Unity Android Game Development by Example Beginner's Guide


Unity Android Game Development by Example Beginner's Guide
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Overview
Table of Contents
Author
Support
Sample Chapters
  • Enter the increasingly popular mobile market and create games using Unity 3D and Android
  • Learn optimization techniques for efficient mobile games
  • Clear, step-by-step instructions for creating a complete mobile game experience

Book Details

Language : English
Paperback : 320 pages [ 235mm x 191mm ]
Release Date : December 2013
ISBN : 1849692017
ISBN 13 : 9781849692014
Author(s) : Thomas Finnegan
Topics and Technologies : All Books, Game Development, Unity, Android, Mobile, Beginner's Guides


Table of Contents

Preface
Chapter 1: Saying Hello to Unity and Android
Chapter 2: Looking Good – Graphical Interface
Chapter 3: The Backbone of Any Game – Meshes, Materials, and Animations
Chapter 4: Setting the Stage – Camera Effects and Lighting
Chapter 5: Getting Around – Pathfinding and AI
Chapter 6: Specialties of the Mobile Device – Touch and Tilt
Chapter 7: Throwing Your Weight Around – Physics and a 2D Camera
Chapter 8: Special Effects – Sound and Particles
Chapter 9: Optimization
Pop Quiz Answers
Index
  • Chapter 1: Saying Hello to Unity and Android
    • Understanding what makes Unity great
    • Understanding what makes Android great
    • Understanding how Unity and Android work together
    • Differences between Pro and Basic
      • License comparison overview
    • Setting up the development environment
    • Time for action – installing the JDK
    • Time for action – installing the Android SDK
    • Time for action – installing Unity 3D
    • Optional code editor
    • Connecting to a device
    • Time for action – simple device connection
    • Time for action – connecting trickier devices
    • Unity Remote
    • Building a simple application
    • Time for action – Hello World
    • Summary
  • Chapter 2: Looking Good – Graphical Interface
    • Creating a Tic-tac-toe game
    • Time for action – creating Tic-tac-toe
    • Finishing the game
    • Time for action – finish creating the game
    • GUI Skins and GUI Styles
    • A prettier form of Tic-tac-toe
    • Time for action – styling the game
    • Dynamic positioning
    • Time for action – the dynamic GUI
    • A better way to build to device
    • Time for action – build and run
    • Summary
  • Chapter 3: The Backbone of Any Game – Meshes, Materials, and Animations
    • Setting up
    • Time for action – the setup
    • Importing the meshes
    • Time for action – importing the tank
    • Tank import settings
      • Setting up the tank
    • Time for action – creating the tank
    • Time for action – keeping score
    • Time for action – controlling the chassis
    • Time for action – controlling the turret
    • Time for action – putting the pieces together
    • Creating the materials
    • Time for action – creating the city
    • Time for action – moving treads
    • Animations
      • The target's animations
    • Time for action – setting up target's animations
      • State machines
    • Time for action – creating the target state machine
    • Time for action – scripting the target
      • Creating the prefab
    • Time for action – creating the target
    • Ray tracing to shoot
    • Time for action – simple shooting
    • Summary
  • Chapter 4: Setting the Stage – Camera Effects and Lighting
    • The camera effects
      • Skyboxes and distance fog
    • Time for action – adding a skybox and distance fog
      • Target indicator
    • Time for action – creating the pointer
    • Time for action – controlling the indicator
    • Time for action – working with a second camera
      • Turbo boost
    • Time for action – using the boost effect
    • Lights
    • Time for action – adding more lights
      • Lightmaps
    • Time for action – creating a lightmap
      • Cookies
    • Time for action – applying headlights
    • Blob shadow
    • Time for action – a tank with a shadow
    • Summary
  • Chapter 5: Getting Around – Pathfinding and AI
    • Understanding AI and pathfinding
    • The NavMesh
    • Time for action – creating the NavMesh
    • The NavMeshAgent component
    • Time for action – creating the enemy
    • The chase
    • Time for action – the player is over here
    • Time for action – chasing the player
    • Being attacked
    • Time for action – getting ready to fire
    • Attacking the enemy
    • Time for action – giving it a weakness
    • Spawning
    • Time for action – creating spawns
    • Summary
  • Chapter 6: Specialties of the Mobile Device – Touch and Tilt
    • Setting up
    • Time for action – creating the project
    • Controlling with tilt
    • Time for action – steering the space ship
      • Making things move in space
    • Time for action – flying asteroids
      • Adding space collisions
    • Time for action – adding collisions
      • Creating the enemy
    • Time for action – adding an enemy ship
    • Controlling with touch
    • Time for action – touch to shoot
      • Spawning in space
    • Time for action – creating a space spawn
    • Summary
  • Chapter 7: Throwing Your Weight Around – Physics and a 2D Camera
    • 2D games in a 3D world
    • Time for action – preparing the world
    • Physics
      • Building blocks
    • Time for action – creating planks
      • Physics materials
    • Time for action – sliding and bouncing
    • Characters
      • The enemy
    • Time for action – creating the pigs
      • The ally
    • Time for action – creating the red bird
    • Controls
      • Attacking
    • Time for action – creating the slingshot
      • Watching
    • Time for action – controlling the camera
    • A better background
    • Time for action – creating the parallax background
    • The flock variety
      • The yellow bird
    • Time for action – creating the yellow bird
      • The blue bird
    • Time for action – creating the blue bird
      • The black bird
    • Time for action – creating the black bird
    • Level selection
    • Time for action – creating the level selection
    • Summary
  • Chapter 8: Special Effects – Sound and Particles
    • Understanding audio
      • Import settings
      • Audio Listener
      • Audio Source
      • Adding background music
    • Time for action – adding background music
      • Creating an alarm system
    • Time for action – warning the player
    • Understanding particle systems
      • Particle system settings
      • Creating engine trails
    • Time for action – adding engine trails
    • Putting it together
      • Explosions
    • Time for action – adding explosions
      • Creating laser blasts
    • Time for action – adding laser blasts
    • Summary
  • Chapter 9: Optimization
    • Minimizing the application footprint
      • Editor log
      • Asset compression
        • Models
        • Model tab
        • Rig tab
        • Animations tab
        • Textures
        • Audio
      • Player settings
        • Rendering
        • Optimization
    • Tracking performance
      • Editor statistics
      • The Profiler
      • Tracking script performance
    • Time for action – tracking scripts
    • Minimizing lag
    • Occlusion
    • Time for action – occluding tanks
      • Points to remember
    • Summary

Thomas Finnegan

Thomas Finnegan completed his graduation from Brown College in 2010. Since then, he has worked on everything from mobile platforms to web development, and even experimental devices. He now works as a freelance game developer. Past clients include Carmichael Lynch, Coleco, and Subaru. His most recent project is Battle Box 3D, a virtual table top. Currently he is teaching game development at the Minneapolis Media Institute in Minnesota.
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Please let us know if you have found any errors not listed on this list by completing our errata submission form. Our editors will check them and add them to this list. Thank you.


Errata

- 5 submitted: last submission 18 Jul 2014

Errata type: Typo | Page No: 148

 

It is: The second is to uncheck Naviagation Static for the top-level object in the Hierarchy window and, when Unity asks if we want to make the change for all children objects, reply with a yes.

It should be: The second is to uncheck Navigation Static for the top-level object in the Hierarchy window and, when Unity asks if we want to make the change for all children objects, reply with a yes.

Errata type: Code related | Page no: 166

It is: public bool CanSpawn() {

  if(current != null) return false;

It should be: public bool CanSpawn() {

  if(currentTank != null) return false;

Errata type: Code related | Page no: 177'

It is: other.position -= playerRotation * Vector3.forward * use.speed * Time.deltaTime;

It should be: other.position -= use.transform.rotation * Vector3.forward * use.speed * Time.deltaTime;

 

Errata type: Code related | Page no: 205

It is: private static gameOver = false;

It should be: private static bool gameOver = false; 

 

Errata type: Code related | Page no: 212

It is: ReadyNextBird();

        SetWaitPositions();

It should be: ReadyNextBird();

                   SetWaitingPositions();

Sample chapters

You can view our sample chapters and prefaces of this title on PacktLib or download sample chapters in PDF format.

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What you will learn from this book

  • Set up a development environment to work with both Unity and Android
  • Import and work with the basic building blocks of a game: meshes, materials, and animations
  • Utilize particles and sound effects to provide feedback to the player
  • Adjust camera effects and game logic to create 2D games
  • Interface with touch and tilt inputs to create custom control systems
  • Set up path finding to create intelligently moving characters
  • Successfully create custom graphical interfaces
  • Set up and utilize physics to create a mobile game classic
  • Create dynamically lit scenes using lightmaps
  • Understand the best choices for optimizing a game for the mobile platform

In Detail

Powerful and continuing to grow, the mobile market has never been bigger and more demanding of great games. Android continues to prove itself as a strong contender in this challenging market. With Unity 3D, great games can be made for Android quickly and easily. With its great deployment system, the Android platform is now only one click away.

Unity Android Game Development by Example Beginner's Guide dives straight into making real, fully-functional games, with hands-on examples and step-by-step instructions to give you a firm grounding in Unity 3D and Android. Everything necessary for creating a complete gaming experience is covered and detailed throughout the course of this book.

Using clear and practical examples that progressively build upon each other, this book guides you through the process of creating games in Unity for Android.

Start by learning about all the great features that Unity and Android have to offer. Next, create a Tic-Tac-Toe game while learning all about interfaces. After that, learn about meshes, materials, and animations with the creation of a tank battle game. You will then learn how to expand your game's environment with the addition of shadows and a skybox. Adding on this, you will also learn how to expand the tank battle by creating enemies and using path finding to chase the player. Next, explore touch and tilt controls with the creation of a space fighter game. Then, learn about physics while recreating the most popular mobile game on the market. You will then expand the space fighter game with the addition of all the special effects that make a game great. Finally, complete your experience by learning the optimization techniques required to keep your games running smoothly.

While Unity is available for both Mac and Windows, the book is presented working from a Windows environment. Programming in Unity is possible in C#, JavaScript, and Boo. This book will be working in C# and the final projects will be provided in C# and JavaScript.

From nothing to a fully-featured mobile game, Unity Android Game Development by Example Beginner's Guide takes you through everything it takes to create your next game for the Android platform.

Approach

Unity Android Game Development by Example Beginner's Guide consists of different game application examples. No prior experience with programming, Android, or Unity is required. You will learn everything from scratch and will have an organized flow of information specifically designed for complete beginners to Unity.

Who this book is for

Great for developers new to Unity, Android, or both, this book will walk you through everything you need to know about game development for the Android mobile platform. No experience with programming, Android, or Unity is required. Most of the assets used in each chapter project are provided with the book, but it is assumed that you have some access to basic image and model creation software. You will also need access to an Android powered device.

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