Article Network

Installation and basic features of EnterpriseDB

by Jayaram Krishnaswamy | January 2009 | MySQL PHP

Postgres is the well known and most used Open Source OLTP database available today. EnterpriseDB sits atop Postgres and leverages it to provide enterprise capabilities to Postgres users. EnterpriseDB is available for Windows platform as well. It has most of the necessary features of an enterprise class such as advanced development, monitoring, migration and administrative tools with a stable environment. It also has plug-in capabilities for Oracle. In the present form EnterpriseDB claims cost effectiveness versus Oracle and better scalability than MySQL. It can easily integrate with most applications such as Java, Ajax, Ruby, Drupal etc. This article by Dr. Jayaram Krishnaswamy mainly describes the installation of EnterpriseDB and the basic features to get started on this important database product.

Read Installation and basic features of EnterpriseDB in full

Installation

by Ghislain Hachey | September 2013 | Networking & Telephony Open Source

Instant OpenNMS Starter by Ghislain Hachey, explains OpenNMS. OpenNMS is an enterprise grade network management application platform built using the Java programming language under the open source model and is freely available under the GNU General Public License Version 3. OpenNMS can perform all functions of network management defined in the ITU's Principles for telecommunications network management including fault management, configuration management, accounting (or administration), performance management, and security management, often abbreviated as FCAPS.

There are always various ways to install software and the OpenNMS website provides several good tutorials at http://www.opennms.org/wiki/Tutorial for various operating systems. The following steps provide a less detailed albeit, slightly more advanced, and secure deployment procedure.

Read Installation in full

Install GNOME-Shell on Ubuntu 9.10 "Karmic Koala"

by Christer Edwards | January 2010 | Linux Servers Open Source

This article by Christer Edwards outlines the steps required to install and run the latest previews of GNOME Shell, which will become GNOME 3.0. The final release isn't scheduled until later this year, but there are preview snapshots available for testing and feedback. Installation of GNOME Shell can be done alongside your normal installation, so you don't need to worry about it interfering with your "regular" desktop.

Read Install GNOME-Shell on Ubuntu 9.10 "Karmic Koala" in full

Insight into Hyper-V Storage

by Zahir Hussain Shah | May 2013 | Enterprise Articles

(For more resources related to this topic, see here.)

Understanding virtual storage

A virtual machine that simulates the same computing architecture as the physical machine holds the virtual storage for its operating system. This storage can be set up in many different ways, where a virtual machine can have the same or different sizes of storage at the same time. This virtual storage can be accessed by the guest operating system, and in the case of a file server or other content and application server based virtual workloads, it can also be made available to the users accessing the virtual machine, and the hosted and shared connections can be accessed from there.

A virtual machine can have different types of virtual storage, but from the early days of x86-based virtualization, file-based virtual storage or specifically the virtual hard disk (VHD) type of virtual machine storage is famous and the most widely used. There are other types of virtual storage such as pass-through disks, where the administrator attaches the physical or local disk of hypervisors to the virtual machine, so the virtual machine is not writing on a file-based virtual storage but a physical disk or SAN LUN attached to the hypervisor machine, which is then made available to the virtual machine as a pass-through disk.

Virtual machine storage requirements are based on the type of server role and application running and the workload. This emphasizes the need to configure the correct type of virtual storage required by the virtual machine. For example, let's say we have a requirement to install a database server application, for instance Microsoft SQL Server; in this case, SQL Server may require several types of storage, such as an OS disk, application disk, database files (MDF), and database logs (LDF). So for each of these types of storage, we may configure and provide the virtual storage for our SQL Server virtual machine as follows:

table

The preceding table shows the recommended types of virtual storage needed for the Microsoft virtual machine. So in this case if an administrator chooses a wrong type of virtual storage, it will result in a low-performance disk with slow I/O allotted to the SQL Server database or transactional logs, which would then result in poor SQL Server database performance.

Later on in this article, we will discuss the best storage practices for a Hyper-V virtual machine, which will guide you to choose the correct type of virtual machine storage for your critical virtual machines; we will also discuss a few real-world scenarios where insufficient planning and inadequate virtual machine resources can affect virtualization projects negatively, after which we will address the solution to overcome these issues related to performance and virtual machine storage.

For a better understanding of virtual storage, let's first start by discussing the numerous new virtual machine storage features that have been introduced in Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V 3.0. Then we will discuss the various types of Hyper-V storage for virtual machines, which will provide you with end-to-end knowledge about the different types of virtual storage you can use for your virtual machine.

Improved Hyper-V storage

Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V has introduced a series of improvements for virtual machine storage. All these new storage features and improvements in the existing storage types for virtual machines have allowed Hyper-V to fully cater for the end-to-end needs of server virtualization.

In the earlier version of Hyper-V, there were a few caveats for virtual machine storage selection. These virtual machine storage caveats didn't allow customers to select relaxed and flexible virtual machine storage platforms. One of the examples of these types of rigid storage selections for virtual machines is that virtual machine storage cannot be placed on an SMB file share. There are other major problems with virtual machine storage selection that we saw in the previous Windows Server and Hyper-V releases. These problems are as follows:

  • Inability to perform live storage migration

  • Incapability of connecting the virtual machine to fibre channel storage

  • Limited size of virtual hard disk, that is, 2 TB

  • Difficulty in building a guest virtual machine cluster with only iSCSI SAN

  • Incapability of performing a disk merge operation while the VM is running

Microsoft Windows Server 2012 addresses all these problems that customers were faced with in the earlier versions of Windows Server and Hyper-V. Now let's go ahead and discuss how Windows Server 2012 and Hyper-V address these problems related to virtual machine storage and provide flexible virtual machine storage selection for customers.

The following newly added features and enhancements of Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V now make it much easier for customers to select a wide variety of virtual machine storage options:

  • Virtual Fibre Channel connectivity for a virtual machine

  • Larger virtual hard disk support of up to 64 TB

  • Virtual machine storage and live virtual storage migration based on Server Message Block (SMB)

  • The possibility of relaxed virtual machine clustering with virtual Fibre Channel

  • Native disk support of 4 KB sectors

  • Live disk merging operations for a virtual machine hard disk

  • Availability of secure offloading data transfer for virtual machine storage

Let's now discuss a few of the preceding new features added to Hyper-V storage in detail.

Virtual Fibre Channel connectivity for virtual machines

This is one of my favorite features within Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V. This feature allows Hyper-V based virtual machines to access external SAN storage based on the Fibre Channel. This will open a new door for building clustered virtual machines and making your critical workloads highly available with fully supported Fibre Channel SAN storage.

Working of Hyper-V Virtual Fibre Channel

Hyper-V Virtual Fibre Channel for virtual machines in Windows Server 2012 works in a manner similar to the physical connectivity that was established when you connected a physical server to the Fibre Channel SAN storage. For Hyper-V Fibre Channel connectivity for virtual machines in Windows Server 2012, we use N_Port ID Virtualization (NPIV) technology. As a process of virtualizing your Fibre Channel SAN, an NPIV port is created on the server running Hyper-V and is associated with the virtual Fibre Channel adapter. Additionally, a World Wide Name (WWN) is assigned to the NPIV port, which allows all I/O to be redirected to a specific virtual Fibre Channel adapter in the virtual machine.

In Windows Server 2012, Hyper-V connectivity to the Fibre Channel storage is done by using multipath I/O (MPIO); this ensures continuous connectivity to the Fibre Channel storage from within the virtual machine. In addition to all these great characteristics of the MPIO feature, we can also configure multiple virtual Fibre Channel adapters in a VM, while at the same time, we can also separate each copy of the multiple MPIO paths within the OS of the virtual machine, to connect to the SAN LUNs.

Larger virtual hard disk support (up to 64 TB)

We all loved virtual hard disk (VHD) because of its simplicity and ease of implementation among its other features/characteristics. But while working with Windows Server 2008 / 2008 R2, we saw a caveat where VHD failed to fulfill the requirement of having a larger virtual hard disk because of its limited maximum size of 2 TB. Usually, people encounter this problem when they run/are running a file server or any other server application that requires a larger amount of disk space.

In Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V, Microsoft introduced a new format of virtual hard disks for virtual machines that is called VHDX. Here "X" represents the extended capabilities of VHD, where a VHDX can now be as large as 64 TB, which is a far bigger size than the original VHD format.

This new format with an extended maximum size addresses all the past problems of building virtual machines with a larger virtual hard disk.

In addition to this, VHDX also provides the following list of benefits over the VHD format:

  • It increases performance for applications and workloads, especially on physical disks that have a sector size larger than 512 bytes

  • It supports the storage of custom metadata

  • It logs updates to the VHDX metadata structures

  • It supports larger block sizes for dynamic and differencing disks, which allows the disks to be tuned in to the needs of the virtualized workloads

  • It allows you to configure and manage virtual hard disks on a computer running Hyper-V, using Windows PowerShell commands

SMB-based virtual machine storage

Before we go ahead and explain this feature in detail, let me point out a limitation of Hyper-V Windows Server 2008 / 2008 R2, which we all faced in the past. Small- to medium-sized companies faced the biggest problem of making larger disks locally available to Hyper-V server to virtualize more servers and applications from their infrastructure. Due to having a limited amount of local disk space, we always saw ourselves in a bit of a problem. And while dealing with this problem, we all thought of using SMB storage for Hyper-V because of its feasibility and availability, where we could store virtual machines on a file server, but it was not available in earlier versions of the Hyper-V server.

Good news! Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V supports storage based on SMB 3, which could be your Windows file server, for storing data related to the virtual machine, including virtual machine configuration files, virtual hard disks (VHD/VHDX), and virtual machine snapshots (AVHD). This new feature makes it very easy for small- to medium-sized organizations to create more virtual machines, while having limited amount of disk space available on their Hyper-V servers locally.

Okay, we read the good news; now let's read a bit about SMB 3. SMB 3 allows you to use your file server storage for Hyper-V virtual machine placement. This will enable you to store virtual machines based on Hyper-V on the cheaper disks of the file server. While on the one hand it may save some dollars, on the other hand it may affect the virtual machine's storage performance.

Moreover, you can also enhance network performance by using the Hyper-V server's NICs that support the Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) feature. This will enable all the functionalities to work on low latency and CUP, while working at full speed. While using an SMB-based file server as storage for your Hyper-V server, you can have all the benefits that you used to have when using SAN storage for your Hyper-V virtual machine storage.

Virtual machine live storage migration

There are many situations where critical virtual machine storage needs to be migrated from its current storage platform to a different one. This could be because there is a need to migrate the virtual machine's storage from a slow disk to a faster one, or there could be many more reasons. In the previous releases of Windows Server 2008 and Hyper-V, migrating virtual machine storage for running workloads was not possible. And the only solution we had was to bring down the virtual machine to migrate its storage platform.

Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V addressed this problem with all its other features and has now made it possible for customers to perform live migration of virtual machine storage from one location to another.

Read Insight into Hyper-V Storage in full

Insight into Hyper-V Storage

by Zahir Hussain Shah | May 2013 | Enterprise Articles

(For more resources related to this topic, see here.)

Understanding virtual storage

A virtual machine that simulates the same computing architecture as the physical machine holds the virtual storage for its operating system. This storage can be set up in many different ways, where a virtual machine can have the same or different sizes of storage at the same time. This virtual storage can be accessed by the guest operating system, and in the case of a file server or other content and application server based virtual workloads, it can also be made available to the users accessing the virtual machine, and the hosted and shared connections can be accessed from there.

A virtual machine can have different types of virtual storage, but from the early days of x86-based virtualization, file-based virtual storage or specifically the virtual hard disk (VHD) type of virtual machine storage is famous and the most widely used. There are other types of virtual storage such as pass-through disks, where the administrator attaches the physical or local disk of hypervisors to the virtual machine, so the virtual machine is not writing on a file-based virtual storage but a physical disk or SAN LUN attached to the hypervisor machine, which is then made available to the virtual machine as a pass-through disk.

Virtual machine storage requirements are based on the type of server role and application running and the workload. This emphasizes the need to configure the correct type of virtual storage required by the virtual machine. For example, let's say we have a requirement to install a database server application, for instance Microsoft SQL Server; in this case, SQL Server may require several types of storage, such as an OS disk, application disk, database files (MDF), and database logs (LDF). So for each of these types of storage, we may configure and provide the virtual storage for our SQL Server virtual machine as follows:

table

The preceding table shows the recommended types of virtual storage needed for the Microsoft virtual machine. So in this case if an administrator chooses a wrong type of virtual storage, it will result in a low-performance disk with slow I/O allotted to the SQL Server database or transactional logs, which would then result in poor SQL Server database performance.

Later on in this article, we will discuss the best storage practices for a Hyper-V virtual machine, which will guide you to choose the correct type of virtual machine storage for your critical virtual machines; we will also discuss a few real-world scenarios where insufficient planning and inadequate virtual machine resources can affect virtualization projects negatively, after which we will address the solution to overcome these issues related to performance and virtual machine storage.

For a better understanding of virtual storage, let's first start by discussing the numerous new virtual machine storage features that have been introduced in Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V 3.0. Then we will discuss the various types of Hyper-V storage for virtual machines, which will provide you with end-to-end knowledge about the different types of virtual storage you can use for your virtual machine.

Improved Hyper-V storage

Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V has introduced a series of improvements for virtual machine storage. All these new storage features and improvements in the existing storage types for virtual machines have allowed Hyper-V to fully cater for the end-to-end needs of server virtualization.

In the earlier version of Hyper-V, there were a few caveats for virtual machine storage selection. These virtual machine storage caveats didn't allow customers to select relaxed and flexible virtual machine storage platforms. One of the examples of these types of rigid storage selections for virtual machines is that virtual machine storage cannot be placed on an SMB file share. There are other major problems with virtual machine storage selection that we saw in the previous Windows Server and Hyper-V releases. These problems are as follows:

  • Inability to perform live storage migration

  • Incapability of connecting the virtual machine to fibre channel storage

  • Limited size of virtual hard disk, that is, 2 TB

  • Difficulty in building a guest virtual machine cluster with only iSCSI SAN

  • Incapability of performing a disk merge operation while the VM is running

Microsoft Windows Server 2012 addresses all these problems that customers were faced with in the earlier versions of Windows Server and Hyper-V. Now let's go ahead and discuss how Windows Server 2012 and Hyper-V address these problems related to virtual machine storage and provide flexible virtual machine storage selection for customers.

The following newly added features and enhancements of Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V now make it much easier for customers to select a wide variety of virtual machine storage options:

  • Virtual Fibre Channel connectivity for a virtual machine

  • Larger virtual hard disk support of up to 64 TB

  • Virtual machine storage and live virtual storage migration based on Server Message Block (SMB)

  • The possibility of relaxed virtual machine clustering with virtual Fibre Channel

  • Native disk support of 4 KB sectors

  • Live disk merging operations for a virtual machine hard disk

  • Availability of secure offloading data transfer for virtual machine storage

Let's now discuss a few of the preceding new features added to Hyper-V storage in detail.

Virtual Fibre Channel connectivity for virtual machines

This is one of my favorite features within Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V. This feature allows Hyper-V based virtual machines to access external SAN storage based on the Fibre Channel. This will open a new door for building clustered virtual machines and making your critical workloads highly available with fully supported Fibre Channel SAN storage.

Working of Hyper-V Virtual Fibre Channel

Hyper-V Virtual Fibre Channel for virtual machines in Windows Server 2012 works in a manner similar to the physical connectivity that was established when you connected a physical server to the Fibre Channel SAN storage. For Hyper-V Fibre Channel connectivity for virtual machines in Windows Server 2012, we use N_Port ID Virtualization (NPIV) technology. As a process of virtualizing your Fibre Channel SAN, an NPIV port is created on the server running Hyper-V and is associated with the virtual Fibre Channel adapter. Additionally, a World Wide Name (WWN) is assigned to the NPIV port, which allows all I/O to be redirected to a specific virtual Fibre Channel adapter in the virtual machine.

In Windows Server 2012, Hyper-V connectivity to the Fibre Channel storage is done by using multipath I/O (MPIO); this ensures continuous connectivity to the Fibre Channel storage from within the virtual machine. In addition to all these great characteristics of the MPIO feature, we can also configure multiple virtual Fibre Channel adapters in a VM, while at the same time, we can also separate each copy of the multiple MPIO paths within the OS of the virtual machine, to connect to the SAN LUNs.

Larger virtual hard disk support (up to 64 TB)

We all loved virtual hard disk (VHD) because of its simplicity and ease of implementation among its other features/characteristics. But while working with Windows Server 2008 / 2008 R2, we saw a caveat where VHD failed to fulfill the requirement of having a larger virtual hard disk because of its limited maximum size of 2 TB. Usually, people encounter this problem when they run/are running a file server or any other server application that requires a larger amount of disk space.

In Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V, Microsoft introduced a new format of virtual hard disks for virtual machines that is called VHDX. Here "X" represents the extended capabilities of VHD, where a VHDX can now be as large as 64 TB, which is a far bigger size than the original VHD format.

This new format with an extended maximum size addresses all the past problems of building virtual machines with a larger virtual hard disk.

In addition to this, VHDX also provides the following list of benefits over the VHD format:

  • It increases performance for applications and workloads, especially on physical disks that have a sector size larger than 512 bytes

  • It supports the storage of custom metadata

  • It logs updates to the VHDX metadata structures

  • It supports larger block sizes for dynamic and differencing disks, which allows the disks to be tuned in to the needs of the virtualized workloads

  • It allows you to configure and manage virtual hard disks on a computer running Hyper-V, using Windows PowerShell commands

SMB-based virtual machine storage

Before we go ahead and explain this feature in detail, let me point out a limitation of Hyper-V Windows Server 2008 / 2008 R2, which we all faced in the past. Small- to medium-sized companies faced the biggest problem of making larger disks locally available to Hyper-V server to virtualize more servers and applications from their infrastructure. Due to having a limited amount of local disk space, we always saw ourselves in a bit of a problem. And while dealing with this problem, we all thought of using SMB storage for Hyper-V because of its feasibility and availability, where we could store virtual machines on a file server, but it was not available in earlier versions of the Hyper-V server.

Good news! Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V supports storage based on SMB 3, which could be your Windows file server, for storing data related to the virtual machine, including virtual machine configuration files, virtual hard disks (VHD/VHDX), and virtual machine snapshots (AVHD). This new feature makes it very easy for small- to medium-sized organizations to create more virtual machines, while having limited amount of disk space available on their Hyper-V servers locally.

Okay, we read the good news; now let's read a bit about SMB 3. SMB 3 allows you to use your file server storage for Hyper-V virtual machine placement. This will enable you to store virtual machines based on Hyper-V on the cheaper disks of the file server. While on the one hand it may save some dollars, on the other hand it may affect the virtual machine's storage performance.

Moreover, you can also enhance network performance by using the Hyper-V server's NICs that support the Remote Direct Memory Access (RDMA) feature. This will enable all the functionalities to work on low latency and CUP, while working at full speed. While using an SMB-based file server as storage for your Hyper-V server, you can have all the benefits that you used to have when using SAN storage for your Hyper-V virtual machine storage.

Virtual machine live storage migration

There are many situations where critical virtual machine storage needs to be migrated from its current storage platform to a different one. This could be because there is a need to migrate the virtual machine's storage from a slow disk to a faster one, or there could be many more reasons. In the previous releases of Windows Server 2008 and Hyper-V, migrating virtual machine storage for running workloads was not possible. And the only solution we had was to bring down the virtual machine to migrate its storage platform.

Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V addressed this problem with all its other features and has now made it possible for customers to perform live migration of virtual machine storage from one location to another.

Read Insight into Hyper-V Storage in full

Insight into Hyper-V Storage

by Zahir Hussain Shah | May 2013 | Enterprise Articles

In this article by Zahir Hussain Shah, the author of Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V: Deploying Hyper-V Enterprise Server Virtualization Platform, we will dive deeper into Hyper-V storage, where we will discuss the various types of storage options available with Microsoft Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V for a virtual machine in detail.

Read Insight into Hyper-V Storage in full

Inserting Multiple Entries with MySQL for Python

by Albert Lukaszewski, PhD | September 2010 | MySQL Open Source

When we deal with large amounts of data that are all going into the same database, running single instances of individual INSERT commands can take a ridiculous amount of time and waste a considerable amount of I/O. What we need is a way to insert multiple items in one go.

In this article, Albert Lukaszewski, PhD, author of MySQL for Python, we will look at the following:

  • How iteration can help us execute several individual INSERT statements rapidly
  • Using executemany() to submit several INSERT statements in one go
  • When not to use executemany()
  • Throttling how much data is inserted at a time
Read Inserting Multiple Entries with MySQL for Python in full

iNotes and Sametime—Chatting from the Web

by Marie L. Scott Thomas Duff | September 2010 | Enterprise Articles IBM

If you’re running the web version of the Notes e-mail system known as iNotes, you can easily have Sametime up and running just by signing on to your e-mail file via a web browser. And, if you’re used to running the embedded version of Sametime in the Notes client, you’ll hardly be able to tell the difference.

In this article, by Marie L. Scott & Thomas Duff, authors of IBM Lotus Sametime 8 Essentials you’ll learn how to:

  • Set the Sametime preference in iNotes.
  • Log into Sametime from iNotes.
  • Chat with others using Sametime from iNotes
  • Display the Sametime contacts in the iNotes sidebar.
  • Add new contacts to Sametime in iNotes.
  • Set and change your availability status in Sametime for iNotes.
  • Launch the Help files for Sametime in iNotes.
Read iNotes and Sametime—Chatting from the Web in full

Innovation of Communication and Information Technologies

by Daniel Jonathan Valik | June 2013 | Enterprise Articles Microsoft

In this article by Daniel Jonathan Valik, author of Microsoft Lync 2013 Unified Communications: From Telephony to Real Time Communication in the Digital Age we delve deep into the technologies, software solutions, and innovative communication capabilities. But before that let me first ask you several questions:

  • Have you ever considered how important communication is in your daily life?

  • How much do you communicate every day, or how many people do you converse with daily on various issues?

  • Is this exchange of information important and necessary?

Read Innovation of Communication and Information Technologies in full

Inkscape: SVG Filter Effects

by Mihaela Jurković Rigel Di Scala | April 2011 | Open Source

Get exclusive offers on Open Source Graphic Application and Library books through out this month. For more information click here.

Inkscape is frequently mentioned, and lauded, as one of the best examples of open-source software available today. It is a mature, feature-full and flexible product, thanks to a very dedicated developer community. The latest version, 0.48, adds new tools, such as the Airbrush (which many have longed for), and advanced path editing, among many other additions and improvements.

In this article by Mihaela Jurković and Rigel Di Scala, authors of Inkscape 0.48 Illustrator's Cookbook, we will cover:

  • Blurring
  • Creating irregular edges using filters
  • Using lighting effects
  • Creating a red wax seal
  • Creating a brushed steel effect
  • Creating a water surface effect
  • Filtering all objects in a layer
  • Creating your own filter from scratch
Read Inkscape: SVG Filter Effects in full

Inkscape: Live Path Effects

by Mihaela Jurković Rigel Di Scala | May 2011 | Open Source

Inkscape is frequently mentioned, and lauded, as one of the best examples of open-source software available today. It is a mature, feature-full and flexible product, thanks to a very dedicated developer community. The latest version, 0.48, adds new tools, such as the Airbrush (which many have longed for), and advanced path editing, among many other additions and improvements.

In this article by Mihaela Jurkovic and Rigel Di Scala, authors of Inkscape 0.48 Illustrator's Cookbook, we will cover:

  • Bending paths
  • Using Patterns along path
  • Using Envelope Deformation
  • Interpolating Sub-Paths
  • Stitching Sub-Paths
  • Creating gears
  • Creating hatches (rough)
  • Sketching shapes
  • Constructing grids
  • Creating rulers
  • Creating knots
  • Generating VonKoch fractals
Read Inkscape: Live Path Effects in full

Inkscape Starter

by Bethany Hiitola | September 2011 | Open Source

Open Source

Get started with this quick introduction to Inkscape, its features, and the community

 

Read Inkscape Starter in full

Inkscape FAQs

by Bethany Hiitola | January 2011 | Open Source

The Inkscape graphics editor is powerful, but getting started is often difficult. With Inkscape, you can learn to build your first website design, create web page and desktop wallpapers with repeating pattern backgrounds and swirling designs. Incorporate icons and interactive maps on your website. Style and graphically manipulate text—from simple headings to shadowing, following paths, reflections, 3D effects, and more. Enhance your web pages using flowcharts, diagrams, and site maps and learn how to export them. Spruce it all up using animations.

In this article we will cover some of the most frequently asked questions on Inkscape such as;

  • What is Inkscape?
  • What platforms does Inkscape run on?
  • What is the interface of Inkscape like?
Read Inkscape FAQs in full

Ink Slingers

by Michael Rhodes | April 2014 | Beginner's Guides Open Source

In this article, by Michael Rhodes, the author of Manga Studio 5 Beginner's Guide, you will learn pressure settings and inking and how to create new brush tips for airbrushes and other marking tools.

In this article, we'll be covering the following topics in depth:

  • What is inking?

  • Tools that Manga Studio provides to let us ink our artwork

  • Using rulers and guides for inking

  • Creating a customized brush for special effects

  • How to use the Manga Studio default tones

  • A walk-through inking example

Read Ink Slingers in full

Inheritance in Python

by Dusty Phillips | December 2010 | Open Source

In the programming world, duplicate code is considered evil. We should not have multiple copies of the same, or similar code in different places. There are many ways to merge similar pieces of code or objects with similar functionality. In this article by Dusty Phillips, author of Python 3 Object Oriented Programming, we'll be covering the most famous object-oriented principle: inheritance. Inheritance allows us to create "is a" relationships between two or more classes, abstracting common details into superclasses and storing specific ones in the subclass.

In particular, we'll be covering the Python syntax and principles for:

  • Basic inheritance
  • Inheriting from built-ins
  • Multiple inheritance
Read Inheritance in Python in full

Infinispan Data Grid: Infinispan and JBoss AS 7

by Francesco Marchioni Manik Surtani | August 2012 | JBoss Open Source

The Infinispan data grid platform is an open source data grid solution written in Java, providing features such as large data sets, heterogeneity, scalability, and much more. The Infinispan API is also embedded into the latest release of JBoss Application Server (7.1 at the time of writing).

In this article by Manik Surtani and Francesco Marchioni, the authors of Infinispan Data Grid Platform, we will cover the following topics:

  • At first we will shortly introduce shortly the new application server platform
  • Next we will show how you can configure and develop applications using Infinispan API on a JBoss AS 7 server

 

Read Infinispan Data Grid: Infinispan and JBoss AS 7 in full

Individual Learning Plan (ILP) with Moodle 1.9

by Paul Taylor | May 2010 | e-Learning Moodle Open Source

This article by Paul Taylor, author of the book Moodle 1.9 for Design and Technology, will deal with a system that will allow students to reflect on their own work through the setting of targets by staff and themselves. As with all things in Moodle, there are a number of ways to achieve this, but perhaps the most accessible is the third party module called the Individual Learning Plan (ILP) activity module, developed and maintained by ULCC and available at http://moodle.org/mod/data/view.php?d=13&rid=1025&filter=1.

Read Individual Learning Plan (ILP) with Moodle 1.9 in full

Indexing the Data

by Marek Rogoziński Rafał Kuć | April 2014 | Open Source

In this article by Rafał Kuć and Marek Rogoziński, authors of Elasticsearch Server Second Edition, we will learn about Elasticsearch indexing, how to configure our index structure mappings, and also see what field types we are allowed to use.

Read Indexing the Data in full

Indexing in MySQL Admin

by Daniel Schneller Udo Schwedt | June 2010 | MySQL

In this article series by Daniel Schneller and Udo Schwedt, authors of MySQL Admin Cookbook, we will cover:

  • Adding indexes to tables
  • Adding a fulltext index
  • Creating a normalized text search column
  • Removing indexes from tables
  • Estimating InnoDB index space requirements
  • Using prefix primary keys
  • Choosing InnoDB primary key columns
  • Speeding up searches for (sub)domains
  • Finding duplicate indexes

Read the first part of this article series—Optimizing your MySQL Servers' performance using Indexes here.

Read Indexing in MySQL Admin in full

Indexing Data in Solr 1.4 Enterprise Search Server: Part2

by David Smiley | August 2009 | Open Source

This is the second part of two part article series by David Smiley. In Indexing Data in Solr 1.4 Enterprise Search Server: Part1, we reviewed the first two out of the four main mechanisms that Solr offers:

  • Solr's native XML
  • CSV (Character Separated Value)

In this part, we will review the later two mechanisms that Solr offers:

  • Direct Database and XML Import through Solr's DataImportHandler
  • Rich documents through Solr Cell

 

Read Indexing Data in Solr 1.4 Enterprise Search Server: Part2 in full
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