Joomla! Accessibility


Joomla! Accessibility
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Overview
Table of Contents
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Sample Chapters

 

  • Understand what accessibility really means and why it’s important
  • Ensure that content editors and writers publish accessible articles
  • Create accessible Joomla! Templates
  • Understand Assistive Technology (AT) and the needs of people with disabilities

 

Book Details

Language : English
Paperback : 156 pages [ 235mm x 191mm ]
Release Date : October 2007
ISBN : 1847194087
ISBN 13 : 9781847194084
Author(s) : Joshue O Connor
Topics and Technologies : All Books, CMS and eCommerce, Content Management (CMS), Joomla!, Open Source


Table of Contents

Preface
Chapter 1: Why be Accessible?
Chapter 2: Understanding Accessibility
Chapter 3: Understanding Disability and Assistive Technology (AT)
Chapter 4: Creating Accessible Content
Chapter 5: Creating Accessible Templates
Chapter 6: Using XStandard to Create Accessible Content
Index
  • Chapter 1: Why be Accessible?
    • Defining Accessibility
      • Understanding Your Users
      • Dealing with Change
      • Think Different
    • What Are the Benefits of Accessibility?
    • Accessibility Legislation
      • Irish Legislation
        • Accessible Procurement
    • Laws and Public Policies in Other Countries
      • UK Legislation
      • The US and Section 508/504
        • So What's the Big Deal with 508?
      • The European Union (EU) and e-Accessibility
        • eEurope Action Plan
        • e-Inclusion Policy
        • European Policy and the Future
    • So What Does It All Mean to You?
    • Summary
  • Chapter 2: Understanding Accessibility
    • What Will Joomla! Not Do?
    • Usability
      • User Testing
      • Using Personas
        • Building Personas
    • Understanding Accessibility
      • Being Accessible Doesn't Hurt
    • WCAG 1.0
      • Differences Between WCAG 1.0 and WCAG 2.0
        • Principle 1—Content Must be Perceivable (P)
        • Principle 2—Interface Elements must be Operable (O)
        • Principle 3—Content and Controls must be Understandable (U)
        • Principle 4—Content Should be Robust Enough to Work with Current and Future Technologies (R)
      • Understanding WCAG
    • Summary
  • Chapter 3: Understanding Disability and Assistive Technology (AT)
    • Blindness
    • Visual Impairment
      • Glaucoma
      • Macular Degeneration
      • Retinopathy
      • Detached Retina
    • Physical Disabilities
    • Cognitive Disabilities
    • Assistive Technology (AT)
      • What is a Screen Reader?
      • Screen Magnification
      • Switch Access
      • How Do Switches Work?
      • Mouse Emulation
    • Useful Tools for Developers
      • Web Accessibility Tools Consortium (WAT-C)
      • Mozilla Web Developer Toolbar
    • Sitting Comfortably? Then we'll Begin
      • Exercise 1—"No Frills" Browsing
        • If You are Using Firefox
        • Internet Explorer
    • Mouse Free Zone
      • The Acid Test
      • Finally—Was It Good for You?
      • Try it yourself
      • Exercise 2—Turn Off Your Display
    • Summary
  • Chapter 4: Creating Accessible Content
    • Describe What it is, Not How it Looks
      • All the (X)HTML You Need in Two Minutes
    • Using Headings to Communicate Structure
      • Time For Action—Let's Add Some Content
      • What Just Happened?
      • Time for Action—Adding Headings with WYSIWYG
      • What Just Happened?
      • Time for Action—Adding Headings by Editing the HTML
    • Add Frequent Headings to Assist the Screen Reader
    • How to Use Different Levels of Headings
  • Another Important Element
    • Lists
    • Time for Action—Adding Lists
    • What Just Happened?
  • Make Images Accessible
    • Description Anxiety
    • Time for Action—Adding Alternate Text to an Image
    • Choosing Good Alternate Text for Images
    • What is Good Alternate Text?
      • Ignoring Purely Decorative Images
      • Charts, Graphs, and Infographics
      • Describing Photographs
    • Time for action—Using longdesc
  • Good Link Text Assists Accessibility
  • Creating Accessible Tables
    • The Trouble with Tables
    • Time for Action—Create an Accessible Table (Part 1)
    • Time for Action—Create an Accessible Table (Part 2)
    • Time for Action—Create an Accessible Table (Part 3)
    • Does Joomla! Have Good Table Manners?
  • Summary
  • Chapter 5: Creating Accessible Templates
    • Understanding How Joomla! Templates Work
      • Separation Anxiety—Layout Tables, HTML, and CSS
        • Joomla! 1.0 Used Tables for Layout, So What's the Problem?
        • Why Are Tables Bad for Layout?
    • Building a Standards-Compliant Joomla! Template from Scratch
      • What Modules Do I Need?
      • Color scheme
        • Ensure Good Color Contrast for Your Site
      • Icons and Graphics
      • Create a Mock Up If Possible
        • Roll Your Own Accessible Joomla! Template
      • Using Dreamweaver
        • Set Up FTP Server Connection to Your Local Host
        • Create a Template for Your Template
        • A Few More Steps, Before We Get Going with Coding Our New Template
        • Selecting Your Template
        • Choosing the Correct DOCTYPE
      • XHTML Rules
      • Just One More Thing
        • Putting It All Together
      • Basic Template Layout
        • CSS Scaffolding
        • My CSS Layout
        • Just Before We Add Any Content Modules
      • Adding Content Modules
      • Module Options
      • Finishing the Template
    • Advantages of Joomla! Templates
    • Editing Joomla! Templates
      • Resizable Text
      • How to Make Sure That Text Will Resize
    • Without a Mouse
    • Highlighting Links
    • Some Basic Link Styles
    • Skip Navigation
    • Accessible Templates
    • Summary
  • Chapter 6: Using XStandard to Create Accessible Content
    • Choosing Your Editor
    • The XStandard Interface
      • Styles Menu
      • Tool buttons
      • View modes
        • Browser Preview
        • Screen Reader Preview
        • Help
        • Context Menu
    • Removing The "Noise" From Markup
      • Using Correct Markup
        • Relative Values
    • Decorative Versus Non-decorative Images
    • Data Tables
      • Create a Table
      • Edit Tables Using the Table Properties Dialog Box
      • Edit Tables Using the Context Menu
        • Abbreviations
        • Screen Reader Preview
      • What is Screen Reader Preview?
        • Using the Screen Reader Preview
        • Interface Accessibility
      • Keyboard Shortcuts
    • Summary

Joshue O Connor

Joshue O Connor is Senior Accessibility Consultant with CFIT (Centre For Inclusive Technology).

CFIT is a part of the NCBI (National Council For The Blind of Ireland) and is a not-for-profit organization that provides expert advice and services to public and private sector organizations. These services include user testing, accessibility auditing and consultancy.

Joshue has a creative background in Graphic Design, which lead to Web Development and New Media Training. After several years in the shark infested waters of the private sector, through IT training, he got to work teaching people with a wide range of physical and cognitive disabilities.

This was an invaluable hands-on experience that brought him into contact with a diverse range of Assistive Technology users, who found technology a positive and enabling force in their lives. A natural gravitation towards Web Accessibility thus blossomed.

Joshue is skilled in the design and development of accessible websites and has a deep understanding of the diversity of user requirements. He is a member of the Guild of Accessible Web Designers (GAWDS), the Web Standards Project ILG (WaSP ILG), the Irish Design For All E-Accessibility Network (Irl-Dean), the IIA User Experience Working Group (UEWG), EUAIN, and the HTML 5 Working Group. This is his first book, contributions to obscure academic papers notwithstanding.

In his spare time he hangs out with his plants, studies computer science, plays Irish traditional music badly, and runs a small record label TechRecord.




Contact Joshue O Connor

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Please let us know if you have found any errors not listed on this list by completing our errata submission form. Our editors will check them and add them to this list. Thank you.


Errata

- 6 submitted: last submission 09 Jan 2012

Errata type: typo | Page number: 2

The first paragraph under "Who is this book for" heading says: "You don't need to know anything about accessibility -- the author tells you all that you need to know to make your Joomla! sites compliant with accessibility standards". It should read: "You don't need to know anything about accessibility -- the author tells you all that you need to know to start building more accessible websites".

 

Errata type: typo | Page number: 9

Under the heading, "Accessibility Legislation" , the line-We will now look in detail at the current state of legislation in the Ireland, after..... should read We will now look in detail at the current state of legislation in Ireland, after..

 

Errata type: typo | Page number: 20

The first paragraph says: "A good rule of thumb in user interface design is to provide instructions on how to perform particular tasks".It should read: "A good rule of thumb in user interface design is that if you need to provide instructions on how to perform each task, it's already too complicated".

 

Errata type: typo | Page number: 26

The last paragraph says: "What I hope to do is provide you with a step-by-step way of creating a WCAG compliant website using Joomla! I will focus in the rest of the book on what I feel are some of the main areas that you should give your attention to."It should say: "Insted of providing you with a step-by-step way of creating a WCAG compliant website using Joomla!, I hope to focus in the rest of the book on what I feel are some of the main areas that you should give your attention to."

 

Errata type: typo | Page number: 27

The first paragraph says: "... share a few disabilities types and how users with these disabilities could use technology." It should say: "... share what I know about a few types of disability and how users with these disabilities could use technology."

 

Errata type: typo | Page number: 66

The 1st para in "What just happened" says: "Above, two methods of providing an alternative description of an image are described." It should say: "Above, a method for providing an alternative description of an image was described."

 

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What you will learn from this book

 

  • Get under the hood with Joomla! and learn how to modify Joomla! HTML output in order to make more accessible websites.
  • Understand how to use WYSIWYG editors like TinyMCE and XStandard to create accessible content.
  • Create accessible Joomla! templates.
  • Understand some of the most popular assistive technologies (AT) and how they work.
  • Gain a deeper understanding of some different disabilities.
  • Get an overview of the legal requirement to be accessible.
  • Gain some very practical guidance based on the authors’ years of practical experience working as a web developer and with people with disabilities.


Chapter 1
looks at the legal situation around the world and other drivers that put accessibility on the web developers’ map. This chapter also looks at some definitions of accessibility and introduces the concepts of usability and universality. The chapter explores the need to understand your users, accommodate diversity, and dealing with change as well as some of the benefits of accessibility.

Chapter 2 considers how both accessibility and usability make up a powerful combination for a holistic approach to web development and a positive user experience for everyone. The chapter looks at other practical ways of determining whether your sites are not only accessible but also usable, such as user testing. The chapter also looks at the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG).

Chapter 3 looks at various types of disability as well as the variety of assistive technology that is available. You will also learn how to modify your browsing experience in order to try to gain a greater understanding of what it is like for people with disabilities when they go online.
 
Chapter 4 looks at using headings and other HTML elements to provide content structure. How this benefits users of assistive technology and other SEO (Search Engine Optimization) benefits. This chapter examines how to provide simple text alternatives to images and using descriptive link text to assist accessibility, as well as creating accessible tables and how to edit the HTML by hand.

Chapter 5 examines the importance of preparation while designing your template and the advantages of using accessible templates. The chapter also explains the importance of good color contrast and making your text resizable for visually impaired users as well as the making your interface keyboard accessible.

Chapter 6 looks at getting the most out of XStandard, while throughout most of the book TinyMCE was used.

In Detail

Understanding how to create accessible websites is an essential skill these days . You may even be obliged by law to create websites that are usable by the widest audience, including people with a range of disabilities.

This book looks at what accessibility is and the various reasons, such as legislative or legal, as to why you really need to understand accessibility and then create websites that can be used by everyone.

This book therefore examines the diverse range of user requirements that need to be considered for humans to successfully use web technologies.

If you have no experience of being around, or working with, people with disabilities then it can be very difficult to successfully design user interfaces that cover their needs. This book will show you how you can both understand some of the various needs of people with disabilities and the technology they use to interact with computers and the Web.

This book provides a short, practical guide to ensure that your Joomla! web site is accessible and usable by the widest audience.

Approach

This is a practical book that contains many step-by-step examples for the reader to get their teeth into. Primarily, the book is designed to help the reader gain a deeper understanding of Joomla! and accessibility, but it can also be read as an introduction to assistive technology, disability, and the diversity of user requirements.

The book also attempts to de-mystify accessibility and take it off the theoretical platform and firmly root it in the real world with tangible benefits for users of Joomla!.

Who this book is for

This book is a guide to any Joomla! user who wants to make their sites more accessible and the author does assume that you have a basic working knowledge of Joomla!. You don’t need to know anything about accessibility -- the author tells you all that you need to know to make your Joomla! sites accessible to the widest audience.

While some design skills and technical knowledge of HTML, CSS and PHP will be very useful you will still benefit from reading this book if you wish to understand more about assistive technology and the needs of people with disabilities. The book is distilled from years of hands on experience that the author has as a web developer and also working with people with disabilities.

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