Article Network

Cocos2d for iPhone: Handling Accelerometer Input and Detecting Collisions

by Pablo Ruiz | December 2010 | Open Source

Cocos2d for iPhone is a framework for building 2D games, applications, presentations, demos, and more. It was originally made for Python and then ported to IPhone by Ricardo Quesada as an open source project with the MIT license.

In the previous article by Pablo Ruiz, author of the book Cocos2d for iPhone 0.99 Beginner's Guide, we saw how to create new scenes and move through them, and build the base for an action game.

In this article, we will see how to handle accelerometer input and detect collisions.

Read Cocos2d for iPhone: Handling Accelerometer Input and Detecting Collisions in full

Cocos2d for iPhone: Adding Layers and Making a Simple Pause Screen

by Pablo Ruiz | December 2010 | Open Source

Cocos2d for iPhone is a framework for building 2D games, applications, presentations, demos, and more. It was originally made for Python and then ported to IPhone by Ricardo Quesada as an open source project with the MIT license.

In the previous articles by Pablo Ruiz, author of the book Cocos2d for iPhone 0.99 Beginner's Guide, we saw how to create new scenes and move through them, and build the base for an action game and how to handle accelerometer input and detect collisions.

In this article, we will see how to add more layers to your scenes and make a simple pause screen.

Read Cocos2d for iPhone: Adding Layers and Making a Simple Pause Screen in full

Cocoa and Objective-C: Handling Events

by Jeff Hawkins | June 2011 | Cookbooks

The trackpad is becoming more popular as an input device as all new Apple laptops now have a trackpad. Even desktop Macs have trackpad support with the addition of the Magic Trackpad. Adding gestures to your Cocoa application to support the trackpad is not difficult. The recipes in this article by Jeff Hawkins, author of Cocoa and Objective-C Cookbook, will show you how to add the three most popular gestures to your application. Specifically we will cover:

  • Interpreting the pinch gesture
  • Interpreting the swipe gesture
  • Interpreting the rotate gesture
  • Handling special keys
  • Working with NSResponder
  • Application-wide notifications with NotificationCenter
Read Cocoa and Objective-C: Handling Events in full

Cocoa and Objective-C: Animating CALayers

by Jeff Hawkins | May 2011 | Cookbooks

Layers are a very powerful way to draw or animate your views. Using layer-backed views is similar to using layers in a graphics application like Adobe's Photoshop. Layers can be stacked and animated to create powerful effects.

In this article by Jeff Hawkins, author of Cocoa and Objective-C Cookbook, we will cover:

  • Understanding the CALayer class
  • Animation by changing properties
  • Using animation to swap views
  • Using the flip animation
  • Using a CAAnimationGroup
  • Using Keyframe animations
  • Using CAMediaTiming in animations
Read Cocoa and Objective-C: Animating CALayers in full

CMS Made Simple: Application of User-Defined Tags

by Samuel Goldstein | May 2011 | Content Management Open Source

This article will help us explore a few applications of tags. Most of these recipes are User-Defined Tags, because the capabilities of the User-Defined Tags are nearly identical to the file type of a tag.

In this article by Samuel Goldstein, author of CMS Made Simple Development Cookbook, we will cover:

  • Displaying the User's IP address from a User-Defined Tag
  • Using the current content object in a User-Defined Tag
  • Making a variable available to Smarty from a User-Defined Tag
  • Displaying the number of pages in the CMS using a User-Defined Tag
  • Using URL parameters in a User-Defined Tag
  • Using Smarty values as inputs in a User-Defined Tag

 

Read CMS Made Simple: Application of User-Defined Tags in full

CMS Made Simple 1.6: Orders and Payments in an E-commerce Website

by Sofia Hauschildt | March 2010 | Beginner's Guides Content Management Open Source Web Development

In the article CMS Made Simple 1.6: Getting Started with an E-commerce Website, we covered Products module. In this article by Sofia Hauschildt, author of CMS Made Simple 1.6: Beginner's Guide, we will learn about a solution made of following modules:

  • Cart
  • SelfRegistration (optional)
  • Orders
  • PaypalGateway (optional)
Read CMS Made Simple 1.6: Orders and Payments in an E-commerce Website in full

CMS Made Simple 1.6: Learning Smarty Basics

by Sofia Hauschildt | March 2010 | Beginner's Guides Content Management Open Source Web Development

In this article by Sofia Hauschildt, author of CMS Made Simple 1.6: Beginner's Guide, you will learn the basics of Smarty. Creating professional sophisticated designs is easier using Smarty. With the powerful combination of Smarty and HTML, there are no limits to the flexibility of the sites you design.

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CMS Made Simple 1.6: Getting Started with an E-commerce Website

by Sofia Hauschildt | March 2010 | Beginner's Guides Content Management Open Source Web Development

This article by Sofia Hauschildt, author of CMS Made Simple 1.6: Beginner's Guide, covers the Products module which will be the heart of your e-commerce solution. This module is the place where products that you would like to sell in your shop are saved. Generally, it is possible to use any other module for the solution, but this would imply that you have to make some heavy modifications to your templates and, probably, the PHP code of the modules.

Read CMS Made Simple 1.6: Getting Started with an E-commerce Website in full

Clusters, Parallel Computing, and Raspberry Pi – A Brief Background

by Andrew K. Dennis | November 2013 | Open Source

In this article by Andrew Dennis, author of the book Raspberry Pi Super Cluster, the basics of clusters and parallel computing have been explained. The domain of parallel computing is an interesting one, but building a cluster for fun has often required the use of expensive or bulky off-the-shelf hardware, such as desktop PC's or implementing complex virtual machine setups.

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Cloudera Hadoop and HP Vertica

by Davide Moraschi | October 2013 | Enterprise Articles

In this article by Davide Moraschi, author of Business Intelligence with MicroStrategy Cookbook, explains how to connect from MicroStrategy to one of the most commonly used platforms for Big Data. The distribution used is CH4 with Impala and also demonstrates the connection to a common platform for columnar databases, the Vertica engine by HP. The distribution used is the Community Edition, freely available from the vendor site.

Read Cloudera Hadoop and HP Vertica in full

Cloud-enabling Your Apps

by Darren Cope | May 2013 | Beginner's Guides

This article by Darren Cope, author of Appcelerator Titanium Application Development by Example Beginner's Guide will show how to integrate with the cloud and will concentrate on how to use some of the storage-based solutions. Specifically you will learn how to:

  • Integrate with Appcelerator Cloud Services
  • Interface to a REST-based cloud service
  • Send and receive data from the cloud
Read Cloud-enabling Your Apps in full

Cloning and Snapshots in VMware Workstation

by Sander van Vugt | August 2013 | Enterprise Articles

In this article by Sander van Vugt, author of VMware Workstation – No Experience Necessary, you'll learn to work with cloning and snapshot tools. In a test environment, it is often necessary to deploy virtual machines rapidly and to revert to a previous state in an easy way. VMware Workstation provides all the tools that are required for this purpose. In this article, you'll learn to work with cloning and snapshot tools that enable you to perform these tasks.

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Clojure for Domain-specific Languages - Design Concepts with Clojure

by Ryan D. Kelker | December 2013 | Open Source

In this article, by Ryan D. Kelker, author of the book Clojure for Domain-specific Languages, we will go over some basic concepts that apply to software development in any programming language. Each section will explain what the concept is and why the concept should be applied to your projects. As with all sources of information, choose whichever works for you.

This article will cover:

  • Pure functions
  • General programming concepts
  • Clojure writing styles

By the end of this article, you should be able to articulate the concepts of DRY, KISS, YAGNI, and bottom-up development. In addition to this, you should have a better understanding of how to write nicer Clojure as the anti-patterns section displays many examples of both what to do, and what not to do.

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Client-Side Endpoint Protection Tasks in Microsoft System Centre 2012 Endpoint Protection Cookbook

by Andrew Plue | October 2012 | Enterprise Articles Microsoft

In this article by Andrew Plue, author of Microsoft System Center 2012 Endpoint Protection Cookbook, we will cover:

  • Locating and interrupting client-side SCEP logs
  • Performing manual definition updates and checking definition version
  • Manually editing local SCEP policy using the user interface
  • Utilizing MpCmdRun.exe

 

Read Client-Side Endpoint Protection Tasks in Microsoft System Centre 2012 Endpoint Protection Cookbook in full

Client-Side Endpoint Protection Tasks in Microsoft SCEP 2012

by Andrew Plue | October 2012 | Enterprise Articles Microsoft

In this article by Andrew Plue, author of Microsoft System Center 2012 Endpoint Protection Cookbook, we will cover:

  • Locating and interrupting client-side SCEP logs
  • Performing manual definition updates and checking definition version
  • Manually editing local SCEP policy using the user interface
  • Utilizing MpCmdRun.exe

 

Read Client-Side Endpoint Protection Tasks in Microsoft SCEP 2012 in full

Classification and Regression Trees

by Prabhanjan Narayanachar Tattar | August 2013 | Beginner's Guides Open Source

The article, Regression Trees by Prabhanjan Narayanachar Tattar, from the book Instant MongoDB, gives a tree-based regression model. This article also shows you how to build them using R functions. Of course, the recursive partitioning techniques, in most cases, may be viewed as non-linear models.

We will first introduce the notion of recursive partitions through a hypothetical dataset. It is apparent that the earlier approach of the linear models changes in an entirely different way with the functioning of the recursive partitions. Recursive partitioning depends upon the type of problem we have in hand. We develop a regression tree for the regression problem when the output is a continuous variable, as in the linear models. If the output is a binary variable, we develop a classification tree. A regression tree is first created by using the rpart function from the rpart package. A very raw R program is created, which clearly explains the unfolding of a regression tree. A similar effort is repeated for the classification tree. In the final section of this article, a classification tree is created for the German credit data problem along with the use of ROC curves for understanding the model performance. The approach in this article will be on the following lines:

  • Understanding the basis of recursive partitions and the general CART.
  • Construction of a regression tree
  • Construction of a classification tree
  • Application of a classification tree to the German credit data problem
  • The finer aspects of CART
Read Classification and Regression Trees in full

Class-less Objects in JavaScript

by Stoyan Stefanov | October 2008 | AJAX Web Development

Java and JavaScript are very different languages, although the similarity in the names and the similar C-like syntax can confuse people sometimes. In this article by Stoyan Stefanov, let's take a look at one pretty major difference - how objects are created. In Java, you have classes. Then objects, a.k.a. instances, are created based on those classes. In JavaScript, there are no classes and objects are more like hash tables of key-value pairs. Then what about inheritance? OK, one step at a time.

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Citrix XenApp Performance Essentials

by Luca Dentella | August 2013 | Enterprise Articles

In this article by Luca Dentella, author of Citrix XenApp Performance Essentials we will see how optimizing session Startup, helps XenApp administrators reduce the session start-up time. Citrix XenApp (formerly Citrix WinFrame Server, Citrix MetaFrame Server, and Citrix Presentation Server) is an application virtualization product that allows users to connect to their corporate applications from a wide range of computer systems and mobile devices. XenApp can host applications on central servers and allow users to interact with them remotely or stream and deliver them to user devices for local execution.

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CISSP: Vulnerability and Penetration Testing for Access Control

by M. L. Srinivasan | November 2009 | Networking & Telephony

This article by M.L.Srinivasan, covers concepts related to vulnerability assessment and penetration testing.

In this article, we'll focus on IT vulnerabilities, the impact due to compromise, and the overall cycle of vulnerability and penetration tests. We'll also discuss some of the emerging standards in terms of vulnerability naming systems such as Common Vulnerabilities and Exposures (CVE), which is a dictionary for vulnerability names; and Common Vulnerability Scoring System (CVSS), as defined by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST).

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CISSP: Security Measures for Access Control

by M. L. Srinivasan | November 2009 | Networking & Telephony

This article by M.L.Srinivasan, covers concepts related to access control, methodologies and techniques, authentication, and access-related attacks and countermeasures.

Access control, as the name implies, is the domain that deals with controlling access to information and the associated information system assets such as computers, networks, data center, etc. As with the overall objective of information security, access control is to preserve the CIA of information assets by way of administrative, technical (logical), and physical controls.

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