Article Network

Cloudera Hadoop and HP Vertica

by Davide Moraschi | October 2013 | Enterprise Articles

In this article by Davide Moraschi, author of Business Intelligence with MicroStrategy Cookbook, explains how to connect from MicroStrategy to one of the most commonly used platforms for Big Data. The distribution used is CH4 with Impala and also demonstrates the connection to a common platform for columnar databases, the Vertica engine by HP. The distribution used is the Community Edition, freely available from the vendor site.

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Clusters, Parallel Computing, and Raspberry Pi – A Brief Background

by Andrew K. Dennis | November 2013 | Open Source

In this article by Andrew Dennis, author of the book Raspberry Pi Super Cluster, the basics of clusters and parallel computing have been explained. The domain of parallel computing is an interesting one, but building a cluster for fun has often required the use of expensive or bulky off-the-shelf hardware, such as desktop PC's or implementing complex virtual machine setups.

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CMS Made Simple 1.6: Getting Started with an E-commerce Website

by Sofia Hauschildt | March 2010 | Beginner's Guides Content Management Open Source Web Development

This article by Sofia Hauschildt, author of CMS Made Simple 1.6: Beginner's Guide, covers the Products module which will be the heart of your e-commerce solution. This module is the place where products that you would like to sell in your shop are saved. Generally, it is possible to use any other module for the solution, but this would imply that you have to make some heavy modifications to your templates and, probably, the PHP code of the modules.

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CMS Made Simple 1.6: Learning Smarty Basics

by Sofia Hauschildt | March 2010 | Beginner's Guides Content Management Open Source Web Development

In this article by Sofia Hauschildt, author of CMS Made Simple 1.6: Beginner's Guide, you will learn the basics of Smarty. Creating professional sophisticated designs is easier using Smarty. With the powerful combination of Smarty and HTML, there are no limits to the flexibility of the sites you design.

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CMS Made Simple 1.6: Orders and Payments in an E-commerce Website

by Sofia Hauschildt | March 2010 | Beginner's Guides Content Management Open Source Web Development

In the article CMS Made Simple 1.6: Getting Started with an E-commerce Website, we covered Products module. In this article by Sofia Hauschildt, author of CMS Made Simple 1.6: Beginner's Guide, we will learn about a solution made of following modules:

  • Cart
  • SelfRegistration (optional)
  • Orders
  • PaypalGateway (optional)
Read CMS Made Simple 1.6: Orders and Payments in an E-commerce Website in full

CMS Made Simple: Application of User-Defined Tags

by Samuel Goldstein | May 2011 | Content Management Open Source

This article will help us explore a few applications of tags. Most of these recipes are User-Defined Tags, because the capabilities of the User-Defined Tags are nearly identical to the file type of a tag.

In this article by Samuel Goldstein, author of CMS Made Simple Development Cookbook, we will cover:

  • Displaying the User's IP address from a User-Defined Tag
  • Using the current content object in a User-Defined Tag
  • Making a variable available to Smarty from a User-Defined Tag
  • Displaying the number of pages in the CMS using a User-Defined Tag
  • Using URL parameters in a User-Defined Tag
  • Using Smarty values as inputs in a User-Defined Tag

 

Read CMS Made Simple: Application of User-Defined Tags in full

Cocoa and Objective-C: Animating CALayers

by Jeff Hawkins | May 2011 | Cookbooks

Layers are a very powerful way to draw or animate your views. Using layer-backed views is similar to using layers in a graphics application like Adobe's Photoshop. Layers can be stacked and animated to create powerful effects.

In this article by Jeff Hawkins, author of Cocoa and Objective-C Cookbook, we will cover:

  • Understanding the CALayer class
  • Animation by changing properties
  • Using animation to swap views
  • Using the flip animation
  • Using a CAAnimationGroup
  • Using Keyframe animations
  • Using CAMediaTiming in animations
Read Cocoa and Objective-C: Animating CALayers in full

Cocoa and Objective-C: Handling Events

by Jeff Hawkins | June 2011 | Cookbooks

The trackpad is becoming more popular as an input device as all new Apple laptops now have a trackpad. Even desktop Macs have trackpad support with the addition of the Magic Trackpad. Adding gestures to your Cocoa application to support the trackpad is not difficult. The recipes in this article by Jeff Hawkins, author of Cocoa and Objective-C Cookbook, will show you how to add the three most popular gestures to your application. Specifically we will cover:

  • Interpreting the pinch gesture
  • Interpreting the swipe gesture
  • Interpreting the rotate gesture
  • Handling special keys
  • Working with NSResponder
  • Application-wide notifications with NotificationCenter
Read Cocoa and Objective-C: Handling Events in full

Cocos2d for iPhone: Adding Layers and Making a Simple Pause Screen

by Pablo Ruiz | December 2010 | Open Source

Cocos2d for iPhone is a framework for building 2D games, applications, presentations, demos, and more. It was originally made for Python and then ported to IPhone by Ricardo Quesada as an open source project with the MIT license.

In the previous articles by Pablo Ruiz, author of the book Cocos2d for iPhone 0.99 Beginner's Guide, we saw how to create new scenes and move through them, and build the base for an action game and how to handle accelerometer input and detect collisions.

In this article, we will see how to add more layers to your scenes and make a simple pause screen.

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Cocos2d for iPhone: Handling Accelerometer Input and Detecting Collisions

by Pablo Ruiz | December 2010 | Open Source

Cocos2d for iPhone is a framework for building 2D games, applications, presentations, demos, and more. It was originally made for Python and then ported to IPhone by Ricardo Quesada as an open source project with the MIT license.

In the previous article by Pablo Ruiz, author of the book Cocos2d for iPhone 0.99 Beginner's Guide, we saw how to create new scenes and move through them, and build the base for an action game.

In this article, we will see how to handle accelerometer input and detect collisions.

Read Cocos2d for iPhone: Handling Accelerometer Input and Detecting Collisions in full

Cocos2d for iPhone: Surfing Through Scenes

by Pablo Ruiz | December 2010 | Open Source

Cocos2d for iPhone is a framework for building 2D games, applications, presentations, demos, and more. It was originally made for Python and then ported to IPhone by Ricardo Quesada as an open source project with the MIT license.

Scenes are an essential part of any Cocos2d game. In this article by Pablo Ruiz, author of the book Cocos2d for iPhone 0.99 Beginner's Guide, we will look into the creation of many scenes to hold the different menus a game can have. Once we have a couple of scenes set up, you will learn how to go from one to another and with some nice transitions.

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Cocos2d-x: Installation

by Roger Engelbert | September 2013 | Beginner's Guides Games Open Source

In this article by Roger Engelbert, the author of Cocos2d-x by Example Beginner's Guide, we will cover the following:

  • How to download and install Cocos2d-x templates
  • How to run your first application
  • What the basic template looks like and how to find your way around it
  • How to run the test samples that comes bundled with Cocos2d-x
Read Cocos2d-x: Installation in full

Cocos2d: Uses of Box2D Physics Engine

by Nathan Burba | December 2011 | Open Source

For years, physics engines have been used in video games to add a sense of realism to the action onscreen. In many games, physics plays a crucial role within the gameplay. Cocos2d comes bundled with two popular 2D physics engines: Box2D and Chipmunk. In this article, we will explain the most common uses of physics in games using Box2D as our engine of choice.

In this article by Nathan Burba, author of Cocos2d for iPhone 1 Game Development Cookbook, we will cover the following points:

  • Box2D setup and debug drawing
  • Creating collision response routines
  • Using different shapes
  • Dragging and collision filtering
Read Cocos2d: Uses of Box2D Physics Engine in full

Cocos2d: Working with Sprites

by Nathan Burba | December 2011 | Open Source

Cocos2d is first and foremost a rich graphical API which allows a game developer easy access to a broad range of functionality. In this article, we will take a look at the basic uses of sprites.

In this article by Nathan Burba, author of Cocos2d for iPhone 1 Game Development Cookbook, we will cover the following topics:

  • Drawing sprites
  • Coloring sprites
  • Animating sprites
Read Cocos2d: Working with Sprites in full

Code Analysis and Debugging Tools in Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009

by David A. Studebaker | September 2010 | Enterprise Articles Microsoft

In the previous article, Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009 Development Tools, we gained an overall view of NAV as an application software system.

The goal of this article by David Studebaker, author of Programming Microsoft Dynamics NAV 2009, is to learn about many of the debugging tools and techniques available to the NAV developer. As it has been pointed out, "Without programmers, there are no bugs." As we are all developers and therefore a primary source of bugs, we need to be knowledgeable about the tools we can use to stamp out those bugs. Fortunately, NAV has a good arsenal of such tools.

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Code Editing

by Dan Peleg | December 2013 | Open Source

In this Article by Dan Peleg, the author of the book Mastering Sublime Text, explains Sublime's basic features to the most advanced features and techniques that need to be used while editing code.

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Code interlude – signals and slots

by Ray Rischpater | November 2013 | Open Source

This article is by Ray Rischpater, author of the book Application Development with Qt Creator. In software systems, there is often the need to couple different objects. Ideally, this coupling should be loose, that is, not dependent on the system's compile-time configuration. This is especially obvious when you consider user interfaces; for example, a button press may adjust the contents of a text widget or cause something to appear or disappear. Many systems use events for this purpose; components offering data encapsulate that data in an event, and an event loop (or, more recently, an event listener) catches the event and performs some action.

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CodeIgniter 1.7 and Objects

by David Upton | November 2009 | MySQL PHP Web Development

In this article by Jose Argudo Blanco and David Upton, we will see how CodeIgniter actually works, "under the hood". This article introduces a bit on object-oriented programming and how CodeIgniter makes use of it, including the use of the CI super object, and how we can modify and use. Here, we will also understand why things happen in certain ways, as opposed to just knowing that they do.

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CodeIgniter and Objects

by David Upton | December 2007 | MySQL Open Source PHP

Objects confused me when I started to use CodeIgniter. I came to CodeIgniter via PHP 4, which is a procedural language, not really an Object-Oriented (OO) language. I duly looked up objects and methods, properties and inheritance, and encapsulation, but my early attempts to write CI code were plagued by the error message "Call to a member function on a non-object". I saw it so often that I was thinking of having it printed on a t-shirt: it has a mysteriously libertarian, anarchist tone, and I could see myself wearing it at a modern art exhibition.

This is the geek article. It describes the way CodeIgniter actually works, 'under the hood'. If you are new to CI, you may want to skip it. However, sooner or later, you may want to understand why things happen in certain ways—as opposed to just knowing that they do.

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CodeIgniter Email and HTML Table

by Rob Foster | November 2013 | Open Source

CodeIgniter comes with some useful libraries and functions for handling many aspects of application development. In this article by Rob Foster, author of CodeIgniter 2 Cookbook, you will look at Email and HTML tables. The CodeIgniter Email library is capable of sending plain text and HTML e-mails, with and without attachments that can be used (with a little configuration) instead of the standard PHP mail() function.

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