Polishing Gems

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Avid Media Composer 6.x Cookbook

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Over 160 highly effective and practical recipes to help beginning and intermediate users get the most from Avid Media Composer 6 editing book and ebook.

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by Benjamin Hershleder | February 2013 | Cookbooks

This article by Benjamin Hershleder, author of Avid Media Composer 6.x Cookbook, explains that there are many useful features, gems if you will, that go underutilized. This article shines and polishes a few of them up by revealing some functions' hidden abilities, explaining their behavior, and/or giving you a few new ideas about how you might use them.

(For more resources related to this topic, see here.)

Understanding Track Sensitivity

The results you get when using several functions depends on which tracks are enabled/ selected in the Timeline window and how the transitions are constructed (i.e. straight cuts or split edits/"L-Cuts"). I call this Track Sensitivity. The functions that have this programming behavior are as follows:

  • Fast Forward & Rewind

  • Mark Clip

  • Go to Previous Edit and Go to Next Edit

How to do it...

Let's use the Fast Forward function to present the basic steps, and to point out the differences in the results, depending on what Track Selectors are enabled. In this example recipe, it's important to understand that we have several different segments (shots) in the sequence that have been placed on tracks V1, A1, and A2, and that the transition between each shot is a split edit (in other words, the cuts between shots are not straight, but are instead staggered. This is frequently referred to as an L cut). Follow these steps:

  1. On the Record Track Selector Panel, enable only the V1 Track Selector.

  2. Place the blue Position Indicator line at the beginning of the sequence.

  3. Click on the Fast Forward function and notice that the Position Indicator jumps to the next transition (cut) on the V1 track.

  4. Click on the Fast Forward button a second time. Again, it jumps to the next transition on the V1 track.

  5. Now, along with the V1 Track Selector, also, enable the A1 and A2 Track Selectors. In other words, enable all the Track Selectors.

  6. Place the Position Indicator at the beginning of the sequence.

  7. Click on the Fast Forward function. Notice that the Position Indicator does not jump to the next transition on the video track. Instead, it has jumped farther down the sequence. Potentially, it has even jumped to the very end of the sequence.

How it works...

Whenever you use Mark Clip, Fast Forward/Rewind, or Go to Previous/Next Edit, Media Composer is always looking for edit points (transitions) to pay attention to. When you have two or more tracks enabled, Media Composer is looking for the transitions that exist at the same time on all the tracks that are enabled.

Below is a comparison of two situations, using the Mark Clip function as an example.

In the first example, you have only the Video track enabled and you park your Position Indicator (blue line) within the segment you want to mark, as shown in the following screenshot:

When you click on the Mark Clip button, you can imagine that Media Composer sends out radar (metaphorically, of course) in both directions from the Position Indicator, as shown in the following screenshot:

On the selected track, when it detects a transition to the left-hand side, it places the Mark In, and when it detects a transition to the right-hand side, it places the Mark Out. Refer to the following screenshot:

That's easy enough. But what happens when there are multiple tracks enabled? In these cases, the metaphorical radar is looking for transitions that occur at the same time on all the tracks that are enabled.

In this second example, let's look at the same Sequence as earlier, but let's enable V1, A1, and A2, as shown in the following screenshot:

When you click on the Mark Clip button, Media Composer sends out its radar in both directions from the Position Indicator, as shown in the following screenshot:

When it detects a simultaneous transition on all the selected tracks to the left-hand side, it places the Mark In and when it detects a simultaneous transition on all the selected tracks to the right-hand side, it places the Mark Out as shown in the following screenshot:

Fast Forward/Rewind and Go to Next/Previous Edit pay attention to the Track Selectors and transitions in the same way as Mark Clip, except the radar is sent out in just one direction (either to the left or to the right).

There's more...

You can tell these functions not to pay attention when multiple tracks are enabled. In other words, you can make Media Composer ignore the Track Selectors. If you do this, then the radar pays attention to every transition on every track. This can be accomplished in different ways, depending on the function, and is discussed below.

Fast Forward/Rewind

These are the two methods that allow you to alter the default behavior:

  • Method 1: Press the option/Alt key while using either Fast Forward or Rewind. Now the Position Indicator stops at every edit point (transition) on every track no matter what tracks are enabled.

  • Method 2: Make Fast Forward and Rewind always ignore the Track Selectors (and save yourself the need of pressing the option or the Alt key). Go to the Project Window | Settings tab | Composer settings | FF/REW tab, and then enable the selection that says Ignore Track Selectors.

Mark Clip and Go to Previous/Next Edit

Below are the two methods that allow you to alter the default behavior:

  • Method 1: Press the option/Alt key when using the Go To Previous/Next Edit or Mark Clip functions. Using option/Alt key along with Go to Previous/Next Edit makes the Position Indicator stop at every edit point (transition) on every track. Using option/Alt key along with Mark Clip will mark the duration based on the two closest transitions from the Position Indicator on any track. This is useful enough that I have both Mark Clip as well as option/Alt + Mark Clip (see Method 2) mapped to my keyboard.

  • Method 2: Unlike Fast Forward/Rewind, there isn't a setting to change the way Mark Clip and Go to Previous/Next Edit behave, but all is not lost. If you'd rather not hold down the option/Alt key with these functions, you can add the option/Alt modifier right to the button, so it becomes a one button-push operation. I'll use the Go to Previous/Next Edit function in their default locations on the A and S keys for the example of how to do this below.

Follow these steps:

  1. Open your Keyboard settings by clicking on the Project Window | Settings tab | Keyboard.

  2. Open the Command Palette by clicking on Tools menu | Command Palette.

  3. Enable the Button to Button Reassignment selection in the lower left side of the Command Palette.

  4. On the Command Palette, select the tab labeled as Other.

  5. In the first column of buttons on the Command Palette you'll see a button labeled Add Option Key (on Mac) or Add Alt Key (on PC).

  6. Drag-and-drop the Add Option Key function or the Add Alt Key function right onto the Go to Previous Edit button on your keyboard (if it's still in its default location, it's on the letter A key).

  7. After adding this, get out your magnifying glass. If you look closely, you'll see a very small black dot has appeared just below the arrow symbol to indicate that the option/Alt modifier has been added.

  8. Repeat step 6 for the Go to Next Edit button.

Snapping actions for the Position Indicator and in Segment Mode

With just a couple of keyboard shortcuts, you can make your Position Indicator snap right to the transition you want, and in the exact position you need, exactly on the head frame (first frame) or on the tail frame (last frame).. Plus, the convenient thing is that Media Composer uses the same keyboard shortcuts for segments when you're moving them around.

How to do it...

Let's begin by making the Position Indicator or a segment Snap to Head. Follow these steps:

  1. Press and hold the cmd (on Mac) or Ctrl (on PC) keys.

  2. To make the Position Indicator snap, drag it forward or backward in the sequence, or click the cursor near a transition, to make the Position Indicator snap to the Head Frame (first frame) of a segment.

  3. To make a segment snap, do the following: Select a segment with either Segment Mode arrow (red or yellow). Now, when dragging segments, holding the cmd or Ctrl key makes the beginning (left-hand side, or head) of the segment snap to transitions that exist on any track.

  4. Next we'll make the Position Indicator or a segment Snap to Tail.

  5. Press and hold the keys cmd + option/Ctrl + Alt.

  6. Drag the Position Indicator forward or backward in the sequence, or click the cursor near a transition, to make the Position Indicator snap to the Tail Frame (last frame) of a segment.

  7. Select a segment with either Segment Mode arrow. Now, when dragging segments, holding cmd + option/Ctrl + Alt makes the end (right-hand side, or tail) of the segment snap to transitions that exist on any track.

There's more...

Below are two additional keyboard shortcuts that apply only when you're using Segment Mode, along with some helpful details about snapping with the Position Indicator and placing Marks.

Additional Segment Mode shortcuts

Press the cmd + Shift keys (on Mac) simultaneously or Ctrl + Shift keys (on Windows) simultaneously — this is useful when you want to move segment(s) from one track to another without getting out of sync. This keyboard shortcut will lock (constrain) segments into their current place in time on the Timeline when you move them up or down to another track. It should be noted that, at the time of writing, when you use this keyboard shortcut and move a segment, you will hear an alert sound. This is actually telling you that you have either enabled or disabled what Avid refers to as Four Frame Display. Using this keyboard shortcut was how Four Frame Display was enabled and disabled in the past. Now that it has been programmed to constrain segments to moving only up or down, it has become a bit of an annoyance. I'm sure that the enable/disable programming will be removed in a future release.

Press option (on Mac) or Alt (on Windows) — this keyboard shortcut actually doesn't control snapping, but since it has to do with moving segments, it made sense to include it here. Press the option key or Alt key while moving segments (and moving slowly) to ensure that you are moving just one frame at a time, regardless of the level of detail (how zoomed in or out you are) in the Timeline window.

Details about snapping

When you have snapped the Position Indicator line to the head of a segment, Media Composer will display a rather small, white, for lack of a better term I'll call it a bracket symbol, in the lower left-hand side corner of the Record Monitor. When you've snapped to the tail, the bracket symbol will be displayed in the lower right-hand side corner of the Record Monitor. Refer to the following screenshot:

Paying attention to where you place the Position Indictor is important as you edit. Notice that when you zoom in (using More Detail or the Scale Bar) to take a very close look at the Position Indicator, you'll see that the blue line isn't one single line at all. This is because the Position Indicator parks on, and designates, one frame. It's actually made of two lines. The solid line of the Position Indicator is on the left-hand side (the head) of the frame and the dotted line is on the right-hand side (the tail) of the frame. When you set a Mark In, it's placed on the head side, and when you set a Mark Out, it's placed on the tail side. The following screenshot shows that just one frame has been marked:

Enabling and disabling all Track Selectors from the keyboard

There will be a variety of instances when enabling or disabling all the Track Selectors will be necessary or helpful. One example is when you have many tracks and before you make an edit, you have to scroll up or down to check the status (enabled or disabled) of the hidden tracks. However, with the help of the next simple recipe, you can enable/disable all the tracks (even the ones you can't see).

How to do it...

Follow these steps:

  1. Select the Source Window, Record Window, or the Timeline Window.

  2. Use one of these keyboard shortcuts found in the Edit Menu:

    • Press cmd and A keys (on Mac) or Ctrl + A keys (on Windows) simultaneously to select all tracks

    • Press the A key along with Shift and Cmd (on Mac), or Shift and Ctrl (on Windows) to deselect all tracks

There's more...

Media Composer also allows you to map all 24 video Track Selectors and all 24 audio Track Selectors to the keyboard. You'll find them in Tools menu | Command Palette | Tracks tab. However, by default, Media Composer lets you enable or disable Track Selectors from the keyboard for a small number of tracks. Here is the default Track Selector keyboard mapping: V2 on the 7 key, V1 on the 8 key, A1 on the 9 key, A2 on the 0 key, A3 on the — key, and A4 on the = key.

Avid Media Composer 6.x Cookbook Over 160 highly effective and practical recipes to help beginning and intermediate users get the most from Avid Media Composer 6 editing book and ebook.
Published: December 2012
eBook Price: $29.99
Book Price: $49.99
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Enabling and disabling Track Selectors using the Shift key plus drag method

There will be times when you want to enable or disable a series of adjacent Track Selectors. Some examples would be enabling or disabling all the video tracks or all the audio tracks, or perhaps you have 10 audio tracks that are disabled and you want to enable only A5, A6, A7, and A8. This recipe of steps is a fast way to enable or disable a number of adjacent tracks in one quick swiping movement with your cursor.

How to do it...

Follow these steps:

  1. Press and hold the Shift key.

  2. Click and hold the mouse button down on any Track Selector on either the Source side or the Record side of the Track Selector Panel.

  3. Quickly drag the cursor either up or down over the Track Selectors.

    • If the initial click on a Track Selector disables it (turns it off), then as you drag, it will only disable the ones that is enabled

    • If the initial click on a Track Selector enables it (turns it on), then as you drag, it will only enable the ones that are disabled

How it works...

To demonstrate how this works, let's say I have eight video tracks in my Sequence. Currently enabled are V1, V3, V5, and V7. To quickly disable all of my video tracks with this method, I would hold down the Shift key, then I'd click and hold down the mouse button on the V1 Track Selector. Finally, I would quickly drag the cursor upward across the other video Track Selectors. The result: all the video tracks would be disabled.

Enabling and disabling Track Selectors using the Lasso

There will be instances when you would like to reverse the status (enabled or disabled) of one or more Track Selectors. One example would be if all the video and audio Track Selectors were enabled and you needed to quickly disable all of the video Track Selectors. See the How it works... section for another example.

How to do it...

Follow these steps:

  1. Click and hold the mouse button down in an area of the Timeline window (not within the tracks of the sequence) that is either above or below the Track Selectors for either the Source side or the Record side.

  2. Drag the cursor across the Track Selectors. Note that you will see a ghosted box (the Lasso), and that you do not have to surround the Track Selectors with the Lasso. You only have to make the Lasso come into contact with a Track Selector.

  3. Release the mouse button.

How it works...

Here is another example to illustrate how lassoing within the Track Selector Panel could be useful: I have four video tracks and six audio tracks in my Sequence. All the video tracks are enabled (turned on) and all the audio tracks are disabled. To quickly flip this around, I would click the cursor in the Timeline window above the video Track Selectors and hold down the mouse button. Then I would drag down across all the video and audio Track Selectors to create the Lasso. When I release the mouse button, all the video tracks would be turned off and all the audio tracks would be turned on.

Note that for anyone familiar with, or currently using, earlier releases of Avid Media Composer, in the past you could press the Ctrl key, which allowed you to lasso inside the Track Selector Panel (for example, lassoing over just V1, A1, and A2). At the time of writing, that is not currently available due to changes in programming that affected the Ctrl key.

Replace Edit: How and why

By default, you can find Replace Edit in the Fast Menu Tool Palette (the Fast Menu that, by default, is between the Splice In and Overwrite buttons as well as in the Timeline Toolbar), and in the Command Palette (Tools menu | Command Palette | Edit tab).

I often call Replace Edit the mysterious blue arrow, because so many don't know what it does and avoid using it. This is too bad because Replace Edit is a very useful tool that allows you to quickly replace existing segments (shots) in your Sequence as well as to sync a specific frame of video to a specific frame of audio (or vice versa).

Since I call it the mysterious blue arrow, which sounds like the name of a cartoon super hero, let me first explain its two super powers, which are as follows:

  • You don't have to Mark In or Out in either the Source Window or the Record Window when you use it. Replace Edit knows how much to edit into the Sequence based on the duration of the segment that's already in the Sequence.

  • It is always syncing whatever frame your Position Indicator is parked on in the Source Window to the spot where your Position Indicator is parked in the Sequence.

If this seems confusing, don't worry. After I go through the general steps, I'll also give you some specific examples.

How to do it...

When using Replace Edit, you can replace video only, audio only, or video and audio at the same time. It's simply a matter of what Track Selectors you've enabled.

As an example, this is a simple set of steps for replacing only a video segment. Additional information is in the There's more section that comes after these basic steps:

  1. Load the desired shot into the Source Window.

  2. In the Source Window, place the Position Indicator on the first frame of video you want to place into the Sequence. You do not need to Mark In or Mark Out.

  3. In the Sequence, park the Position Indicator on the first frame of the segment (shot) you want to replace. You do not need to Mark In or Mark Out.

  4. Patch the Source Video Track Selector to the Sequence video track that contains the shot you want to replace.

  5. On the Source Track Selector Panel, enable the video track.

  6. On the Record/Timeline Track Selector Panel, enable only the video track.

  7. Click on Replace Edit.

There's more...

Let's take a look at another way to use Replace Edit, and two applications of Replace Edit:

In and Out Marks work too

In addition to using existing transitions (edit points) in the Timeline window to determine the duration of video and/or audio to edit into the sequence, Replace Edit will also pay attention to a duration that you set in the Sequence using Mark In and Mark Out.

Syncing example with Replace Edit

You have edited a music track into your Sequence and have edited images on top of it. At one point in the music, there is a loud drum beat and you decide to replace the existing shot at that point in the Sequence with video of a hammer hitting a nail. Specifically, you want the frame when the hammer hits the nail to sync with the loud drum beat. Below are the steps to accomplish this:

  1. In the Source Window, park the Position Indicator on the frame where the hammer first comes into contact with the nail. Mark In and Mark Out are not required.

  2. In the Sequence, park the Position Indicator on the loud drum beat. Mark In and Mark Out are not required. If it helps you, an option is to display the audio waveform so you can see the exact location of the loud drum beat.

  3. Patch the Source Video Track Selector to the Sequence video track that contains the shot you want to replace

  4. Enable the Video Track Selector for the Source.

  5. Enable only the Video Track Selector for the Record side.

  6. Press Replace Edit.

  7. The result is that the previous shot is replaced and the image of the hammer hitting the nail occurs at the same moment as the drum beat.

Fast montage creation

Here's a classic tip that is great when you want shots placed at precise intervals. One example of this would be having your shots change on the beat of the music.

Since Replace Edit uses existing transitions (edit points) to determine how much video and/ or audio to place into the Sequence, what you're going to do first is to quickly create a series of transitions on an empty video track, and then use Replace Edit to swap the Filler for video.

Follow these steps:

  1. First you need to map the Add Edit function to a convenient button on the keyboard. You can find Add Edit by going to Tools menu | Command Palette | Edit tab.

  2. Edit the music into your sequence.

  3. If you do not already have an empty video track, then create one by going to Clip menu | New Video Track.

  4. Enable only the Track Selector for the empty video track.

  5. Play your sequence.

  6. Now you're going to tap to the beat of the music. As the music plays, tap the Add Edit function you mapped on the keyboard. Note that the edits you create will not appear until playback has stopped.

  7. After stopping the playback, you'll have a series of transitions in the video track that correspond to the beats in the music. If you missed a beat by a frame or two, the transition can be double-roller trimmed to adjust its position at any time, even if there's only Filler on the track.

  8. You can now use Replace Edit to replace the segments of Filler between each Add Edit with video.

See also

  • The Sync Point Editing: How and why recipe in this article

  • The Replacing Edit versus Sync Point Editing recipe in this article

Sync Point Editing: How and why

Sync Point Editing is an extra ability you temporarily give to the Overwrite edit function when you need it. After using it, you turn this ability off. Sync Point Editing allows you to perform an Overwrite edit and at the same time tell Media Composer to sync a specific frame of audio and/or video in the Source Window with a specific frame of audio or video in the Sequence. You use the Position Indicators in the Source window and in the Timeline window to establish the sync point.

Getting ready

For this example, imagine that you have edited a documentary about boxing and you now want to add in a sound effect of a punch to enhance the knockout blow. You have imported a clip of punch sound effects off of a CD, and the clip contains 12 different punch sounds. Some are louder and more forceful than others, so you'll have a choice to make. Further, you want the sound effect to sync with the moment the champion boxer hits the challenger.

How to do it...

Follow these steps:

  1. Load the sound effect clip into the Source Window.

  2. Load the sound effect clip into the Source Window.

  3. Mark In and Mark Out around the entire desired sound effect.

  4. While still in the Source Window, park your Position Indicator on the very first frame of the punch sound effect. See the There's more section for some options on accomplishing this.

  5. In the Sequence, park your Position Indicator on the video frame you want to sync the audio to. In this example, I would park it on the first frame that the champion's glove makes contact with the challenger's jaw.

  6. Patch the Source audio tracks to your desired Sequence audio tracks.

  7. On the Source side, enable the necessary Audio Track Selector(s).

  8. On the Record side of the Track Panel, enable only the necessary Audio Ttack Selector(s).

  9. Now you need to tell Media Composer that when you make the Overwrite edit to pay attention to the frame that the Position Indicator is parked on in the Source Window and to place that frame where the Position Indicator is parked in the Sequence. To do this, we'll give the Overwrite edit function the Sync Point Editing ability by following either of these methods:

    • Method one: Right-click in either the Source Window or the Record Window (it doesn't matter which). From the contextual menu that appears, select Sync Point Editing. Once you have done this, take a close look at the Overwrite button. You will see that the arrow icon has become a bit smaller and, more noticeably, an orange light has turned on below it.

    • Method two: Start by clicking anywhere in the Composer Window (also known as the Source/Record Window) to make it active. Then, go to the Special menu | Sync Point Editing. Once you have done this, take a close look at the Overwrite button. You will see that the arrow icon has become a bit smaller and, more noticeably, an orange light has turned on below it.

  10. Press the Overwrite button (which has the orange light now turned on) to make the edit.

  11. Once you have completed the edit, you'll want to turn off the Sync Point Editing feature. If you use this a lot, consider mapping it from the Special menu to a convenient button on the keyboard.

There's more...

Follow these options to locate an audio point:

  • Option 1 is to use scrubbing to locate the first frame of the sound effect by following these steps:

    1. Enable Audio Scrubbing by either pressing and holding the Shift key or enabling Caps Lock

    2. Using the Step Forward One Frame and Step Backward One Frame keys (by default mapped to the 3 and 4 keys) to locate the first frame of audio

  • Option 2 is to use the scrubbing feature of Play Reverse, Pause, and Play Forward (by default on the J, K, and L keys). For example, hold the Pause key and the Play Forward key at the same time to scrub forward.

  • Option 3 is to enable the Audio Waveform Display and also use Toggle Source/ Record in Timeline function to see the clip that's in the Source Window displayed in the Timeline Window in order to locate the first frame of the sound effect.

Summary

In this article, we became acquainted with Track Sensitivity, snapping actions for the Position Indicator, enabling and disabling Track Selectors from the keyboard, by using the Shift key + drag method, and by using the Lasso, and it also provided guidance on replacing Edit and Sync Point Editing.

Resources for Article :


Further resources on this subject:


Avid Media Composer 6.x Cookbook Over 160 highly effective and practical recipes to help beginning and intermediate users get the most from Avid Media Composer 6 editing book and ebook.
Published: December 2012
eBook Price: $29.99
Book Price: $49.99
See more
Select your format and quantity:

About the Author :


Benjamin Hershleder

Benjamin Hershleder (Hershleder.com) currently freelances as an Avid Editor and Director. He has been teaching Avid Media Composer since 1995, and became an Avid Certified Instructor in 1997. He teaches as an adjunct professor at the American Film Institute in Los Angeles, at Avid Authorized Training Partner institutions, and also provides private, customized training to individuals and facilities.

Hershleder is an award-winning Producer-Director and accomplished Editor. He has produced and/or directed a variety of projects for such companies as Shapiro/West, The Spark Factory, and Old Fashioned Pictures. This work includes co-writing and directing the award-winning (including an Emmy and the Gold Ebenseer Bear) short film "Paul McCall" and directing and editing the Telly award-winning documentary "The Bronx Boys – Hosted by Carl Reiner", which aired on PBS and as part of the Cinemax anthology series "Reel Life". Benjamin is currently completing the follow-up to this film. It is again hosted by Carl Reiner and is titled "The Bronx Boys – Still Playing At 80".

His other credits include developing, producing, and directing the pilot of "Spoilers" (not to be confused with Kevin Smith's new production of the same name), serving as a Consulting Producer on comedian Andy Kindler's concert film "I Wish I Was Bitter", and editing Paramount Studios' "The Original Latin Kings Comedy" (George Lopez, Paul Rodriguez, Cheech Marin). His background in post-production also includes editing the indie-feature film "Hollywood Capri", two years as an editor for E! Entertainment Television, and editing an hour-long pilot episode of "In Search Of…" for Fox.

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