Penumbra

4

Aursa Kunivuri

Expert Distribution

Josameto

Caldari

Syndication

4

Roineron Aviviere

Impetus

Dodixie

Gallente

Wildfire

4

Arsten Takalo

Brutor Tribe

Frarn

Minmatar

Cosmos missions

Cosmos missions are not really a type of mission but rather a constellation with agents offering unique missions that tell the story of New Eden. These agents are found in ships orbiting beacons in space rather than inside stations. These missions, which can only be completed once, offer special rewards and the largest faction station gains possible from mission running. While the rewards for these missions are very rare, the main purpose of running Cosmos missions is to rapidly increase your standing with a specific faction.

Cosmos agents are found in High-Sec systems in each of the four empires but the Amarr and Minmatar also offer Cosmos agents in Low-Sec systems. Cosmos missions are very different from normal missions in that they are usually harder and require you to be very comfortable with agents and the missions system in order to complete. Cosmos missions also differ in that these agents and mission chains are linked together by a story rather than the hierarchy of agent levels found in normal missions. This means you may have to start with a level 3 agent and then move to a level 1 agent and then back.

If you fail or decline a mission from a Cosmos agent you will lose access to that agent and the entire chain of missions linked to that agent.

It is important to know that unlike Epic Arcs, which is one full mission chain, Cosmos is made up of many small chains of missions, that link a few agents together. It can be very confusing since you may speak to an agent who will ask you for a prerequisite item prior to offering you a mission without letting you know which agent you need to speak with to get that item. The last thing you want is to fail a mission because you could not get the prerequisite item. A full listing and the recommended order in which to run the Cosmos for each empire can be found at www.hb3.info/cosmos/ . The site is in German so have Google Translate ready if you can't read German.

Faction ship agents

Within each of the Cosmos constellations are also special agents that will take high level NPC pirate dog tags in exchange for copies of faction ship blueprints. Depending on your faction standing you can either receive a faction frigate, cruiser, or battleship blueprint copy, or BPC. Each reward BPC will allow you to make two ships. You will need at least a faction standing of 8.5 out of 10.0 to interact with these agents so it is best to wait until after you have completed the Cosmos chains. A full listing of all faction ship agents is shown in the following table:

Amarr

Agent

Level

System

Location

Required Items

Required Standing

Reward BPC

Mandor Neek

4

Jakri

Garisas Gate

30 Sansha Silver Tags

8.5

Imperial Navy Slicer

Jeeta Neek

4

Jakri

Garisas Gate

30 Sansha Gold Tags

9.2

Random Amarr Faction Cruiser

Zaestra Kuramor

4

Jakri

Garisas Gate

30 Sansha Diamond Tags

9.9

Random Amarr Faction Battleship

 

Caldari

Agent

Level

System

Location

Required Items

Required Standing

Reward BPC

Kaiko Maina

4

Otitoh

Friggi Gate

30 Guristas Silver Tags

8.5

Caldari Navy Hookbill

Emma Tharkin

4

Otitoh

Friggi Gate

30 Guristas Gold Tags

9.2

Random Caldari Faction Cruiser

Zoun Makui

4

Otitoh

Friggi Gate

30 Gruistas Diamond Tags

9.9

Random Caldari Faction Battleship

 

Gallente

Agent

Level

System

Location

Required Items

Required Standing

Reward BPC

Jordan Usquen

4

Jolia

Augnais Gate

30 Serpentis Silver Tags

8.5

Federation Navy Comet

Babalu Wrezka

4

Jolia

Augnais Gate

30 Serpentis Gold Tags

9.2

Random Gallente Faction Cruiser

Timmothy Sawyr

4

Jolia

Augnais Gate

30 Serpentis Diamond Tags

9.9

Random Gallente Faction Battleship

 

Minmatar

Agent

Level

System

Location

Required Items

Required Standing

Reward BPC

Mutama Czeik

4

Barkrik

Hjoramold Gate

30 Angel Silver Tags

8.5

Republic Fleet Firetail

Thora Desto

4

Barkirk

Hjoramold Gate

30 Angel Gold Tags

9.2

Random Minmatar Faction Cruiser

Makor Desto

4

Barkirk

Hjoramold Gate

30 Angel Diamond Tags

9.9

Random Minmatar Faction Battleship

The required standing for each of the Faction ship agents is your base faction standing before any skill modifiers.

Data Center agents

Since we are talking about Cosmos missions and the primary reason for running Cosmos missions is the standings gain, I want to mention a special type of agent that can be found in each of the four empires, the Data Center agents. Data Center agents will take NPC pirate dog tags in exchange for standings gain. The systems and locations of where Data Center agents can be found are listed in the following table:

Empire

Systems

Location

Amarr

Ferira, Polfaly, Kudi

State Data Center

Caldari

Kamokor, Saikanen, Ahtulaima

State Data Center

Gallente

Muer, Abenync, Ekuenbiron

State Data Center

Minmatar

Emolgranlan, Arlulf, Engosi

State Data Center

You can only interact with each Data Center agent once and each agent will require 20 NPC dog tags for your standings reward. It is a good idea to have the required amount of dog tags for each agent level before speaking to any agent; this way you will always have the right tags and the right amount. The dog tag type needed for each agent level is shown in the following table:

Agent Level

Pirate Dog Tag Type

1

Copper, Bronze

2

Silver, Brass

3

Palladium, Gold, Electrum

4

Crystal, Platinum, Diamond

Picking an agent

Now that you have a better understanding of what each type of mission involves, it is time to find an agent and start mission running. To start the search for your agent, click on the Agent Finder button located in your station services panel as shown in the following image:

You should then get a new window like the one in the following image. As you can see, the filter options are very extensive and allow you to find the exact type of agent you want to run missions for. The results of your search will be listed six at a time sorted by range to your current system. Let's take a closer look at each of the filter options:

Agent level

At the very top of the Agent Finder is a slider for the level of agents. You need to make sure this slider is in the correct position since it will only return search results for the selected level.

Agent faction

The first filter you can apply is the Faction filter, which will allow you to limit your agent search to a specific faction. Currently every faction in EVE is selectable under the Faction filter with the exception of CONCORD and the Jovian Directorate. It is a good idea to select a faction here if for nothing else but to narrow the choices for later filters. Just keep in mind however that when selecting NPC pirate factions, your agents will be located in Low and Null-Sec systems.

Corporation and agent type

The next two filters in the agent finder are Corporation and Agent Type. Corporation will limit your search to a specific corporation. This filter can also be used in connection to the Faction filter to limit the choices of corporations shown. The Corporation filter is largely meaningless unless you want to role-play your character as an ally of a specific Corp and hostile towards everyone else.

The Agent Type filter however is very important. This filter will determine the type of missions you will receive from your agent. The type of agent is represented by the division in which the agent works. It is worth noting here that CCP has announced plans to make it easier for you to only get the mission type of your choosing, but for now this is how things work. The different agent types and the types of mission offered are listed in the following table:

Division

Mission type

Distribution

Courier and Trade Missions

Factional Warfare

Kill Missions

Mining

Mining Missions

R&D

Courier and Trade Missions

Security

Kill Missions

Storyline

Varies by each agent

There are three special types of agents: Factional Warfare , R&D, and Storyline agents.

Factional Warfare agents

Factional Warfare agents can only be accessed after you have enlisted for factional warfare with the militia of your chosen faction. The missions offered by factional warfare agents will always be to kill missions and will always require you to fly into enemy-controlled space to complete. Warping to the mission location will also broadcast your location to everyone in the system. This will allow any player of your enemy faction to come and attack you. Factional Warfare agent missions are the only missions in which there is an almost guaranteed chance of PvP combat. Rewards for these missions are identical to normal missions.

 

R&D agents

R&D agents are special agents that generate RP, or research points. The RP you receive will be in a specific field of study offered by the agent. The character information sheet of a R&D is shown in the next image:

From the character information sheet you can tell that this agent Taksabe Jishadan is a level 1 R&D agent working for the LAI DAI corporation. The fields of study offered by Taksabe are Caldari Starship Engineering level 1 and Electromagnetic Physics level 1 . In order to work with Taksabe you will need to have either the Caldari Starship Engineering or Electromagnetic Physics skill trained to level 1 as well as meeting Taksabe's standing requirments.

A few days after starting a research project with an R&D agent, you will start receiving one mission offer a day from that agent. The mission will be either a courier or trade mission and the reward is the amount of RP generated by that agent in one day, effectively doubling the RP output of the agent for the day.>

R&D agents are a great way to generate passive ISK income. The RP received from the agent can then be used to purchase Datacores, which are a critical part of Invention for tech II item production. The only downside to R&D agents is that the science skills needed for these research projects cost 10 million ISK each, which can be prohibitive if you are fairly new to EVE. While RP is generated passively, you will have to travel around to collect your Datacores and then sell them on the market to actually earn ISK.

In the latest expansion to EVE, all Datacore now cost 100 RP to purchase and give the same bonus to their field of study. CCP has also stated that this will most likely be the first of a series of changes to Datacore, depending on player feedback.

Storyline agents

Storyline agents, not to be confused with Storyline missions, are agents that offer a short mission chain. The type of missions you will receive is determined by the division of the agent starting the chain. Each agent that follows in the mission chain will offer the same type of mission so you don't have to worry about getting a kill mission if you started with courier missions.

It is always worth your time to find and work with Storyline agents, as they offer increased standing rewards for each mission you complete.

EVE Online: ISK Strategy Guide The unofficial guide to becoming an ISK billionaire in EVE Online with this book and ebook.
Published: October 2012
eBook Price: $17.99
Book Price: $29.99
See more
Select your format and quantity:

Resources for Article :



Further resources on this subject:


Books From Packt


GameSalad Beginner’s Guide
GameSalad Beginner’s Guide

The Game Jam Survival Guide
The Game Jam Survival Guide

 Runescape Gold Strategy Guide
Runescape Gold Strategy Guide

Away3D 3.6 Essentials
Away3D 3.6 Essentials

 Box2D for Flash Games
Box2D for Flash Games

 Blender Game Engine: Beginner’s Guide
Blender Game Engine: Beginner’s Guide

 ZBrush 4 Sculpting for Games: Beginner's Guide
ZBrush 4 Sculpting for Games: Beginner's Guide

 Panda3D 1.6 Game Engine Beginner's Guide
Panda3D 1.6 Game Engine Beginner's Guide


No votes yet

Post new comment

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
h
1
6
d
U
4
Enter the code without spaces and pay attention to upper/lower case.
Code Download and Errata
Packt Anytime, Anywhere
Register Books
Print Upgrades
eBook Downloads
Video Support
Contact Us
Awards Voting Nominations Previous Winners
Judges Open Source CMS Hall Of Fame CMS Most Promising Open Source Project Open Source E-Commerce Applications Open Source JavaScript Library Open Source Graphics Software
Resources
Open Source CMS Hall Of Fame CMS Most Promising Open Source Project Open Source E-Commerce Applications Open Source JavaScript Library Open Source Graphics Software