PHP

Sessions and Users in PHP 5 CMS

by Martin Brampton | August 2010 | Content Management Open Source PHP Web Development

In this article, by Martin Brampton author of PHP 5 CMS Framework Development, we get into the detailed questions involved in providing continuity for people using our websites. Almost any framework to support web content needs to handle this issue robustly, and efficiently. In this article, we will look at the need for sessions, and the PHP mechanism that makes them work. There are security issues to be handled, as sessions are a well known source of vulnerabilities. Search engine bots can take an alarmingly large portion of your site bandwidth, and special techniques can be used to minimize their impact on session handling. Actual mechanisms for handling sessions are provided. Session data has to be stored somewhere, and it is better to take charge of this task rather than leave it to PHP. A simple but fully effective session data handler is developed using database storage.

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Creating a Recent Comments Widget in Agile

by Jeffrey Winesett | August 2010 | Open Source PHP Web Development

In this article by Jeffery Winesett, author of Agile Web Application Development with Yii1.1 and PHP5, we are going to turn our focus to the second primary goal of this iteration. As seen in the previous article Adding User Comments in Agile, we now have the ability to leave comments on issues.

We want to display to the user a list of all of the recent comments that have been left on various issues across all of the projects. This will provide a nice snapshot of user communication activity within the application. We also want to build this small block of content in a manner that will allow it to be re-used in various different locations throughout the site. This is very much in the style of web portal applications such as news forums, weather reporting applications and sites such as Yahoo and iGoogle. These small snippets of content are often referred to as portlets, and this is why we referred to building a portlet architecture at the beginning of this iteration. Again, you can refer to http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portlet for more information on this topic.

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Adding User Comments in Agile

by Jeffrey Winesett | August 2010 | Open Source PHP Web Development

The ability for users to engage in a dialogue about project issues is an important part of what any issue tracking tool should provide. One way to achieve this is to allow users to leave comments directly on the issues. The comments will form a conversation about the issue and provide an immediate, as well as historical context to help track the full lifespan of any issue. We will also use comments to demonstrate using Yii widgets and establishing a portlet model for delivering content to the user (for more information on Portlets , visit http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portlet ).

In this article by Jeffery Winesett, author of Agile Web Application Development with Yii1.1 and PHP5, we will focus on some of the nice-to-have features in our TrackStar application. The first of these features that we will tackle is the ability for users to leave comments on project issues.

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Agile with Yii 1.1 and PHP5: The TrackStar Application

by Jeffrey Winesett | August 2010 | Open Source PHP Web Development

In order to understand the framework in the context of a real-world application, we need to build something that will more closely resemble the types of applications web developers actually have to build. That is exactly what we are going to be doing.

In this article by Jeffery Winesett, author of Agile Web Application Development with Yii1.1 and PHP5, we introduce the project task tracking application called TrackStar. There are many other project management and issue tracking applications out there in the world, and the basic functionality of ours will not be any different from many of these. So why build it, you ask? It turns out that this type of user-based application has many features that are common to a great many web applications out there. This will allow us to achieve two primary goals:

  • Showcase Yii's incredible utility and feature set as we build useful functionality and conquer real-world web application challenges
  • Provide real-world examples and approaches that will be immediately applicable to your next web application project
Read Agile with Yii 1.1 and PHP5: The TrackStar Application in full

Amazon SimpleDB versus RDBMS

by Prabhakar Chaganti Rich Helms | June 2010 | Enterprise Articles Java PHP

In this article by Prabhakar Chaganti and Rich Helms, authors of Amazon SimpleDB Developer Guide, you'll see the differences between SimpleDB and a traditional RDBMS, as well as the pros and cons of using SimpleDB as the storage engine in your application.

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Hands-on Tutorial for Getting Started with Amazon SimpleDB

by Prabhakar Chaganti Rich Helms | May 2010 | Enterprise Articles Java PHP Web Development

With Amazon SimpleDB you can scale your application's database on the cloud. In this article by Prabhakar Chaganti and Rich Helms, authors of Amazon SimpleDB Developer Guide, we going to sign up for an AWS account, download and install the necessary libraries, and create little code snippets for exploring SimpleDB. We will introduce the libraries as well as the SimpleDB Firefox plugin for manipulating SimpleDB. We will also examine the two methods for accessing SimpleDB: SOAP and ReST. For PHP users we will introduce the PHP sample library. You can install the samples on your PHP5 server so that you can try the samples as you read about them.

In this article we will:

  • Set up an AWS account
  • Enable SimpleDB service for the account
  • Install and set up libraries for Java, PHP, and Python
  • Illustrate several SimpleDB operations using these libraries
Read Hands-on Tutorial for Getting Started with Amazon SimpleDB in full

Installing and Configuring Joomla! on Local and Remote Servers

by Timi Ogunjobi | May 2010 | Joomla! Content Management PHP Web Development

This article by Timi Ogunjobi, author of Joomla! 1.5 Site Blueprints, covers basic details about installing and configuring Joomla! for use on both local and remote servers. This article also contains information about where to obtain essential resources for learning, using, and optimizing Joomla!

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Building a News Aggregating Site in Joomla!

by Timi Ogunjobi | May 2010 | Joomla! Content Management Open Source PHP Web Development

Bad news is always good news for the press. This is why Vaughan Pyre has decided to take advantage of this fact and creates a website that will aggregate bad news and weird happenings from all over the world. In this article by Timi Ogunjobi, author of Joomla! 1.5 Site Blueprints, the content of the site will be entirely derived from Really Simple Syndication (RSS) feeds from several sources (each feed being automatically fetched and its items displayed on the website).

Weird Hap'nins requirements will be the need to:

  • Get external feed sources and allocate them to menu links on the website
  • Create the means to automatically fetch and display article items located in the feeds
  • Display the latest content from all feed sources on the front page
Read Building a News Aggregating Site in Joomla! in full

User Authentication with Codeigniter 1.7 using Facebook Connect

by Adam Griffiths | May 2010 | Open Source PHP Web Development

In a previous article we covered User Authentication with Codeigniter 1.7 using Twitter oAuth. In this article by Adam Griffiths, author of CodeIgniter 1.7 Professional Development, we will continue our discussion on how we can utilize third-party authentication methods by using Facebook Connect.

Facebook Connect is just like Twitter oAuth, but for Facebook accounts. It doesn't use the oAuth protocol, so its workings might seem slightly different to developers. To users, however, the difference is marginal. Just like in Twitter oAuth, users do not need to enter any of their account credentials on your website or application—it is all handled by Facebook.

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User Authentication with Codeigniter 1.7 using Twitter oAuth

by Adam Griffiths | May 2010 | Open Source PHP Web Development

User authentication is an important part of many applications. Let's look at how we would utilize third-party authentication methods. oAuth is an open protocol for secure user authentication across APIs. It allows users to gain limited access to websites by using their Twitter credentials. It's a very sound method of user authentication, and doesn't take too much work to get going. Twitter oAuth is used by hundreds of third-party Twitter clients and mashups—just to give you an idea of how useful it can be.

In this article by Adam Griffiths, author of CodeIgniter 1.7 Professional Development, we will:

  • Learn how Twitter oAuth works
  • Create a library for authentication
  • Utilize the library in order to create an application to demonstrate how it works
Read User Authentication with Codeigniter 1.7 using Twitter oAuth in full
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