Web Services

Using Business Rules to Define Decision Points in Oracle SOA Suite: Part 2

by Matt Wright | March 2009 | Architecture & Analysis BPEL SOA Web Services Java Oracle Web Development

In the previous part of the article we looked at how we can use the Oracle Business Rules engine to implement business rules, and how we can invoke these from within BPEL as a decision service.

In this part by Matt Wright, we will have a look at how to create a Decision Service.

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Using Business Rules to Define Decision Points in Oracle SOA Suite: Part 1

by Matt Wright | March 2009 | Architecture & Analysis BPEL SOA Web Services Java Web Development

In this two part article by Matt Wright, we will look at how we can use the Business Rules engine to externalize rules from a BPEL process into a separate decision service. Once we've done this, we will know how to invoke the rule from a BPEL process. At run time there may be many potential paths through a BPEL process, controlled by conditional statements such as switch or while activities. Typically the business rules that govern which path to take at any given point are written as XPath expressions embedded within the appropriate activity.

Although this is an acceptable approach, we often find that while the process itself may be relatively static, the business rules embedded within the activities may change on a more frequent basis. This will require us to update the BPEL process and redeploy it even though the process flow itself hasn't changed. In addition, by embedding the rule directly within the decision point, we often end up having to re-implement the same rule every time it is used, either within the same process or across multiple processes. Apart from being inefficient, this can lead to inconsistent implementations of the rules as well as requiring us to update the rule in multiple places every time it changes.

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Understanding Business Activity Monitoring in Oracle SOA Suite

by Matt Wright | March 2009 | Architecture & Analysis BPEL SOA Web Services Java Oracle Web Development

The key objective driving service-oriented architecture is to move the IT organization closer to the business. Creation of services and their assembly into composite applications and processes is the mechanism by which IT can move to be more responsive to the business. However, it is the provision of real-time business information via dashboards that really gives business the confidence that IT can deliver. In this article by Matt Wright, we will examine how to use BAM (Business Activity Monitoring).

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New SOA Capabilities in BizTalk Server 2009: UDDI Services

by Richard Seroter | April 2009 | .NET BPEL Microsoft SOA Web Services

In this article by Richard Seroter, you will learn about the new SOA capabilities in a BizTalk Server 2009, mainly the UDDI services. It seems that Microsoft is reinforcing BizTalk Server's role in a service-oriented architecture by moving their UDDI Services into the BizTalk Server 2009 product. In this article, we discuss what UDDI is, and how to use its capabilities in your environment. You will learn to add services to UDDI registry and also building subscription alerts for service changes.

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New SOA Capabilities in BizTalk Server 2009: WCF SQL Server Adapter

by Richard Seroter | April 2009 | .NET BPEL Microsoft SOA Web Services

In this article by Richard Seroter, you will learn what's WCF SQL Adapter, how to go about executing composite transactions, polling for data, and using SQL Server Query notifications.

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Service Oriented Java Business Integration - What's & Why's

by Binildas A. Christudas | April 2008 | BPEL SOA Web Services Java Open Source

Many of you as (Java) programmers generate business purpose code, like "confirming an order" or "find available products". At times, you may also want to connect to external systems and services, since your application in isolation alone will not provide you the required functionality. When the number of such connections increases, you would be generating more and more of "integration code", mixed along with your business code.

In this short article, Binildas A. Christudas introduces the Java Business Integration (JBI) specification and discusses how it is covered in his new book, Service Oriented Java Business Integration

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Introduction to Re-Host based Modernization Using Tuxedo

by Jason Williamson,Tom Laszewski,Mark Rakhmilevich | September 2008 | Architecture & Analysis BPEL SOA Web Services Java Oracle

The re-architecture approach reduces the mainframe costs and legacy risks by migrating the application off the mainframe and re-structuring it using all the modern software tools and capabilities at our disposal. However, this very process of re-structuring the application, and essentially re-building it using knowledge and business rules mined from existing code, introduces certain risks. How can we ensure that the new application maintains functional equivalence, and operational characteristics of the original? Can we meet the performance and scalability requirements not only of the current environment, but future growth needs as well? Can we deliver the new application within the time and budget constraints agreed to at the beginning of the project? The older the application, the larger its scope and volume of code, and the fewer original developers available, the higher these risks may be.

This article by Jason Williamson, Tom Laszewski and Mark Rakhmilevich, takes a look at an alternative approach that attempts to balance these risks in a different way. Re-host-based modernization approach is focused on migrating the application off the mainframe to a compatible software stack on an open-systems platform, preserving the language and middleware services on which the application has been built. It protects legacy investment by relying on a mainframe-compatible software stack to minimize any changes in the core application, and preserve the application's business logic intact, while running it on an open-system platform using more flexible and less expensive system infrastructure. It keeps open the customer's options for SOA enablement and re-architecture, by using an SOA-ready middleware stack to support Web services and ESB interfaces for re-hosted components. And using an extensible platform with transparent integration to J2EE components, BPM-based processes, and other key tools of the re-architecture approach means you can start to re-architect selected components at will, without requiring changes to the re-hosted services running the remainder of the business logic.

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Need for Java Business Integration and Service Engines in NetBeans

by David Salter Frank Jennings | February 2008 | Architecture & Analysis BPEL SOA Web Services Java Open Source

To gain a greater understanding of concept of SOA applications, BPEL processes and JBI applications, and to enable us to develop enterprise level SOA applications, we need to understand JBI in further depth, and how JBI components can be linked together. This article by Frank Jennings and David Salter will show the JBI Service Engine is supported within the NetBeans Enterprise Pack.

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Business Process Modeling

by Kapil Pant | August 2008 | BPEL SOA Web Services Oracle

A business process is a set of coordinated activities that are performed either by humans or by tools with an objective to realize a certain business result. The order of these activities and the efficiency of those who perform the activities determine the overall performance of a business process. It is very much in the interest of every company to have business processes that are efficient and include only necessary activities, because this will allow them to work faster and more efficiently. In this article by Matjaz B. Juric and Kapil Pant, we will look at business process modeling, the main objective of which is to develop a process model that defines the existing process flow in detail.

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