MySQL

Self-service Business Intelligence, Creating Value from Data

by Simon Lidberg | September 2013 | Enterprise Articles Microsoft MySQL

This article created by Simon Lidberg the author of Getting Started with SQL Server 2012 Cube Development, serves as an introduction to Business Intelligence solutions and specifically self-service solutions.

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Creating a new forum

by Rhys Wynne | August 2013 | MySQL e-Commerce Open Source PHP

This article by Rhys Wynne, author of bbPress Complete, covers how to create a forum in bbPress.

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HBase Administration, Performance Tuning

by Yifeng Jiang | August 2012 | Cookbooks MySQL Content Management Open Source Oracle PHP

Performance is one of the most interesting characteristics of an HBase cluster's behavior. It is a challenging operation for administrators, because performance tuning requires deep understanding of not only HBase but also of Hadoop, Java Virtual Machine Garbage Collection (JVM GC), and important tuning parameters of an operating system.

The structure of a typical HBase cluster is shown in the following diagram:

There are several components in the cluster—the ZooKeeper cluster, the HBase master node , region servers, the Hadoop Distributed File System(HDFS) and the HBase client.

The ZooKeeper cluster acts as a coordination service for the entire HBase cluster, handling master selection, root region server lookup, node registration, and so on. The master node does not do heavy tasks. Its job includes region allocation and failover, log splitting, and load balancing. Region servers hold the actual regions; they handle I/O requests to the hosting regions, flush the in-memory data store (MemStore) to HDFS, and split and compact regions. HDFS is the place where HBase stores its data files (StoreFile) and write ahead logs (WAL). We usually have an HBase region server running on the same machine as the HDFS DataNode, but it is not mandatory.

The HBase client provides APIs to access the HBase cluster. To communicate with the cluster, clients need to find the region server holding a specific row key range; this is called region lookups. HBase has two system tables to support region lookups—the -ROOT- table and the .META. table.

The -ROOT-table is used to refer to regions in the .META.table, while the .META.table holds references to all user regions. First, the clients query ZooKeeper to find the -ROOT-table location (the region server where it is deployed); they then query the -ROOT-table, and subsequently the .META.table, to find the region server holding a specific region. Clients also cache region locations to avoid querying ZooKeeper, -ROOT-, and .META.tables every time. With this background knowledge, we will describe how to tune HBase to gain better performance, in this article.

Besides HBase itself, other tuning points include Hadoop configurations, the JVM garbage collection settings, and the OS kernel parameters. These are as important as tuning HBase itself. We will also include recipes to tune these configurations, in this article.

In this article, by Yifeng Jiang, author of HBase Administration Cookbook, we will cover:

  • Setting up Hadoop to spread disk I/O
  • Using a network topology script to make the Hadoop rack-aware
  • Mounting disks with noatimeand nodiratime
  • Setting vm.swappinessto 0 to avoid swap
  • Java GC and HBase heap settings
  • Using compression
  • Managing compactions
  • Managing a region split
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Administrating the MySQL Server

by Marc Delisle | February 2012 | MySQL Content Management PHP

In this article wirtten by Marc Delisle, author of Mastering phpMyAdmin 3.4 for Effective MySQL Management, we will discus how a system administrator can use the phpMyAdmin server-management features for day-to-day user account maintenance, server verification, and server protection. The subject of how non-administrators can obtain server information from phpMyAdmin is also covered.

Server administration is mostly done via the Server view, which is accessed via the menu tabs available on phpMyAdmin's home page.

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Customizing the Menus Menu in Joomla!

by Hagen Graf | April 2008 | Joomla! MySQL Content Management Open Source PHP

There are numerous menus in the front end of every application. They are often displayed as standalone boxes. The menu items are generally arranged one below the other. Menus can also be integrated into the design horizontally so that at first sight they aren't even recognizable as cohesive menus. CSS menus, which can even be transparent, are very cool.

These menus and the menu links are dynamically administered in Joomla! from database content in the Menus work area. Joomla! has six different menus in the sample data. (main menu, top menu, other menu, user menu, example pages, and key concepts) In this article by Hagen Graf, we will discuss administering, creating and managing menus in Joomla!

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Questions & Answers with MariaDB's Michael "Monty" Widenius- Founder of MySQL AB

by | April 2011 | MySQL Open Source Web Development

Believe in Open Source

 

 

 

 

Michael “Monty” Widenius

Michael “Monty” Widenius - Monty was the Main Developer of the MySQL database and the Founder of MySQL AB. Currently he is the CEO of Monty Program, a company founded by him. Monty Program is a center of engineering excellence for a database server called MariaDB, the Aria storage engine, MySQL®, and other associated technologies.

Monty is also a partner in the venture capital company Open Ocean. Monty’s experience and knowledge is highly regarded, which has resulted in many board memberships. He is currently active in the board of IT Mill Ltd, Finsor, Web of Trust by Against Intuition Inc. and several others.

 

 

 

 

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Replication in MySQL Admin

by Daniel Schneller Udo Schwedt | January 2011 | Cookbooks MySQL

In this article, by Daniel Schneller & Udo Schwedt, author of MySQL Admin Cookbook, we will discuss:

  • Setting up automatically updated slaves of a server based on a SQL dump
  • Setting up automatically updated slaves of a selection of tables based on a SQL dump
  • Setting up automatically updated slaves using data file copy
  • Sharing read load across multiple machines
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Granting Access in MySQL for Python

by Albert Lukaszewski, PhD | December 2010 | MySQL Open Source

One needs to tell MySQL what kind of privileges to assign to it. MySQL supports a wide range of privileges. A user can only grant any privilege that they have themselves.

In this article, by Albert Lukaszewski, PhD, author of MySQL for Python, we will cover:

  • Granting access in Python
  • Removing privileges in MySQL
  • Using REVOKE in Python
  • Project: Web-based user administration
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Getting Up and Running with MySQL for Python

by Albert Lukaszewski, PhD | December 2010 | MySQL Open Source

There are, several ways to get MySQL for Python in a place such that your local Python installation can use it. Which one you use will depend as much on your familiarity with your operating system and with Python itself, as it will on which operating system and version of Python you are running.

In this article, by Albert Lukaszewski, PhD, author of MySQL for Python, we will cover the following:

  • Where you can get MySQL for Python
  • Installing MySQL for Python
  • Importing the module into your programs
  • Accessing online help about the MySQL for Python API and its accompanying modules
  • How to connect to a database
  • How to create a MySQL cursor proxy within your Python program
  • How to close the database connection from Python
  • How to access multiple databases within one program
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Tips & Tricks on MySQL for Python

by Albert Lukaszewski, PhD | December 2010 | MySQL Open Source

Python is a dynamic programming language, which is completely enterprise ready, owing largely to the variety of support modules that are available to extend its capabilities. In order to build productive and feature-rich Python applications, we need to use MySQL for Python, a module that provides database support to our applications.

In this article, we will have a look at the tips and tricks presented thru-ought on MySQL for Python.

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