Article Network

Collision Detection and Physics in Panda3D Game Development

by Christoph Lang | March 2011 | Cookbooks Open Source Web Graphics & Video

Panda3D is a free and open source game engine. It has been used successfully by hobbyists as well as big studios to create games ranging from quick prototypes to full-scale commercial MMOs. Panda3D makes it easy to use models, textures, and sounds to create impressive interactive experiences. With this article, you too will be able to leverage the full power of the Panda3D engine.

In this article by Christoph Lang, author of Panda3D game developer’s cookbook, we will cover:

  • Using the built-in collision detection system
  • Using the built-in physics system
  • Using the ODE physics engine
  • Using the PhysX physics engine
  • Integrating the Bullet physics engine
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Collaborative Work with SVN and Git

by Thomas Deuling | March 2013 | Beginner's Guides Open Source

Collaborative work is an important topic at present. Many large projects are now being developed in a collaborative way. But this was not always easy for the developer. When many developers are working together on large projects, each developer must have a well-known area of work, and each developer must make sure that he doesn't interfere with the work of the other developers.

Without tools such as SVN or Git, large projects like jQuery or Linux Mint could not be possible. The developers of all these projects are distributed all over the world and they often work in different time zones and have different ways of working, but in the end all the parts are merged into one great project in SVN or Git.

So, SVN and Git are a great enrichment for all developers and essential for the fast progress of large web projects.

In this article by Thomas Deuling the author of Aptana Studio Beginner's Guide, we will take a look at how easy it is to work with SVN and Git in Aptana Studio.

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Collaboration Features in Alfresco Share

by Amita Bhandari Pallika Majmudar Vinita Choudhary | March 2012 | Content Management Open Source

Alfresco Share offers a number of such features out-of-the-box. These are features that ensure effective task management. These are completely customizable if need be. The numerous technologies and tools that Alfresco supports ensures that no, or minimal, change be made to the enterprise's existing infrastructure.

Enterprises have a number of tasks that require its people to be able to effectively manage their tasks and schedules. For the purpose of managing intra- and inter-team events, a variety of collaboration tools like calendars, forums, and so on are available. More often than not, there are tools independent of each other, or they may not be compatible with existing systems that are in place.

In this article by Pallika Majmudar, co-author of Alfresco Share, we shall understand the various collaborative features like wiki, blogs, data lists, calendar, discussions, and lists features that Share has on offer.

By the end of this article, you will have learned about:

 

  • Wiki pages and blogs in Share
  • Managing data lists
  • Creating events in Alfresco Share
  • Effective collaboration through discussions
  • Managing and creating data lists

 

 

 

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ColdFusion AJAX Programming

by John Farrar | April 2009 | AJAX Web Development

This article deals with AJAX programming in ColdFusion. ColdFusion acts a great platform not just because of its code features, but because of its characteristics as to how the code interacts with other features. ColdFusion is a language with depth and power. Yet, as we developers know, it seems real power always requires a bit of custom code. In this article by John Farrar, we will have a look at the following topics:

  • Binding
  • Proxy connections
  • JSON features
  • Spry data integration
  • Debugging
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ColdFusion 9: Power CFCs and Web Forms

by John Farrar | August 2010 | Web Development

In this article by John Farrar, author of ColdFusion 9 Developer Tutorial, we will learn to move forward from making our code work to making it interesting to write and reuse. We could call this a "power CFC". Power is doing away with the old practice of copying and pasting code again and again with some minor edits in the pasted code. Here, we will learn to reuse the CFC code to make it much simpler. CFCs are the object-packaging method used in ColdFusion. Database interaction is quite universally wrapped in CFCs. We will look at database interaction as our primary example of power CFCs in the context of working with "web forms". If you are new to development, then these concepts will make it easy for you. Here is an overview of what this article contains:

  • The practice of protecting access to CFC methods
  • The working of web forms
  • Managing multiple products through common forms for listing, editing, and adding data
  • Improving the page flow, also known as work flow
  • Returning messages to the user to know things are working
  • Learning the power of inheritance
  • Simplifying by passing array collections, rather than manual line-by-line passing of the variable values
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ColdFusion 8-Enhancements You May Have Missed

by Charlie Griefer | June 2008 | AJAX Web Development

ColdFusion 8 is arguably one of the most significant releases of the product since ColdFusion MX (6.0) first graced our servers in 2002. The release brings with it long awaited image manipulation tags and functions. Built-in AJAX integration makes it easier to create "Web 2.0" applications. Compared to previous releases, it's also wicked fast. Given the significance of these new features, it may be easy to overlook some of the enhancements that have found their way into ColdFusion 8. In this article by Charlie Griefer, we will look into the some of the enhancements to existing features and functionality that you may have missed.

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Coding with Minecraft

by Daniel Bates | September 2013 | Open Source

This article by Daniel Bates, author of Instant Minecraft: Pi Edition Coding How-to, will guide you through to the point where you have Python code interacting with Minecraft: Pi Edition. We will walk through the steps required to connect to the game and post a chat message. Many more features are available once connected, some of which are covered at the end of this article.

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Coding for the Real-time Web

by Andy Meadows | July 2013 | .NET Enterprise Articles

The article by Andy Meadows, the author of ASP.NET MVC 4 Mobile App Development, talks about how we can use always-on connectivity to provide the illusion of a desktop application within BrewHow. He then talks about imposing SignalR to simulate push notifications from the server to BrewHow.

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CodeIgniter MVC – The Power of Simplicity!

by Eli Orr Yehuda Zadik | November 2013 | PHP Web Development

In this article by Eli Orr and Yehuda Zadik, the authors of the book Programming with CodeIgniter MVC, the authors would like to share with you initially, his personal wisdom based on many years of experience with various technologies, where CI fits well to my wisdom conclusion. In the last 30 years I was deeply in many software development projects in the rule of a lead developer, system architect, and product manager. One common conclusion I have found, is:

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CodeIgniter Email and HTML Table

by Rob Foster | November 2013 | Open Source

CodeIgniter comes with some useful libraries and functions for handling many aspects of application development. In this article by Rob Foster, author of CodeIgniter 2 Cookbook, you will look at Email and HTML tables. The CodeIgniter Email library is capable of sending plain text and HTML e-mails, with and without attachments that can be used (with a little configuration) instead of the standard PHP mail() function.

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CodeIgniter Email and HTML Table

by Rob Foster | November 2013 | Open Source

CodeIgniter comes with some useful libraries and functions for handling many aspects of application development. In this article by Rob Foster, author of CodeIgniter 2 Cookbook, you will look at Email and HTML tables. The CodeIgniter Email library is capable of sending plain text and HTML e-mails, with and without attachments that can be used (with a little configuration) instead of the standard PHP mail() function.

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CodeIgniter and Objects

by David Upton | December 2007 | MySQL Open Source PHP

Objects confused me when I started to use CodeIgniter. I came to CodeIgniter via PHP 4, which is a procedural language, not really an Object-Oriented (OO) language. I duly looked up objects and methods, properties and inheritance, and encapsulation, but my early attempts to write CI code were plagued by the error message "Call to a member function on a non-object". I saw it so often that I was thinking of having it printed on a t-shirt: it has a mysteriously libertarian, anarchist tone, and I could see myself wearing it at a modern art exhibition.

This is the geek article. It describes the way CodeIgniter actually works, 'under the hood'. If you are new to CI, you may want to skip it. However, sooner or later, you may want to understand why things happen in certain ways—as opposed to just knowing that they do.

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CodeIgniter 1.7 and Objects

by David Upton | November 2009 | MySQL PHP Web Development

In this article by Jose Argudo Blanco and David Upton, we will see how CodeIgniter actually works, "under the hood". This article introduces a bit on object-oriented programming and how CodeIgniter makes use of it, including the use of the CI super object, and how we can modify and use. Here, we will also understand why things happen in certain ways, as opposed to just knowing that they do.

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Code interlude – signals and slots

by Ray Rischpater | November 2013 | Open Source

This article is by Ray Rischpater, author of the book Application Development with Qt Creator. In software systems, there is often the need to couple different objects. Ideally, this coupling should be loose, that is, not dependent on the system's compile-time configuration. This is especially obvious when you consider user interfaces; for example, a button press may adjust the contents of a text widget or cause something to appear or disappear. Many systems use events for this purpose; components offering data encapsulate that data in an event, and an event loop (or, more recently, an event listener) catches the event and performs some action.

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Code Editing

by Dan Peleg | December 2013 | Open Source

In this Article by Dan Peleg, the author of the book Mastering Sublime Text, explains Sublime's basic features to the most advanced features and techniques that need to be used while editing code.

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Code Analysis and Debugging Tools in Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009

by David A. Studebaker | September 2010 | Enterprise Articles Microsoft

In the previous article, Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009 Development Tools, we gained an overall view of NAV as an application software system.

The goal of this article by David Studebaker, author of Programming Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009, is to learn about many of the debugging tools and techniques available to the NAV developer. As it has been pointed out, "Without programmers, there are no bugs." As we are all developers and therefore a primary source of bugs, we need to be knowledgeable about the tools we can use to stamp out those bugs. Fortunately, NAV has a good arsenal of such tools.

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Cocos2d: Working with Sprites

by Nathan Burba | December 2011 | Open Source

Cocos2d is first and foremost a rich graphical API which allows a game developer easy access to a broad range of functionality. In this article, we will take a look at the basic uses of sprites.

In this article by Nathan Burba, author of Cocos2d for iPhone 1 Game Development Cookbook, we will cover the following topics:

  • Drawing sprites
  • Coloring sprites
  • Animating sprites
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Cocos2d: Uses of Box2D Physics Engine

by Nathan Burba | December 2011 | Open Source

For years, physics engines have been used in video games to add a sense of realism to the action onscreen. In many games, physics plays a crucial role within the gameplay. Cocos2d comes bundled with two popular 2D physics engines: Box2D and Chipmunk. In this article, we will explain the most common uses of physics in games using Box2D as our engine of choice.

In this article by Nathan Burba, author of Cocos2d for iPhone 1 Game Development Cookbook, we will cover the following points:

  • Box2D setup and debug drawing
  • Creating collision response routines
  • Using different shapes
  • Dragging and collision filtering
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Cocos2d-x: Installation

by Roger Engelbert | September 2013 | Beginner's Guides Games Open Source

In this article by Roger Engelbert, the author of Cocos2d-x by Example Beginner's Guide, we will cover the following:

  • How to download and install Cocos2d-x templates
  • How to run your first application
  • What the basic template looks like and how to find your way around it
  • How to run the test samples that comes bundled with Cocos2d-x
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Cocos2d for iPhone: Surfing Through Scenes

by Pablo Ruiz | December 2010 | Open Source

Cocos2d for iPhone is a framework for building 2D games, applications, presentations, demos, and more. It was originally made for Python and then ported to IPhone by Ricardo Quesada as an open source project with the MIT license.

Scenes are an essential part of any Cocos2d game. In this article by Pablo Ruiz, author of the book Cocos2d for iPhone 0.99 Beginner's Guide, we will look into the creation of many scenes to hold the different menus a game can have. Once we have a couple of scenes set up, you will learn how to go from one to another and with some nice transitions.

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