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Extending OpenCms: Developing a Custom Widget

by Dan Liliedahl | January 2009 | Content Management Java Open Source

There are a variety of user interface widgets available in OpenCms. The default widgets cover most user interface needs. But sometimes, a data field may need to be populated in some other way. OpenCms allows for custom widgets to be created and plugged into its architecture. In this article by Dan Liliedahl, we will design and create our own widget to illustrate this.

Read Extending OpenCms: Developing a Custom Widget in full

User Input Validation in Tapestry 5

by Alexander Kolesnikov | January 2009 | Content Management Java Open Source

One of the benefits of having a web application is that it can be very easily accessed by everyone around the world. One of the downsides of this is that when so many people use your application, they are going to have errors in their input. Some people are not attentive, others are tired and, finally, everyone in this world has his or her individual style of thinking, so something that seems obvious to the developers of the application might puzzle someone else.

A well-designed web application should immediately be able to define that the input is wrong and stop—otherwise all kinds of errors can happen inside of the application. If this application is user-friendly, it should:

  • Clearly and unambiguously inform the user that some part of the input is erroneous, and should be corrected.
  • Identify the field that is erroneous and mark it in some way.
  • If possible, display the erroneous value, and maybe even explain why exactly it is wrong.

In this article by Alexander Kolesnikov, we will see how Tapestry 5, being a highly efficient and user-friendly framework, handles these issues. For the purpose of this article we will use a Tapestry web application named Celebrity Collector.

Read User Input Validation in Tapestry 5 in full

Network Configuration—IPv6 with FreeBSD

by Babak Farrokhi | January 2009 | Open Source

Today, everyone knows that the internet is running out of IP addresses. In fact, the current infrastructure of the internet is running over legacy IP (aka IPv4) protocol that was not designed for such wide-spread and complicated use (for example, IPv4 was not designed to run in a refrigerator).

The original design of Internet Protocol (IPv4) is not efficient for today's networks. And even worse, we are running out of IPv4 addresses in a few years!

FreeBSD uses the IPv6 code from the KAME project. The KAME project (see www.kame.net) has been inactive since 2005, and FreeBSD developers have eversince maintained the IPv6 protocol stack.

In this article by Babak Farrokhi, we will look into the following:

  • IPv6 facts
  • Using IPv6
  • Routing IPv6
  • RIP6
  • Multicast routing
  • Tunnelling
Read Network Configuration—IPv6 with FreeBSD in full

Creating an Administration Interface in Django

by Ayman Hourieh | January 2009 | Content Management Open Source

We need an administration interface to manage the content that users post to our website. In fact, the administration interface is a universal feature needed in any web application that stores and manages data. For this reason, Django comes with a fully-fledged administration interface ready to be used. This administration interface is considered one of the coolest features in Django because it's easy to use, yet powerful and flexible.

In this article by Ayman Hourieh, you will learn about:

  • Activating the administration interface
  • Using the administration interface to manage content
  • Customizing the administration interface
  • Assigning permissions to users and groups
Read Creating an Administration Interface in Django in full

Extending the Application using Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009 (Part 2)

by David Roys Vjekoslav Babić | December 2008 | .NET Microsoft

The three-tiered architecture in Dynamics NAV 2009 enables wonderful things to happen. Yes, you can get better scalability by separating the business logic from the presentation layer, but there are a couple of other things you get as a result of the Dynamics NAV Service Tier: Web services enablement and Multiple Presentation Layers. The RoleTailored client is an example of a presentation layer. The user interfaces are lovely, without a doubt, but it's the Web services that have got people buzzing. Web services enablement opens up a whole new world for NAV implementations and in this article, we're going to look at some of the things we can now do.This is in continuation of the Previous Article on the same topic.

In this article by David Roys and Vjekoslav Babic you'll learn what you can do with Web services.

Read Extending the Application using Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009 (Part 2) in full
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